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Thread: Useful skills / time

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by akaviator View Post

    Mountain and "backcountry" flying in the states is useless here really.
    Interesting. Iíve done both and have found the opposite. Do much flying in the weeds in the lesser 48?

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbflyer View Post
    Interesting. Iíve done both and have found the opposite. Do much flying in the weeds in the lesser 48?
    Don't know what you're getting at. I haven't done any "backcountry" lower 48 flying. What I'm saying is "backcountry" lower 48 flying doesn't translate to flying a sled in Bethel. It's about the weather and sloppy runways out there. I have a few thousand hours in rural Alaska.

  3. #23
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    I flew most of the Idaho back country strips and some of those in Montana for 2 years. Some of them are very short one way strips with no go around on short final with take offs on curving, rutted, down hill strips or climbing out through narrow canyons etc. I flew employed as a pilot all over Alaska for 135 operations and for lodges from 1975 until 2007. My lower 48 back country experience was very valuable in honing my skills for Alaska flying. Alaska has no monopoly on lousy weather...cold weather, icing conditions, wind, turbulence, bad visibility, snow storms, etc. Also the mountain flying experience flying out of Salmon Idaho was invaluable for tweaking my judgement in assessing safe procedures in dealing with mountain flying in Alaska, especially in windy conditions.


    So I have to agree with gbflyer in finding just the opposite true of akaviator's assertion that "You'll never need high mountain skills unless you end up guiding hunters in the Brooks Range" or "Mountain and "backcountry" flying in the states is useless here really." There are a few dozen roadless mountain passes in Alaska, some of them unamed through all of Alaska's 14 Major mountain ranges and many through the lesser ranges that are named off shoots of the major ones. Merrill, Rainy and Portage passes are notorious for their scattered airplane wrecks. So mountain flying experience is valuable even if it is acquired flying those ranges of the lower 48.

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