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Thread: Looking for a mentor

  1. #21
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NRick View Post
    When did they start doing that? My 3rd class expired a long time ago but I don't remember a drug test.
    As far as I know the urine test is checking for health issues, sugar, blood in urine and not for drugs. A drug test requires notice and chain of custody.
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"

  2. #22
    Member polardds's Avatar
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    BRWNBR,

    If you wait for the time and money you will never do it. None of our hobbies make financial sense.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    Well I sat down with the wife and laid out my whole plan/timeline/budget/anything I could foresee this entailing. Got a resounding. Uh. No. Once she realized I was gonna have to be gone more to build time before we could use the plane the idea got nixed. So close. Crap. ...

    Give something up to make the prospect more palatable to her. I cut out some monthly expenditures to show my dedication. Gave up my motorcycle, which she hated anyway. Plus, I didn't really ask permission- easier to beg forgiveness. Lol. Of course, I didn't propose buying a plane at the same time, just training costs..the plane came come later...after I pay off a car and tell her it all comes out in the wash. Haha..

  4. #24
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NRick View Post
    When did they start doing that? My 3rd class expired a long time ago but I don't remember a drug test.
    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    As far as I know the urine test is checking for health issues, sugar, blood in urine and not for drugs. A drug test requires notice and chain of custody.
    Oops! My mistake. Steve is right. I was just thinking through my recent medical and the urine test came to mind. I don't have anything to hide, so didn't give a second thought as to the purpose.

  5. #25

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    The good old days when the Great State of Alaska, paid 90% of all costs for Private, Commercial, Single and Multi-engine, land and sea, instrument, and type ratings. And many schools would grant you a 10% discount........so your total net-net-net cost was ZERO.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    The good old days when the Great State of Alaska, paid 90% of all costs for Private, Commercial, Single and Multi-engine, land and sea, instrument, and type ratings. And many schools would grant you a 10% discount........so your total net-net-net cost was ZERO.

    WOW!! I didn't know they did that..that would be quite an incentive for getting more pilots trained. I assume it was only open to residents...or people that would commit to staying in-state for a certain amount of time..I'd certainly do it.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by WannaBfromSC View Post
    WOW!! I didn't know they did that..that would be quite an incentive for getting more pilots trained. I assume it was only open to residents...or people that would commit to staying in-state for a certain amount of time..I'd certainly do it.
    Yes.......Residents. It was "ALL" education. Truck driver school, Beauty school, University, etc.. Was back in the early 80's.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Yes.......Residents. It was "ALL" education. Truck driver school, Beauty school, University, etc.. Was back in the early 80's.

    Seems like with all I keep hearing about shortages, etc. someone would put something like that together to get more people interested. I know there are a few scholarships, and loans, etc. but I don't know that it is making much of a difference overall..
    I am not personally interested in large airline job. My interest lies in smaller carriers, cargo, etc. If a smaller company would put something like that together I'd love to do it. Right now it is going to take me forever to get any flying time in..

  9. #29

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    The trick to building flight hours is planning!! Plan to fly every day. Know what the weather is doing and grab every hour you can. Winter flying, means lots of prep time, but for a club plane once it is hot next pilot has short preflight and go. Always pull the power back when you are flying, you want to build time not be the fastest!! Fly in crappy weather, wind, early in the morning (preflight in the dark) when no one else wants the plane, long 6 hr cross country flights are great time builders. Go to the runway and fly with all the old guys. But the real key is every night before you go to bed be ready to fly (Check weather, plane, fuel) the next day and get it done!! If you are single stay that way or find a girlfriend with two jobs so she does not have a lot of time for you.
    DENNY

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by boneguy View Post
    ..or find a girlfriend with two jobs so she does not have a lot of time for you.
    DENNY

    That would serve 2 purposes..keeps her busy, plus helps fund the endeavor. Lol. Time and money are my obstacles..I guess everyone's for that matter. Trying to get in a few hundred hours at 100 bucks per hour really adds up. Right now I am still working on PPL, so paying a CFI ads to that cost. I guess you do what you can..slow and steady..

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by WannaBfromSC View Post
    Seems like with all I keep hearing about shortages, etc. someone would put something like that together to get more people interested. I know there are a few scholarships, and loans, etc. but I don't know that it is making much of a difference overall..
    I am not personally interested in large airline job. My interest lies in smaller carriers, cargo, etc. If a smaller company would put something like that together I'd love to do it. Right now it is going to take me forever to get any flying time in..
    It wasn't quite as cut & dried as one might think: It was more a guaranteed loan program: if you met certain criteria, you could borrow $$ from the State (some variant of the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education). The degree program had to be a formal and recognized training program that (IIRC and I probably don't) resulted in at least a 2-year degree if not 4-year degree AND only certain types of programs and certain expenses related thereto were eligible for the loans and ultimately forgiveness. THEN if you returned to AK for a certain period of years, the loans were forgiven.

