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Thread: So I planted...

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    Member the nikster's Avatar
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    Default So I planted...

    While we were working on the cabin this fall, we tried to do what we feel is, improve the lot.
    We planted several bags of Alaska mixes (wildflowers) in the open areas we have that are presently just grasses. The grasses looked better in the summer before they died but we are just trying to add some color as well as promote an area we might, someday, be able to have bees.
    We also have a large area with a lot of fallen down and previously burned trees, both spruce and birch. Semi shaded and semi sunny.
    We purchased some morel mycelium and planted about 300 square feet in several areas with differing amounts of sunshine. We hope to return in the spring and find some favorable results in a few spots. Then we will replant in the similar areas that seem to promote success.
    We are probably still about 20 months away from occupying the cabin 24/7 but I am trying to make it as attractive to my city girl wife as I can. I cannot pipe in more sun and beach but I will do what I can.
    Nick Clegg
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    Greatthat you are planting areas that need reforestation.
    I contacted the state forest stewardship program to have a forester come out to discuss my property and develop a management plan for years to come.
    Great suggestions, tips and sources for trees and improvements.
    Give them a call-no charge professional forester advice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by otternorth View Post
    Greatthat you are planting areas that need reforestation.
    I contacted the state forest stewardship program to have a forester come out to discuss my property and develop a management plan for years to come.
    Great suggestions, tips and sources for trees and improvements.
    Give them a call-no charge professional forester advice.
    Great suggestion. I was taking the opportunity of the frozen swamps and ground to cruise my place yesterday. I have a plan that I have formulated, but I need to know if it's better to burn the scraps or to chip them up and spread them around.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Thanks for the link, I will definitely see if I qualify. I have just over 7 acres but some of it is power right of way and I need a bit of road which might knock me down below 7.
    i had some other plants I wanted to introduce for the browse value (clovers/Timothy) but local and internet advice suggested I not introduce anything that was not indigenous. I also understand that nature will eventually take its course and reclaim the areas. I just wanted to give the most natural boost I could.
    Nick Clegg
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    What kinds of trees could a person reasonably expect to transplant? I've got a neighbor who has two blue spruce and another neighbor who has some sort of pine in the yard, so it seems like the possibilities are greater than the plain old birch and chokecherry. We're up on the hill above Fairbanks, so it's generally warmer than the valley in winter. Cooler in summer though.

    I just pushed a bunch of dirt around to improve my drainage and I'm looking for something to plant come springtime.

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    For general ground cover within the firewise protection zone I use white clover. Grows fast and stays short. The bees love it which helps pollinate the garden and apple trees.

    I have started to plant larch trees and will continue with a variety of ever greens and deciduous. Best tree source thus far has been the ak foresters association spring sale.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Please be mindful of not planting / spreading invasives.

    http://accs.uaa.alaska.edu/files/invasive-species/InvasivePlantsOfAK.pdf
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Please be mindful of not planting / spreading invasives.

    http://accs.uaa.alaska.edu/files/invasive-species/InvasivePlantsOfAK.pdf
    Hmmm.... So do mean he shouldn't plant any purple loosestrife??? (joking/sarcasm)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    Hmmm.... So do mean he shouldn't plant any purple loosestrife??? (joking/sarcasm)
    ...Or white sweet clover.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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    I did not realize that the standard-issue chokecherry is an invasive - from England of all places.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Please be mindful of not planting / spreading invasives.

    http://accs.uaa.alaska.edu/files/invasive-species/InvasivePlantsOfAK.pdf
    I have seen this document. I did take it to heart and I will be wary, especially of blends. No trees for me.
    Nick Clegg
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    ...Or white sweet clover.
    Approved and encouraged by forester and was told the clover I used was not invasive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    ...Or white sweetclover
    (Melilotus alba). AKA: white melilot, honey clover, honey-lotus, tree clover, white millet. See pages 108-112 of the previously referenced publication.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It

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    There are conflicts in that publication between their recommendations and forestry's recommendations, including the planting of lodge pole pine, which I am going to continue to do.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    There are conflicts in that publication between their recommendations and forestry's recommendations, including the planting of lodge pole pine, which I am going to continue to do.

    How does the lodge pole do? Fast growing? Do you need to brush out the competition for it to get a good start? My larch are in tree tubes and that seems to help them get a foot hold.
    Its been recommended I expand tree species to lodge pole, blue spruce and Im already planting larch.
    Having a variety of species eliminates the mono/duo tree culture that exist now when the next tree epidemic comes through.
    My apple trees could be considered invasive by some, but then carrots could too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by otternorth View Post
    How does the lodge pole do? Fast growing? Do you need to brush out the competition for it to get a good start? My larch are in tree tubes and that seems to help them get a foot hold.
    Its been recommended I expand tree species to lodge pole, blue spruce and Im already planting larch.
    Having a variety of species eliminates the mono/duo tree culture that exist now when the next tree epidemic comes through.
    My apple trees could be considered invasive by some, but then carrots could too.
    I had thought about apples but just can’t put forth that kind of effort. I can imagine planting and protecting a dozen trees for 7 years just to have some hungry moose’s eat them all in a night. Carrots....hehehe. I guess, dependent on how long ago you want to look, almost all fruits and veggies are invasive or at least extremely modified from the original indigenous plant.
    Still, I plan to follow most of the recommendations I see. It is possible that there may be some conflict as there seems to be with the white clover. In those cases we are free to determine our own paths.
    Nick Clegg
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    http://nixoutdoorpursuits.blogspot.com/

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    You probably would succeed with apples where you are at anyway Nick.

