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Thread: Sheep hunting: Do you bring a device to charge the inreache/phone (camera)/GPS?

  1. #21
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Agl thereís a lot of truth to what your saying. However I donít think gizmo and gadgets are really the reason for the changes we seen in Alaskaís wilderness. Iíve only got 30 years of hunting big game in Alaska. Grew up in the back seat of a J-3
    Cub with my dad over the unit 13 country. It has certainly changed and not in a way that gets me all excited. Iíve preached forever alaska is headed to a draw system, at some point we will be much more similar to the lower 48 game management practices. Because alaska will be full of people from the lower 48 and the mentality from those current systems will become more and more accepted.

    I do not think a gps/inReach/range finders are the problems though.
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  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post

    I do not think a gps/inReach/range finders are the problems though.
    Two different issues. As was pointed out by "Coldfoot" in a post above, Todays hunters are not Outdoorsmen. My guess is that most hunters envision themselves as "Outdoorsmen". Hence the electric tools. It does not matter, and hunters have no interest in or need to have outdoorsmen skills.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Two different issues. As was pointed out by someone in a post above, Todays hunters are not Outdoorsmen. My guess is that most hunters envision themselves as "Outdoorsmen". Hence the electric tools.


    Where do you set the bottom of the sliding scale of judgment on who is an outdoorsman? Davey Crockett? You? Fred bear? How far back do we need to go to make this a fair assessment of hunters today? What are fisherman now? Pilots? Chefs, school teachers. Crap the list goes on. There are advancements that change things from the beginning of the first hammer, matches, your compass, the topo map, plastic, brass cartridges, batteries, gps, led light, sat phoned, humans use advancements. Thatís what we do. But to say it makes someone less of a hunter or outdoorsman than another is elementary. Maybe less tough or rugged or self sufficient sure. But every generation is less than something of the one before it. Your generation wasnt the peak because you didnít need a battery and neither is mine because I have batteries.
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  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    Where do you set the bottom of the sliding scale of judgment on who is an outdoorsman? Davey Crockett? You? Fred bear? How far back do we need to go to make this a fair assessment of hunters today? What are fisherman now? Pilots? Chefs, school teachers. Crap the list goes on. There are advancements that change things from the beginning of the first hammer, matches, your compass, the topo map, plastic, brass cartridges, batteries, gps, led light, sat phoned, humans use advancements. Thatís what we do. But to say it makes someone less of a hunter or outdoorsman than another is elementary. Maybe less tough or rugged or self sufficient sure. But every generation is less than something of the one before it. Your generation wasnt the peak because you didnít need a battery and neither is mine because I have batteries.
    It is not about different generations, or the evolution of tools. It is unchanged over time........it is about skills, a give set of skills. A specific set of skills. A "Outdoorsman" can be naked and have NO tools or implements, but can function as an "Outdoorsman", because he/she has the necessary skill set.

    You can give another person a mountain of equipment and they will fail. Your basic "Infantryman" has more "Outdoorsman" skills then hunters. The main point is that to be a hunter, you do not need any "Outdoorsman" or "Infantryman" skills. In fact with the right equipment, a person does not even need any hunting skills.

    I have in fact watched two people, who had never held a firearm......not ever. And the first time they held a firearm, the first time they ever pulled/squeezed a trigger they each dropped a Alaska Big Game animal. No hunting skill required in both of those cases.

  5. #25
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Iím so turned around now. I think I get your point but man.....Iím not sure this is worth it.
    Thereís been idiots in the woods since we had woods. That isnít gonna change. And skilled outdoorsman since we created indoors. That isnít gonna change either.
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  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    Iím so turned around now. I think I get your point but man.....Iím not sure this is worth it.
    Thereís been idiots in the woods since we had woods. That isnít gonna change. And skilled outdoorsman since we created indoors. That isnít gonna change either.
    You are NOT turned around at all. You fully understand the point.


    Here is a total unrelated (or maybe ever so slightly related) point. I once ran some hunts for a "Alaska Licensed REGSTRED Guide" who knew zero about hunting, or firearms or camping. And he was not ashamed to admit that fact.

  7. #27
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    I take my electronic gizmos as a convenience, not a necessity. Can get by just fine without it, just choose not to.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post

    There were places that had so much game, it looked like the plains of Africa during migration, and are now totally devoid of game. This was not over a hundred year period, this was over 18 or 12 or sometimes only 5 to 6 years.
    AGL - what do you attribute the reduction in game abundance to? Most sport hunting in remote areas targets mature males and should not reduce the overall populations substantially even if there are more hunters than before. If my math and understanding of federal predator control programs is accurate, I believe you started hunting Alaska at the tail end of those programs or shortly after they ended. Do you think there are now more predators and that is a major cause of the decrease? Or is the land just simply not as biologically productive perhaps because of fewer large fires?

    Sorry for going off topic but I found your posts here very interesting.

  9. #29
    Member coop22250's Avatar
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    I use the whisperlite. 2 cups of water with the wind guard in place takes .50 oz to boil. We just did a goat hunt, 6 days, oatmeal for breakfast, cold lunch, mnt house for dinner, well over half the 20oz bottle left.

