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Thread: stick cabin or log cabin

  1. #21
    Member the nikster's Avatar
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    I have pretty much assumed I would preserve them in years 1, 2 and 3. Then just on an as needed basis. I assume every 2 or 3 years after that. I am spraying on some Thompsonís mixed with boiled linseed oil then using a brush to backroll.
    Nick Clegg
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  2. #22
    Member skybust's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for all the great information much appreciated
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  3. #23
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Another option if you want a solid wood cabin but don't have the time is to check out milled log home kits like these http://heartlandtimberframehomes.com
    They go up quick, have the associated thermal mass etc. Of course you have to haul them in which may or may not be an issue if you have snowmobile access.
    Fighting gravity is never cheap.

  4. #24
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    What I use on my wood for a finish inside and
    outside; one part boiled linseed oil
    One part thinner
    One part tung oil
    Mold preventative
    Pigment as desired, though I use mine clear.

    Inside; skip the mold chemical
    Add one part oil based varnish.

    I skip the melted bees wax as recommended by the US Forest Service lab in Wisconsin.

    Two coats are use initially. The second interior coat is sanded in. This fills the wood pores with a slurry of finish and saw dust making in smooth to touch. Some rag wiping to collect excess finish is needed. I brush everything on.

    I like the color as patina develops.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mg4570 View Post
    What is the maintenance on log buildings? It seems that some people use green logs, and they eventually dry out and then remain beautiful forever. And other people warn that you need to treat and seal your logs and reapply the treatment/sealant every year or two, or insects and mold will destroy your logs. Not sure what causes one or the other to be true.
    I took a log cabin building class and now know the answer to my questions. You can use green logs, but they do dry out. The main problem is shrinkage (width, not length) as they cure over a few years, which can create gaps in chinking. They will not rot if kept dry, i.e. with big overhangs on the eaves and gables, but they could still mold and be damaged by insects, so at a minimum, they should be treated with a borate solution, preferably with a mold-fighting agent. Sealant is not necessary in this case. Sealant is more important if your logs will get wet, i.e. if your overhangs are not big enough and/or you have driving rain/snow.

  6. #26
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mg4570 View Post
    I took a log cabin building class and now know the answer to my questions. You can use green logs, but they do dry out. The main problem is shrinkage (width, not length) as they cure over a few years, which can create gaps in chinking. They will not rot if kept dry, i.e. with big overhangs on the eaves and gables, but they could still mold and be damaged by insects, so at a minimum, they should be treated with a borate solution, preferably with a mold-fighting agent. Sealant is not necessary in this case. Sealant is more important if your logs will get wet, i.e. if your overhangs are not big enough and/or you have driving rain/snow.
    "If" your logs will get wet? Driving horizontal rain is pretty common in Alaska....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  7. #27
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    I would suggest using some type of sealer with a mold/insect resistive product added, as many exterior finish products have. Small bottles are available at the big box stores near the paint counters to mix with your finish.
    I mix up a clear product based on an old CCC USFS formula for log buildings. Itís applied once every ten years. This does provide water protection in driving rains and equalized the log color so it all ages (patina) the same. Easy to apply. I use the same product on interior wood finishes. Coloring can be added if desired.
    Any log cabin builder (professional) Iíve met always seals their logs after peeling and sometimes after reassembly.

  8. #28
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    We went with 3 sided 6Ē logs. First thing, we wanted log so we build log. For me, I learned a long time ago that it works better when i donít have to ever think i wish I would have done it different or I would have rather had. I donít think cost of difference is all that much.
    Warming up the cabin is not a problem. We have a lot of time and money invested and feel that if we ever did have to sell that the retail and sale ability would be considerably more than the difference in upfront material costs.
    The cabin has been up a few years now and I still havenít gotten to finish it. Most logs are peeled but still lots of cambium. My plan is to power wash them , let em dry should be less tha week. Then caulk n top coat.
    Bears are always an issue, log is stronger .
    There are freight hauling companies that around that have the sleds and machines and do good work. Give them a call so you can be more informed. Time is money. But mostly, it is what we wanted, so thatís what we did. Good luck when you build your cabin.

  9. #29

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    late on this debate, but I am currently building stick built 2x6 and drywall inside on a monoslab. Mainly as this is what I am used to building with so comfort level is high. What also changed this is that I went to 2 story with a garage below, where my original plans were a single story log kit on post and beam. However next year its getting the half log siding treatment

  10. #30

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    Anyone try any of the local (AK state) cabin log kits? I'm wanting to build a cabin on my property but have little time. My summer is eaten up by work. I'm leaning toward stick build for quickness of getting the structure up and working the interior during the winter. Maybe mill down the wood around the property to use as siding for the "log" look.

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