    I seem to recall from the AOPA magazine as well as others that many of the megacenters in the L48 offer near-100% financing on flight training that results in Commercial or above ratings.....but even with the increasing salaries, not sure that anything short of left seat in a regional amounts to a wage that will allow one to live and still repay loans.
    Back in AK

  12. #32
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    Jake,
    I would recommend taking an introductory flight at a local school, which usually cost around $100, and then see if you catch the bug. I've seen a couple of guys just go out and buy a plane before any kind of lessons, only to figure out that they don't really like to fly. Or scare the crap out of themselves and figure out the expensive way they would rather pay someone to fly them around.
    If you decide you do want to fly, you'll need to decide what type of training you will get. Part 61 or Part 141. There are advantages and disadvantages to each, and recommend you google it to figure out what best suites you. I went through ProFlite in Fairbanks, which is a Part 141 school, and had my license in around 3 months, working a slope schedule. The best advice I can give is fly, fly and fly. Every day if you can. You will have good days, and you will have days that will make you want to cry.
    Just my personal opinion, but get your license and then buy a plane. You will have enough to keep you busy during this time and will give you the opportunity to try out a bunch of planes to see what you will eventually want. There are headaches to owning a plane, unexpected maintenance, annuals, tie-downs, etc.. that's just a bunch of added stress you don't need at that time. JMO
    By the way, I have 5 kids. LOL

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Yes.......Residents. It was "ALL" education. Truck driver school, Beauty school, University, etc.. Was back in the early 80's.
    I went through UAF in the early 80s, using State of Alaska student loans (aviation). They were a 50% forgiveness loan. You had to graduate, stay in Alaska for five years and not be in default on your student loans. The IRS came out later and declared that you now owed taxes on the forgiven amount... It was a good deal if you got a job after graduating and paid things off. Not so good if you were a screw-off...

  14. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by pipercub View Post
    I went through UAF in the early 80s, using State of Alaska student loans (aviation). They were a 50% forgiveness loan. You had to graduate, stay in Alaska for five years and not be in default on your student loans. The IRS came out later and declared that you now owed taxes on the forgiven amount... It was a good deal if you got a job after graduating and paid things off. Not so good if you were a screw-off...
    I could be wrong, but I kind'a think there were different programs for so called "trade schools" then for university students, at least when the program first started. It (the loan program) also was in rapid and constant change especially the first couple years. In the beginning the state sent the money to the trade schools, but they would go broke, or disappear with the money.

    Then it changed, and they would send the money directly to me, and I would use several different flight schools. I
    would negotiate with schools or flight service companies to buy a "Block" of hours in a complex single or multi-engine air craft. The school or flight service company would then lease that air craft from someone or some business. I also owned several companies, so this was all a valid business expense for my companies.

  15. #35
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    I remember the discussion about whether or not the loan money had to be kept on account with the school. I got my Comm/Inst. at a school on Merrill Field in the early 80's. The owner insisted that all the money needed to stay on the schools account, he later split the state with all the funds. Luckily I'd flown off all the money on my account, many others weren't so lucky and were still responsible for paying back the loan.
    Louis Knapp

  16. #36
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I can't answer all of your questions, but as to ground school before flying, you can start flying right away. You need to pass your FAA written exam and have a valid medical certificate before soloing, but you can start logging hours with an instructor as soon as you'd like. You might as well get going on the ground school/self study, though, as once you start flying you should fly as often as possible. It's best to fly multiple times a week during the process so as to stay sharp/learn quickly. If you do so, you'll be flying solo in no time.
    If the FAA written part is true, several CFI's around here are doing it wrong. We supplied housing for a student pilot this summer and she passed her FAA written well after her solo. She said she was required to perform some sort of knowledge test with the CFI, but not the official FAA written. It's pretty cool to see the excitement in a 16 y.o. that just soloed.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  17. #37
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    If the FAA written part is true, several CFI's around here are doing it wrong. We supplied housing for a student pilot this summer and she passed her FAA written well after her solo. She said she was required to perform some sort of knowledge test with the CFI, but not the official FAA written. It's pretty cool to see the excitement in a 16 y.o. that just soloed.
    Well, dang. I guess I should stop giving advice on the process of getting one's license. It was 20 years ago for me, and apparently I've got some of the details mixed up.

    Thanks for the correction.

  18. #38
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Many CFIs tell their students that they need to pass the FAA written before they solo. That is not really true as far as the FAA is concerned....

    The student must have a medical, and must pass a written pre-solo test that is devised by the CFI. This rule came about in mid-summer of 1989.

    Part 61.87 states a student pilot must demonstrate satisfactory aeronautical knowledge on a knowledge test.
    The knowledge test must address the student pilotís knowledge of:

    Applicable sections of parts 61 and 91
    Airspace rules and procedures for the airport where the solo flight will be performed
    Flight characteristics and operational limitations for the make and model of aircraft to be flown.

    The student's authorized instructor must administer the test and at the conclusion of the test, review all incorrect answers with the student before authorizing that student to conduct a solo flight.


    I have a couple tests like that in my computer that I made up. And of course I tailor them to the aircraft being flown and to the airports being used.

    Some lazy CFIs will insist on the FAA written before solo and think they are covered..... HOWEVER, the FAA written does not address the aircraft being used , nor the specific airports the CFI is expecting the student to use.

    However there is nothing wrong with the CFI insisting that the client take the FAA written if they can pass it. ( before solo ) it is a business decision of sorts. In case something goes wrong during a solo, the CFI can point to the Federal Exam and say, " Hey the U.S. Govt' said my client has the knowledge for a private pilot. "
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
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