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Thread: This will be a great ELK load

  1. #1

    Default This will be a great ELK load

    300WBY mag 180gr TSX moving 3287fps 4317ft pounds of energy at muzzle, 2,081ft pounds of energy at 600yds. Sight in at +3" high at 100yds, dead on at 315yds, -10" at 425yds, then hold on top of shoulder at 430yds and hit out to 510yds. With BDC hit out to 630yrds. Result should be=DEAD ELK=ONE SHOT!!!! This will be fun to try, and also on black bear.
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  2. #2

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    No experience with the TSX to prove my point, but based on experience with other premiums at long range I'd worry a lot about that bullet expanding sufficiently out at the far end of your range. The elk may die after one shot, but as the range stretches past 400, I'd be prepared for it to take a while to decide it was dead.

  3. #3
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    Beartooth,

    Your excitement shows though, this is a fun hobby, huh?

    I have to wonder, why 3287 fps? Why the 315 yard zero and what is the MO for that shot? It is three inches high at 100 where is it at the bread and butter range of 200-250 yards? At what velocity do you know the Barnes TXS to be a reliable expanding bullet?

    Further, I don't think you can see even a big elk at 630 yards. I still have very good eyes and am a pretty good shot, but I would never attempt such a shot. He's not going to just drop at the shot and you won't be able to follow up from such a distance. Is this just optimal thinking? I've made shots at 600+ yards but didn't give a rip whether it was a wound or a drop. I care more about an elk. Certainly in good elk country it is less likely to even have a 600 yard open shot, but even if spotted at that range, we should be able to get closer. And what is with the energy figures you give at yonder ranges? What does that do for us?
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    No experience with the TSX to prove my point, but based on experience with other premiums at long range I'd worry a lot about that bullet expanding sufficiently out at the far end of your range. The elk may die after one shot, but as the range stretches past 400, I'd be prepared for it to take a while to decide it was dead.
    It will open and expand at 1800fps and my load at 700yds is 2135fps and at the farthest I would shoot I still have 2237fps, it will do the job.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    Beartooth,

    Your excitement shows though, this is a fun hobby, huh?

    I have to wonder, why 3287 fps? Why the 315 yard zero and what is the MO for that shot? It is three inches high at 100 where is it at the bread and butter range of 200-250 yards? At what velocity do you know the Barnes TXS to be a reliable expanding bullet?

    Further, I don't think you can see even a big elk at 630 yards. I still have very good eyes and am a pretty good shot, but I would never attempt such a shot. He's not going to just drop at the shot and you won't be able to follow up from such a distance. Is this just optimal thinking? I've made shots at 600+ yards but didn't give a rip whether it was a wound or a drop. I care more about an elk. Certainly in good elk country it is less likely to even have a 600 yard open shot, but even if spotted at that range, we should be able to get closer. And what is with the energy figures you give at yonder ranges? What does that do for us?
    At 200yds 3.98" high, 250yds 2.96" high, 300yds .85" high, and highest point in trajectory is 4.11" at 175"
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  6. #6

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    I hit a deer at 618yds with a Ruger #1 300WBY mag in front of my guide and was in the chest and out the other side last Oct. And I saw the deer fine with my eyes standing on a ridge across a big canyon. The sky was behind him and it made it easy.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  7. #7
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    im thinking someone just likes to test out loads on animals at extreme ranges,just because the "math seems right".Just my opinion.............uh oh...here comes the flak...............

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by danthedewman1 View Post
    im thinking someone just likes to test out loads on animals at extreme ranges,just because the "math seems right".Just my opinion.............uh oh...here comes the flak...............
    not only is the math right the blood was red
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    I hit a deer at 618yds with a Ruger #1 300WBY mag in front of my guide and was in the chest and out the other side last Oct. And I saw the deer fine with my eyes standing on a ridge across a big canyon. The sky was behind him and it made it easy.
    Of course that was offhand in a strong wind and I used open sights, It was a snap shot!

    Kinda of reminds me of reading outdoor life back in the 1950's!

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    Of course that was offhand in a strong wind and I used open sights, It was a snap shot!

    Kinda of reminds me of reading outdoor life back in the 1950's!
    No it was not in the wind it was a still evening and it was not a snap shot and it was rested. I really am not going to try and convince anyone on this forum that I can shoot and have done so. I think there is a place for those of us who work real hard at shooting long distance and practice at it all year to make the shots that we make. Knowing our loads, rifles, and the circumstances that present them self at certain moments is of the up most consideration in doing so and being successful.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  11. #11
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    Im not doubting your ability to hit a target,or animal.Im just saying we as hunters owe it to the animals we hunt to put them down quickly.And taking shots at those ranges doesnt always produce the best results.And you could have to follow a wounded animal for a mile or more before it collapses,,if you find it at all.Its not about just having that bullet reach the animal.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by danthedewman1 View Post
    Im not doubting your ability to hit a target,or animal.Im just saying we as hunters owe it to the animals we hunt to put them down quickly.And taking shots at those ranges doesnt always produce the best results.And you could have to follow a wounded animal for a mile or more before it collapses,,if you find it at all.Its not about just having that bullet reach the animal.
    Yes, you are correct and sometimes very short shots even though in the right place produce situations where you have to track an animal for a long ways. I take what I know I can hit whether up close or far off since even some of the best medium shots have also produced a situation where you have to track an animal for a long ways. Nothings perfect out there and close shots don't produce garuntees, in fact if one has hunted much at all he knows that short shots can be very unpredictable. I agree with you to knock the animal down quick and have quick kills but that does not happen 100% of the time, it could only happen in a perfect world. I would not take long shots if I did not practiced with the load and know that I have the bullet to do the job and enough energy to go along with the proper bullet as well as making good shot.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  13. #13
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    Default Elk Loads

