Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: How long can you stay out in sub zero temps?

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Olympia washington
    Posts
    7

    Default How long can you stay out in sub zero temps?

    Sorry if this is a stupid question,but Iím really curious how long you can stay out on your lines in extreme temps? I thought frostbite/hypothermia could kick in pretty quickly even in proper gear. Anyway thanks for reading a post from someone that knows nothing about the subject lol

  2. #2

    Default

    No such thing as bad weather just poor clothing. The key is paying attention to what you are exposing to the cold. If you dress properly and do not let yourself start sweating, stay hydrated, and snacks to keep your energy up, you should be fine for several days. White bunny boots are great just change your socks out daily or twice daily to avoid trench foot. Mittens not gloves for your hands seal skin hat with large fur hood on parka. Medical foam tape on cheeks/nose if needed. As I noted it is better to be somewhat cold than hot, this keeps you from sweating so stop and remove layers when working, put them when you cool off. The key to cold weather survival/work is to slow down and avoid getting wet, tired, and prolonged skin exposure. If you do get wet, STOP, get dry and layer up.
    DENNY

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Olympia washington
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Ok cool I appreciate the response, Iím glad to know that it can be done with proper gear. What you say makes sense. for whatever reason I was thinking most people were just holing up in there cabins or tents when the temps are very low. My assumtions had me stuck thinking trapping couldnít possibly be very profitable/productive if you could only go out between cold snaps! Again thank you for the response!

    -Jordan

  4. #4

    Default

    Not a dumb question at all, but I would just like to add a few things to what boneguy mentioned. I have found that the limiting factor in the cold is not usually my clothes (or my body getting cold), but rather equipment. Like boneguy said, you can always add more layers. I have found that the limiting factor tends to be more mechanical. For example, several years ago when I was hauling lumber and supplies out to my remote property to build my cabin, there was one time when the temperatures got down to about minus 30 and minus 40 for about 4 days. My son and I made about 12 trips by snowmachine round trip 40 miles. Don't get me wrong, it was cold. But I don't recall feeling very cold. But I do remember we were having lots of equipment failure and mechanical issues. Our machines didn't want to start. My truck didn't want to start. We had to think outside the box and use heaters to heat things up, just to get them to roll over. So I would say that what keeps people from doing things after the temperature drops below a certain point is not discomfort, but rather the limitations of the equipment in cold weather. At a certain point it's just not worth the risk getting out and getting stranded because your snowmachine, truck, chainsaw etc. won't start. That's just my opinion. Take it for what it's worth.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,001

    Default

    ArcticMan 2014. It got down to minus 20f that night and we still had a good time!


    Attachment 97064

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    fairbanks, ak
    Posts
    630

    Default

    Extreme temps are relative. Big difference between 0 ( what most of the world considers extreme cold) and -40 (thatís where I draw the line of extreme cold). At 0 one can be comfortable for a long time if dressed properly and not over-exerting. Camping in -20 in a tent is actually kind of fun. Machines seem to run reliably around 0 too. When it gets cold mistakes turn from inconveniences to deadly. Getting wet at 0 is a major inconvenience where getting wet at -40 could cost you limbs and or life. ...that being said I tipped my sled over at -20 in some overflow and the spray as I slid through the overflow on my butt rather than soaking my clothes froze instantly when it hit them so it was easy to shake the ďwetĒ off as it was a thin layer of ice. 🤷🏼*♂️ I guess just be careful and think smart.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Two Rivers, AK
    Posts
    773

    Default

    It's not uncommon for temperatures to drop to -40 during the Yukon Quest, and it can get that cold during Iditarod, as well. People take care of their dogs and themselves in those temperatures and generally do okay.

    Sambuck's comments really capture the important points, I think. We have a lot of overflow in the interior.
    Mushing Tech: squeezing the romance out of dog mushing one post at a time

  8. #8
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    95

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by olympia_lowlife View Post
    Sorry if this is a stupid question,but Iím really curious how long you can stay out on your lines in extreme temps? I thought frostbite/hypothermia could kick in pretty quickly even in proper gear. Anyway thanks for reading a post from someone that knows nothing about the subject lol
    Good feedback to your question. No doubt the comments about proper equipment, staying dry and mechanical problems are spot on.

    I think the key is to be ready for equipment failure. Tools, key spare parts and cold weather gear must be carefully considered. Assume you will be stuck and have a plan to deal with it. For example having a spare belt for the snow machine as well as the tools and know how to change it.

    Also test your equipment before hand in the actual conditions you will experience. For example, if your only way to melt snow and heat food is a cartridge canister stove, then you are in for a rude awakening. At very cold temps they don't work well. A stove that uses white gas is a better call.

    But if you plan ahead it can be fun.

  9. #9

    Default

    Thermoregulation. Add or subtract layers like said. My cutoff point for the snogo is about-25, depending on what Iím doing. After that Iím on foot every day even if in the-50s . I think itís important to get out every day even if only for 3 hours or so. I do like to get in and dry gear every night- not a fan of cold camping.

  10. #10
    Member KantishnaCabin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    227

    Default

    For me I usually look pretty hard at the weather before I head out to the cabin in the winter. It's a 42 mile trip into the cabin during the winter. And I don't normally go just for the fun of it because its a 6 hr drive from my house to the trailhead. Stuff tends to really break at -50f, so that's a hard no-go for me. -35 to -40 is doable and I have done it many times but it ain't too fun. Most of my trips tend to be in the -20 to -30f range.