  10. #30
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    Nothing wrong with innovation. Electronics do not make hunts easier. In fact I could argue the extra weight you have to take a long would be a burden. They do make hunts safer. I can look at a topo or cached sat image on my phone and pick a safe route to travel that I have never seen before. But there is still a skill set in being able to read a map and an image. But as far as someone being an "outdoors men" , an InReach isn't going to make or break someone. There is for sure a mentality that comes along with it. This is my 4th hunting season in Alaska and I have grown leaps and bounds. Not one thing due to any device, but due to time in the field.

  11. #31
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    I was schooled the other night as to my dependence on an electronic device. Before i get started i pride myself in being able to keep track of myself and always know where i am and which way back to the truck or camp. Anyone who has ever been out doors with me will agree that i have a good sense of direction. That being said i have an app on my phone that is a simple GPS. It is crazy handy as i usually have my phone for pictures anyway. I took a friend up the Steese the other night for a caribou. As we drove up the road we got to a popular pull out and i pulled up the binos. I immediately spotted caribou. With daylight fading fast we hurried to get the 4 wheelers unloaded and head up the trail before we lost too much light. In the hustle i left my phone in the pickup and that meant i had no GPS. I had never been in that particular area before but with good visibility i wasn't worried. That all changed about 15 minutes up the trail as fog rolled in and cut visibility to 250 yards max. We drove circles around this bald knob looking for caribou. They were around, it was a matter of identifying a bull and getting a couple of inexperienced hunters on them before they would vanish into the fog. After about 4-5 laps around the top of the mountain in the fog a mature bull was spotted and harvested. It was now 9:30 My level of anxiety was getting high. Sunset was only 45 minutes away and i knew we had traveled several miles from the pickup and the trail was nowhere in site. I was pretty confident in which way the truck was but i lacked the assurance to feel 100% confident. After a long lesson on proper field care of an animal we loaded it onto the 4 wheeler and headed back to where I hoped we'd find the trail which hopefully would lead to the truck as it was now after sunset and getting dark fast. My gut didn't let me down and we were on the trail in less than 600 yards. Did I need the GPS? No, would I have been more comfortable with it- you bet. How about the times when the GPS points you 180 degrees from true? Have you ever experienced that? What if the area screws up your compass? I hunted an area on the north slope a few years in a row that killed a GPS and a compass. Then what?

  12. #32
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Or when 18ídegrees of magnetic deviation tosses you off a bit.
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  13. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    Or when 18ídegrees of magnetic deviation tosses you off a bit.
    18 degrees would be an improvement for me. Most places I go hunting in AK have about 24-25 degree declination or more.

  14. #34
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    This GPS was a legit 180 degrees off. Garmin ended up replacing it under warranty. The compass spun completely 180 degrees backwards as well and never righted itself afterward either.

  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by sambuck12 View Post
    This GPS was a legit 180 degrees off. Garmin ended up replacing it under warranty. The compass spun completely 180 degrees backwards as well and never righted itself afterward either.
    Did you try re-magnetizing the needle of the compass? It happens, usually easy fix once you're home, just need a fairly powerful magnet.

    I've hunted with a guy that always had his compass screwed up. Finally realized he was storing it in a bino pack that had magnetic closures instead of zips/other

  16. #36

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    I love threads that (d)evolve into discussions about electronic technology and it's effect on current and future hunting. There's no escaping the totality of tech. It pervades everything in our lives whether we choose to see it or not. I've come to think of it (tech) as an essential attribute of the species (man) and we're actually only doing what evolution would have us do...advance. I scratch myself until I bleed over this, because I live, use and work in a world of technology...and I pursue the outdoor sports to get away from tech. After all...I hunt with a longbow and handmade (by me) fir arrows. I try like crazy to make my hunts and any kills about simplistic hunting values and abilities. I could do my 2 week backcountry solo hunt without any electronic comfort food if you follow. None of my hunts has ever depended upon my owning or bringing or using electronics to make them happen. In fact, I tend to take deliberate steps to make myself work harder and depend less on devices which soften the experience and effort needed.

    Still, I've got electronics in my gear. I'm a hypocrite to my own preferences. PLB, phone, battery bank, sat phone and such. In almost every case (for me) it's about safety or communication. I haven't found a way to take a photo without a battery in the camera. I can avoid wasting precious meat by calling my pilot for a pickup if necessary. I can get rescued with one push of a button if it becomes situation-critical. Is that a bad thing for my sport? How could a pilot fly without navigation and comms? How many ATVs have EFI, nav and on-board electronics? You get it: electronic tech is everywhere and largely unavoidable. You'd have to make a hardcore dedicated effort to do anything substantial without electronic technology playing a part in your overall story.

    Anyway, you won't find my camp looking like a Manhattan rooftop. No solar panels. No dish. One Zendure battery bank laying somewhere in the bottom of a duffle. You might catch me sending my wife a text message. I'll be touching up a few broadheads and shooting my longbow while I wait for a few excited electrons to arrive...her reply...and I'll smile when I hear that little beep.

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