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Thread: .500 Smith and Wesson Barrel Length

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amazer View Post
    Moose Chaser, BRWNBR summed it up well on bear stopper calibers/ handguns. Carry the handgun you are most comfortable carrying in the field. If you want a 500 S&W then carry it. As for you original question on barrel length it really doesn't matter much as the ballistic numbers are all week, choose the length you are most comfortable carrying and (most important) shooting. All handguns are week in the power factor, its about bullet placement and then penetration. A 3" or 4" barrel length is generally a very good carry and shooting length. I personally carry a RIA 1911 commander size (4.75") barrel in 10mm with BB 220gr hard cast. I shoot is very well and I have fast follow up shots. If I was one to carry a 500 S&W it would be in the 3-4" barrel length for better balance and shooting.
    Have you had to use your 10mm for defense from a bear?

  2. #22
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    I shot a grizz with mine once at 13 yards and backed up another at 180 yards once. I also shoot B.B. 220 hard csst in mine as well.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moose Chaser View Post
    Have you had to use your 10mm for defense from a bear?
    Moose Chaser, I have not used the 10mm in the field. I have done test with the 10mm BB vs 44mag BB. In the end I went with the 10mm as it penetrated as good as the 44mag but the 10mm was much more controllable and I shot it faster and more accurately. I have carried a pistol for over 22 years with my job and semiauto was just better for me. If I could shoot a 500S&W as accurate, fast and controllable as my 10mm I would switch. Whatever you decide to carry stick with a hard cast bullet so you have better penetration.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moose Chaser View Post
    Obviously the question was not "Stupid" to me or I would not of asked it. or are you now this site's Judge and Jury relative to questions asked? Seeing as that you're all knowing, what are the ballistic differences between the 4, 6.5, and 8.38" barrels? Go ahead and take your time; I wouldn't want to mentally stress you out.
    "All knowing" is a bit of a stretch, IMO, but thanks for the recognition. My "bear protection" handgun is a 4" Anaconda (44 mag), I load it with whatever heavy, hardcast bullets I can find. Accuracy at 10' isn't a question. Being able to have the gun in hand quickly is the name of the game. Intimate familiarity with the weapon is its middle name. I've never had to use it for the stated purpose, BUT carrying it gives me a sense of security that worth the pain in the butt it is to drag it along. As others have stated caliber, energy, knock down power ("wallop" I guess) is a distant second to being able to get on target quickly. If I was REALLY worried about defending myself (or those with me) from a bear attack, I'd be carrying a 375 H&H or a 12 ga stocked with slugs.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    Just a little logical common sense FYI about bear protection handguns. None will work every time unless the bullet goes into the right place. That being said almost any bullet in the right place will work. When A bear is coming down on you, the sole purpose of pulling a hog leg is to stay alive and Uninjured. A busted leg, muscle shot, broken toe, scary noise anything that turns a bear FROM you is a success. Folks get caught up in a “bear stopper”. There is no such thing. There is bear stopper shots, but no bear stopper calibers.
    Chances are if you have a handgun that you shoot well and handle well you will be more successful in those 7 seconds than you will be with a large heavy uncomfortable gun. 7 seconds might be generous.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    "All knowing" is a bit of a stretch, IMO, but thanks for the recognition. My "bear protection" handgun is a 4" Anaconda (44 mag), I load it with whatever heavy, hardcast bullets I can find. Accuracy at 10' isn't a question. Being able to have the gun in hand quickly is the name of the game. Intimate familiarity with the weapon is its middle name. I've never had to use it for the stated purpose, BUT carrying it gives me a sense of security that worth the pain in the butt it is to drag it along. As others have stated caliber, energy, knock down power ("wallop" I guess) is a distant second to being able to get on target quickly. If I was REALLY worried about defending myself (or those with me) from a bear attack, I'd be carrying a 375 H&H or a 12 ga stocked with slugs.

    These posts are right on. A 500 with a 4" barrel shooting heavy for caliber bullets will carry more "wallop" than a 44 with heavy bullets and an 8" barrell let alone 4". As has been stated, it's all about getting on target and getting the shot off. I would wager a 357, 41 mag, 44, or 10mm would all preform so long as the meat behind the trigger did their part. You can beat ballistics and "wallop" to death, the most important factor is how you handle yourself. Pick whatever firearm you are comfortable with carrying and getting on target, and practice.

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