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Thread: bone/meat saw

  1. #1
    Member summitx's Avatar
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    Default bone/meat saw

    Was wondering what a good bone/meat saw would be, what do you guys use, is there something out there that is light and compact.

  2. #2

    Default Saw

    When weight isn't an issue, a cordless sawzall with a coarse, long wood blade works the best!

  3. #3

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    I carry a wyoming saw. It has been useful hunting and snowmobiling. Light and compact. Basically it is just a colapsable hack saw with a wood cutting blade too.

  4. #4
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    Default

    I use a Wyoming II saw. It has a meat and a wood blade, is compact yet long enough to take the skull cap off a moose. I also have a small one I got from the North American hunting club that works but not quite as well.

  5. #5
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    Wyoming saw hands down. Used it for years with no issues!

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    Default

    Ditto on the Wyoming saw. I have the original but I think the longer one would be a little better. But, I've done a lot of moose with mine.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  7. #7
    Member aktoklat's Avatar
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    Default Best Saw

    Coghlan's Sierra Folding saw works best for me. It allows one to get to difficult places like sawing through the skull of a Moose or Caribou to remove the antlers with part of the skull cap intact.

  8. #8
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    Default

    Light enough, compact enough, and more capable than the gadget saws I've used.

    http://www.stanleytools.com/default....Heavy+Duty+Saw

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    Default Sears Craftsman

    Go down to your local Sears store and pick up a small crosscut saw. They're about 15 inches long and have a plastic handle. Weight is minimal and they do a good job sawing off skull plates or butchering an animal. Don't laugh! They work and are lots cheaper than buying a "backpacking" type saw.

    Or...what Mr Pid said! I just clicked on his link.

  10. #10

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    how much do those cost? I only paid about $20 for my wyoming saw.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Light enough, compact enough, and more capable than the gadget saws I've used.

    http://www.stanleytools.com/default....Heavy+Duty+Saw
    Looks like it would work fine but it isnt very compact and the teeth are exposed. I would go back to the wyoming or a folding saw. IMO

  12. #12
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Default I'm in the market too...

    but a wyoming saw is too heavy for me. I found a collapseable saw with a 20" blade at B&J but they didn't have replacement blades. A bow saw is good but it has exposed teeth.

    Tim

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    Default Where are you hunting?

    If I am on a boat or motorized access trip, I plan on using a chainsaw as my primary bone saw. Either cut back the bar oil usage or drain it and add vegetable oil. Is a bit of a mess to clean, but very little meat is lost and I have never had an issue using it.
    My back up or backpacking saw is a folding pruning saw. Coglan's makes a camping model, but Gerber and others make them too. Have to check each model, but a bunch use interchangeable blades.
    Just about any saw designed for wood will go through bone easily. No need to use a hacksaw as the teeth are too fine and get clogged.
    A thread a while back was asking much the same question but related to remote hunts. I suggested looking at Sears for a knife/saw kit they have. The saw blades are about 4" long. The whole thing, including a spare blade would be extremely light weight.

  14. #14
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Default

    Ditto the sierra saw. Light and under 10 buck at your local Walmart. Also no back to get caught on skull caps.

  15. #15
    Member Ebbtide's Avatar
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    Default Meat Saws

    I too have used a wyoming saw for years and found it almost flawless. One year I lost the wingnut which pretty much rendered the saw useless while in the field. It was easy to fix back at home but... Another saw you may want to check out is called "sawvivor". could not find a webpage but a simple google search should pull it up for you. The blade slides in the bar and the handles fold overmaking it easier to pack and lightweight with no teeth exposed.

  16. #16
    Member KRS's Avatar
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    I carry and use a small hatchet, always have. That's how grandpa did it

  17. #17
    Member summitx's Avatar
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    Default

    looks like I need to check out the wyo saw, have something like it but kinda small. Thanks

  18. #18

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    a chain saw works great!!! just make sure you wear googles!!!

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    Default

    The cost on the Craftsman/Stanley type saw was about $10 when I bought the last one......a few months ago. It comes with a slide on protector to cover the teeth so they aren't exposed. My back pack has a water bladder compartment (which I don't use) and this saw fits perfectly in there. I do have a Wyoming saw, but once I started using the crosscut saw it's all I take now.

  20. #20
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Light enough, compact enough, and more capable than the gadget saws I've used.

    http://www.stanleytools.com/default....Heavy+Duty+Saw
    I think this year I am going to give this saw a try. Lighter than the Wym saw with no parts to lose, Pretty good idea.
    Tennessee

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