    As for lodge poles, I have 9 in gravely soils and wide open sunlight (they seem to like it) that have grown over a foot a year. I have four in the shade that are not growing at that rate. They were planted as 1' tall trees.

    At my other property that we recently purchased, I have two lodge poles and one scotch pine that are pushing 20' tall and they are 15 years old in an area on the edge of a large 4 acre gravel/sand clearing.. The remainder of the property is over mature birch and dead spruce. I am starting a two winter project to thin out nearly 20 acres. I have a bunch of white spruce saplings that I will work around. On the areas that don't have white spruce I will be mixing in paper birch, scotch pine and lodge pole pine. I will be aggressively mowing and weed whacking around my replacement trees to give them the best chance they can have. It's a long term project and I will likely only get to enjoy my labors in my final years.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    You probably would succeed with apples where you are at anyway Nick.

    As for lodge poles, I have 9 in gravely soils and wide open sunlight (they seem to like it) that have grown over a foot a year. I have four in the shade that are not growing at that rate. They were planted as 1' tall trees.

    At my other property that we recently purchased, I have two lodge poles and one scotch pine that are pushing 20' tall and they are 15 years old in an area on the edge of a large 4 acre gravel/sand clearing.. The remainder of the property is over mature birch and dead spruce. I am starting a two winter project to thin out nearly 20 acres. I have a bunch of white spruce saplings that I will work around. On the areas that don't have white spruce I will be mixing in paper birch, scotch pine and lodge pole pine. I will be aggressively mowing and weed whacking around my replacement trees to give them the best chance they can have. It's a long term project and I will likely only get to enjoy my labors in my final years.
    Thanks for the info Doug.
    Any tree planting is for the next generation or two.
    I may never see an apple, but its fun to learn how to care for them. Someone will enjoy them.
    I have an 8’ electrified exclusion fence for big critters that, per game cams, works at preventing nibbles and packing snow around the trees, and tree tubes, have prevented screws from ringing the bark during winter.
    Good to have an idea of what others are doing.

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    About 30 years ago I put in 20 lodge pole and 20 white spruce. Planted them as a property line. The lodge pole really took off. Probably 30’ now. White spruce 25’ . Dug hole with post hole digger on bobcat. Then top soil in hole so I could backfill with topsoil from local pit. The soil that is there is sand and clay. I feel that the top soil helps get them started better. I had bought a 10 yard load for the garden but probably worth buying a bag so you give them the best chance to create a good root base. The soil is
    not compacted and I was able to do a ph test on the soil allowing me to provide the best possible growing environment for the roots. Adding fertilizer and such.There were years that the lodge poles grew 18” plus . My mother taught me a procedure that she learned from her dad, my grandpa ,
    that if you transplant a tree mark it to identify north with a ribbon, break a branch or something so that you place it in the ground it is facing the same direction. I believe it makes this more important the further north you go. We have all seen the frost splits in trees they always twist the same direction as if following the sun. Like sunflowers. The trees don’t have to orientate to the sun.
    At our cabin we are planting currents, raspberries type of plant. A food source if needed, or just good eats especially for the kids. Beats candy. Also putting in rhubarb. I am able to get transplants from my home as we have converted most of our garden to food producing perennials. Red, black , white currents , blue berries, honey or kaskap berries. We also have good success with scotch, larch, mountain ash trees and bush variety. My beautiful wife has had success with 6-7 different varieties of roses .
    Many of these plants are available from folks who like to share. And are proven hardy. Much better success in starting these as opposed to buying from a chain store. There are also a few greenhouses around that have been a family business for many years and know what works. Probably starts from there own plants. We use Sutton’s Brown Thumb greenhouse on Tudor Rd for many of these. This family has been doing this for 3 generations and really know how to grow in Ak. But there are a more around. My guess is that AKdoug could let you know who the locals around Sunshine, Talkeetna are if you pass through there. Maybe even helps locals out by selling plants grown by locals at his store.
    We also take advantage of the local food sources. Low and high-bush cranberry, Blueberry, currents , rose hips ,watermelon berries, fiddle head ferns in spring , crow Berries ( moss berry ) . Mushrooms are also available.
    The cooperative extension service is a great source. They can provide you with All the material you need. It it all on the web also. Probably some smarter folks who can put a connection on this . They also know all the local growers. No probably not those growers.
    Learning about how to use , for medical or food. All the local plants is a great way to spend time. Especially teaching kids.

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