    Good gear is key, you find gaps in your clothing really quick when riding on a snow machine, especially if its windy. I prefer to ride with a full forearm length pair of mittens, however many of my riding partners prefer lighter gloves and gauntlets. Layers, layers and layers. Typically I start off a trip lighter on the clothing and add gear as I go if needed. It's a lot easier than you think to overheat in the winter and once you get sweaty its hard to keep the chill out. It's a 3-4hr trip out if there are no problems and the trail is broken. Time spent outside in the cold has never really been a problem, all day on occasion if I'm making round trips.

    Really, to answer your question. It depends on your own definition and tolerance level.

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Olympia washington
    Posts
    7

    Default

    I appreciate all the replies! Thereís definitely more to it than one not from the area would expect. the equipment failure at low temps is not something I would have thought of. I assume the metal and rubber components get brittle or something at temps that low? And also the differant fuel types not wanting to burn well in extreme cold I find interesting as well. Anyways thanks for the replies everyone if I can figure out how to give rep I will

  12. #12
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    10,731

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by olympia_lowlife View Post
    I appreciate all the replies! Thereís definitely more to it than one not from the area would expect. the equipment failure at low temps is not something I would have thought of. I assume the metal and rubber components get brittle or something at temps that low? And also the differant fuel types not wanting to burn well in extreme cold I find interesting as well. Anyways thanks for the replies everyone if I can figure out how to give rep I will
    Yes, when it gets cold enough metal can almost break like glass. And you don't wanna use butane when it comes to cold weather either. As far a sending a rep, just click on that little sheriff looking star on the bottom left of your post....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  13. #13

    Default

    My snow machine has a prop, wings, and ski's. So for me It is not only keeping getting the motor warm but removing or keeping frost off the wings. I used to live in Minnesota and rebuilt a tractor in the winter. I had a pot belly stove in the shop, I would put my tools /parts on it to warm them up every 10-15 min. At below zero temps it is easy to get frostbite touching any cold metal. Take your time start a fire or have some type of heater. MSR XKG stove will burn most anything at any temp/altitude. carry a pan to melt snow, cook, or warm tools. Learn to work in gloves!!!! Throw away the watch, everything will take longer just suck it up and keep you hands. feet, and face safe.
    DENNY

  14. #14
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    10,731

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by boneguy View Post
    Ö.At below zero temps it is easy to get frostbite touching any cold metal.....
    Yep....I burned (froze) the skin on my hand once having to rest it against a truck starter a little too long when trying to remove the bolts....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  15. #15
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    5,073

    Default

    Yes mechanical equipment working properly is definitely a big factor.
    As is a person's personal cold tolerance.
    Where I work on the slope I'm one of those people wearing a fall jacket when everyone else breaks out the full-on arctic gear.
    When it gets cold enough for me to put on my arctic gear everyone else is taking warm-up breaks every hour.
    But I'll go two or three hours before I take a break.
    The coldest I have worked in was where the temperature was -98 degrees Fahrenheit.
    That was on the North Slope oilfields and the rules were we are only allowed to work 15 minutes out of every hour.
    Another big factor is the wind I can take a lot of cold but there's nobody that can take a lot of wind and cold.
    If it's cold and calm a person can do a lot more than if it's cold and windy as the wind seems to find any crack in your armor.

    Sent from my S60 using Tapatalk
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    Yes mechanical equipment working properly is definitely a big factor.
    As is a person's personal cold tolerance.
    Where I work on the slope I'm one of those people wearing a fall jacket when everyone else breaks out the full-on arctic gear.
    When it gets cold enough for me to put on my arctic gear everyone else is taking warm-up breaks every hour.
    But I'll go two or three hours before I take a break.
    The coldest I have worked in was where the temperature was -98 degrees Fahrenheit.
    That was on the North Slope oilfields and the rules were we are only allowed to work 15 minutes out of every hour.
    Another big factor is the wind I can take a lot of cold but there's nobody that can take a lot of wind and cold.
    If it's cold and calm a person can do a lot more than if it's cold and windy as the wind seems to find any crack in your armor.

    Sent from my S60 using Tapatalk
    Not saying that you are lying, but I've always heard and read that the coldest recorded temperature in the United States and in Alaska was 80 below up by Coldfoot. If you hit 98 below that would be a new record. I wonder why it was never recorded by a meteorologist. I wonder if 98 below was the wind chill factor and not the true temperature.

  17. #17
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    5,073

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    Not saying that you are lying, but I've always heard and read that the coldest recorded temperature in the United States and in Alaska was 80 below up by Coldfoot. If you hit 98 below that would be a new record. I wonder why it was never recorded by a meteorologist. I wonder if 98 below was the wind chill factor and not the true temperature.
    Oops my bad.
    It was -98*f with the Wind chill factor.
    Coldest ambient I have seen was -62*f.

    Sent from my S60 using Tapatalk
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    Oops my bad.
    It was -98*f with the Wind chill factor.
    Coldest ambient I have seen was -62*f.

    Sent from my S60 using Tapatalk
    Either way, that's pretty frickin cold dude. I wouldn't wanna work in those temps either.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    374

    Default

    "Yes mechanical equipment working properly is definitely a big factor.
    As is a person's personal cold tolerance."

    .....and what I've found is my tolerance level (physically but probably much more mentally) is changing as I get older.

    My trips to the cold are purely recreational so when I was 20+ years younger, I could deal with -40 but wouldn't depend on the PA-12 or the old arctic cat unless it was -30 or warmer. Now, if the expectation is that it will get much below -20, I'll probably just stay home.

    But then I live in the Banana Belt of Los Anchorage and that guideline still allows lots of leeway.
    Back in AK

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •