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Thread: Bow Hunting Tips for Beginners

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    Default Bow Hunting Tips for Beginners

    The article on this site 10 Best Bow Hunting Tips for Beginners is a really nice one.
    Bow hunting depends on many things such as individual ability, the target animal, bow strength, bow length, arrow, terrain, weather, etc and all of this things are clearly elaborate on this article.
    Bow lovers and also beginners are hopefully helpful in this article.


    Just try to help my friends...
    Adam Howard

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    Learn how to blood trail.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Member Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    I would add that if you are having a shooting issue, "Only change one thing at a time to correct the issue." IF you change two or more you don't know which change was the correct one, or if it was the combination of the two that corrected the problem.

    Also, practice for real hunting situations if possible. Wear the clothing you plan on hunting in. Shoot animal targets. Use broadheads if possible. Practice up hill, down hill, kneeling... As real as possible.

    Hillary moved to NY and I moved out.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    I would add that if you are having a shooting issue, "Only change one thing at a time to correct the issue." IF you change two or more you don't know which change was the correct one, or if it was the combination of the two that corrected the problem.

    Also, practice for real hunting situations if possible. Wear the clothing you plan on hunting in. Shoot animal targets. Use broadheads if possible. Practice up hill, down hill, kneeling... As real as possible.
    Good advice.
    Shooting at 3D targets setup at unknown distances. Walk around and choose a sight pin before you check the distance with a range finder. Change the angle of the shot, etc.

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    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    I would say my number one tip is that for your first hunt, make sure you go with an experienced archer who know what to do after you let that arrow fly. Someone that can teach you how to now relax and wait if need be. How to track. Etc., etc..
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger45 View Post
    I would say my number one tip is that for your first hunt, make sure you go with an experienced archer who know what to do after you let that arrow fly. Someone that can teach you how to now relax and wait if need be. How to track. Etc., etc..
    I have coached plenty of people for archery and firearms. It amazes me the number of people that go out hunting and have no clue how to track wounded game. The first thing I usually have to jump them about is for getting in front of the tracker. Don't disturb my trail. Most people couldn't begin to tell you exactly where they last laid eyes on their fleeing animal or where it was when the shot was taken. Those are the very first concepts new hunter should learn.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by adamhoward View Post
    The article on this site 10 Best Bow Hunting Tips for Beginners is a really nice one.
    Bow hunting depends on many things such as individual ability, the target animal, bow strength, bow length, arrow, terrain, weather, etc and all of this things are clearly elaborate on this article.
    Bow lovers and also beginners are hopefully helpful in this article.


    Just try to help my friends...


    I informally help-out numerous "beginners" at different ranges. Here are some thoughts:

    1. Don't "macho" your bow draw weight. Many young guys set up their bows at draw weights they have trouble handling.
    2. Shoot often but shoot less. Meaning, don't shoot at one sitting too much. Five 20 arrow sessions are better than one 100 arrow session.
    3. Don't buy inferior equipment because of price. Save your money and buy the good stuff!
    4. Buy small balloons and substitute them for paper targets. Will keep your interest more than the paper targets. Particularly if the wind is blowing.
    5. Avoid sight pin clutter. A few pins or, maybe a single pin sight is better.
    6. Try out different releases. Beware of super light trigger releases.
    7. Buy a few super quality arrows not lots of cheap arrows. Cheap arrows fly erratically and will confuse you.
    8. If you buy a used bow, make sure you take a very experience trusted person with you. There are a lot of damaged bows sold at bargain prices.
    9. Know your effective range. Meaning, where you can hit a small paper plate EVERY TIME regardless of conditions.
    10. Avoid the I can "Robin Hood" my arrows at a 20 yard range BS. It does not generalize to the hunting field.
    11. Other........

    8.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    I would add that if you are having a shooting issue, "Only change one thing at a time to correct the issue." IF you change two or more you don't know which change was the correct one, or if it was the combination of the two that corrected the problem.

    Also, practice for real hunting situations if possible. Wear the clothing you plan on hunting in. Shoot animal targets. Use broadheads if possible. Practice up hill, down hill, kneeling... As real as possible.
    Or use traditional equipment, stick and a string, the only thing that will need adjusting in the shooter

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chez View Post
    Or use traditional equipment, stick and a string, the only thing that will need adjusting in the shooter
    And that's not entirely true either, if you want to shoot well anyhow.

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    What do you guys do for scent control?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sheepcrazy View Post
    What do you guys do for scent control?

    Since spot and stalk is 99% of my hunting, just watch the wind and crawl a lot....knee pads really help....

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    Quote Originally Posted by sheepcrazy View Post
    What do you guys do for scent control?
    . Honestly, nothing. My breath smells bad enough that I doubt doing anything with my clothes would help.

    My biggest advice I can offer to any archer is that you cannot buy accuracy. Endlessly chasing new bows, new arrows, new broadheads, new sights etc.. will not help if you don't practice. Buy solid equipment the first time around, take care of it, and enjoys the $$ savings. This advice is coming from a guy that chased all those things in both bowhunting and target shooting.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sheepcrazy View Post
    What do you guys do for scent control?
    All clothes get washed in Scent Shield 2-3 times per week. Base layers get changed daily. Every evening returning to the truck I spray everything again with Scent Shield. Spray again in the morning before heading to the stand. We carry pee bottles, so after going we spray again and the bottle goes into a zip lock bag. If the apples are ripe I'll step on a couple going to my stand. This is for whitetails on my propertyin NY. I bow hunt about 2 months a year there.

    Hillary moved to NY and I moved out.


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    I just want to thank you for sharing this informative post with us.

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    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    Try to set up a target that is easily gotten to daily. Make a promise to yourself that you will shoot at lest six arrows a day at this target, regardless of weather. You will shoot in hot, cold, wet, windy, snowy days, kind of like real life :-) I have a target set off to the side of my driveway as I have lots of room. I mainly shoot it at 20 yards, but can do less or stretch it out to 60 yards. Pay attention to form over exact placement. Have a target that is the size where you can hit something as big as a pie plate daily (the size of a moose's or caribou's vitals area. Six arrows gets you into the daily habit of shooting without over doing it.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Attitude. Keep it positive, and set lower goals. In archery, you will see a lot more animals that you are not able to get a clean shot at than you do rifle hunting. Know your effective range, and don't exceed that in the field! Practicing in different scenarios will lock in your range, and allow you to slowly expand it. But if you aren't comfortable at a certain range in front of a paper plate, you sure won't be good in a field scenario with adrenalin pumping through you. Don't get down on yourself for passing a shot that isn't right, or waiting too long for a clean shot and getting no opportunity. Hunting ethics when archery hunting require larger shooting lanes, closer ranges, and a body angle that avoids large bones. Learn to take joy in getting within range of an animal, even if no shot presents itself. If you have to put game on the ground to feel satisfied with your hunt, archery is not for you. On the flip side, the rush of getting within bow range of a large big game animal, and successfully harvesting it, is like no other. It is hard to ever achieve the same rush with a rifle. Knowing this, makes it easier to stick to the archery game, even when going home with an un notched tag.

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    Practice how you hunt. I like to take the arrow from a quiver each time. Also try doing some pushups and get your heart rate up a little.

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    Put rubber blunts on your banged up arrows and use them to take grouse and small game.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    I use all my old arrows that I have 2 or 3 on left. My odd lot of arrows is just close enough splined that at hare distances it just doesn't matter. Rubber blunts work better than turkey heads or judo points.

    Hillary moved to NY and I moved out.


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