    I would opt for 200 grain bullets in the 300 WBY, such as Swift A-Frames, on elk. I've always wondered why the 200 grain bullets aren't more popular in the fast 30 caliber chamberings. I have taken several elk and they are tough animals. I like 225 grain A-Frames in my 338 WM. I have taken elk with smaller calibers, but I like the knock down of the 338 and the performance of the A-Frames. I've had a hard time getting the Barnes Bullets to shoot well in my rifles. I would also question the ethics of 600 yard shots. I have practiced at 500 and 600 meters with a very accurate 7 mag hunting rifle and was happy when I could routienly hit a 24 inch dia gong at that distance.

    Woody

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wa Woody View Post
    I would opt for 200 grain bullets in the 300 WBY, such as Swift A-Frames, on elk. I've always wondered why the 200 grain bullets aren't more popular in the fast 30 caliber chamberings. I have taken several elk and they are tough animals. I like 225 grain A-Frames in my 338 WM. I have taken elk with smaller calibers, but I like the knock down of the 338 and the performance of the A-Frames. I've had a hard time getting the Barnes Bullets to shoot well in my rifles. I would also question the ethics of 600 yard shots. I have practiced at 500 and 600 meters with a very accurate 7 mag hunting rifle and was happy when I could routienly hit a 24 inch dia gong at that distance.

    Woody
    Ethics! Yes! If you can hit that far and done so and practice at those distance it is fine. If one can not it is not. Some can't hit at 100yds very well and some can hit at 800yds very well. Yes, it is a matter of ETHICS.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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  15. #15

    Default Hoo Boy

    Gentlemen,

    I say again there is no sense in trying to deal rationally and sensibly when the situation does not make it worthwhile. There are some cases where it just isn't worth wasting energy on. Sometimes just the two words "That's nice." are all that are worth saying. I do know it reminds me of why I am very selective on who I go hunting with. IMHO

  16. #16
    Member KRS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    I hit a deer at 618yds with a Ruger #1 300WBY mag in front of my guide and was in the chest and out the other side last Oct. And I saw the deer fine with my eyes standing on a ridge across a big canyon. The sky was behind him and it made it easy.
    I'm glad I wasn't standing behind/below the animal.

    What ever happened to a proper backstop 'eh?

    KRS

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    Smile Making the shot...

    I don't think we should be too hard on Beartooth.

    He obviously does his homework. It develops loads and studies the ballistics. He does his testing over different ranges and we don't know that he isn't capable of such a shot. The facts are that a number of people are quite routinely capable of making such a shot. We can argue that it may or not be an ethical way to take an animal, given greater potential for wounding or loss, but we really can't speak to the issue that involves his capability and for sake of harmony we should take him at his word. Just as we do for the experiences others. We don't know each other or our capabilities and it isn't a good idea to try to shade somebody you don't know. If beartooth wants to hunt that way or be prepared to take that shot, and he can make it, where's the problem with that? And besides there is nothing work with a good hunting story.

    There was a post sometime back; 'What was your most memorable shot?" In that were many good stories of long shots, some quite questionable. I learned a long time ago not to say "it can't be done", because soon you may just get to watch it.

    Yeah, I can still see an elk, even a small one at 600 or more but in elk country I don't think I could follow up so would pass up such a shot if I couldn't get closer. I did make an over four hundred with my 338 Lapua on a good bull onece upon a time. I shot all the way through him with a 250 grain A-frame. He did not run.

    There was a time when people paid me to make such shots, one way or another. If you bet somebody they can't make a shot...and they do...it is a real good idea to pay up.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by KRS View Post
    I'm glad I wasn't standing behind/below the animal.

    What ever happened to a proper backstop 'eh?

    KRS
    Bless your heart, try and find something else, is it jealousy, what is it, is it that you can't make that shot. There was no access behind the deer since my position let me see his profile while standing on a ridge that rose up between us and just another 400yds the mountain gradually rose another 800ft. On top of that there is no way anyone could have access from the other side of the mountain considering it is all but straight down on the other side. Amazing, just amazing. 20 miles out in the middle of no where with only one way in and you think of a question like that without even finding out just so you can find some way to try an put down my shot and make it an issue of ethics.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  19. #19

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    I would like to say the following. I know many of you on this forum can hunt, shoot, and know a whole lot about the subject. I enjoy reading your post and love to hear your hunting stories. You are passionate about what you believe and with good reason from your experiences and I do respect those experiences and knowledge. Infact I wish I was on some of the hunts you guys were on. Now I have not hunted Alaska yet. But I have been in contact with a guide service and it will cost me 10,500 for a combined hunt. Hopefully this coming 2008 if details can be worked out I will have the great opportunity to hunt in Alaska. I have been in Africa and many states in the US and I can't wait to hunt in Alaska and have a great time. I don't know any of you but I take you at your word. I don't agree with everything I have read about shooting and hunting. My yes is my yes and my no is my no and that is how God wants it and I was raised that way. Now if I have offended anyone with my passion and opinions I am sorry, but as for what I know I have done and am able to do I am not sorry for that. I hope to have many more good times on this forum because I like to read the stuff because of my interest in Alaska. just beartooth
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  20. #20

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    Murphy, thank you for your kindness and consideration.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

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