Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 31 of 31

Thread: Use enough grinder

  1. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    108

    Default

    I'm on my second generic $100 grinder. First one lasted roughly 10 years from Costco. Bought the same one 2 years ago off amazon. Some grinders (like mine) have plastic gears that break when meat is frozen. Even when you think it's mostly thawed. Then you get to buy a new one. It is definitely a slow operation and meat needs to be cut into chunks before running through. Make sure internal parts are metal if you are going to buy a spendy one.

  2. #22
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    664

    Default

    Thanks, any sausage makers out there to comment on if you can go too big for sausage?

  3. #23
    Member logman 49's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Just South of Moose Pass
    Posts
    378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daveintheburbs View Post
    Thanks, any sausage makers out there to comment on if you can go too big for sausage?


    Having made a bunch of sausage with a 2 HP grinder, I can see no downside, it works excellent and goes very quickly.

  4. #24
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    9

    Default

    I have a older Biro 822 (1 hp)grinder that I use for everything. Very heavy and unstoppable. Doesn't even grunt when you try to overload it.
    A booger to clean but they are all same I think. I believe it is important that any suet be a least partially frozen. Suet grinds up finer and disperses better if it is partially frozen. Some grinders have issues with suet, I don't but I prefer my suet to be finer in the burger.
    I can see no downside to a larger grinder

  5. #25
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    1,039

    Default

    I would get a minimum of a 3/4 hp grinder.

    I've had up to a 5 hp... and the answer is time, not quality.

    bigger is faster.

    bigger can handle bigger pieces of meat...

    bigger is heavier, but easier to clean

    Chris

  6. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    fairbanks, ak
    Posts
    622

    Default

    I use a $35 dollar hand crank grinder that I removed the handle from and modified the bolt. Then i hooked up my corded drill to it and made myself a rather inexpensive multispeed grinder. It is quite fast. Last year grinding moose my hopper stuffer couldn't keep up with the grinding. All he had to do was grab pieces from one bowl and put them into the hopper.

  7. #27
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    1,261

    Default

    Years ago we had access to a Hobart three horse grinder that had three speeds. Yes it was heavy, but it would go through the meat. That one went away but now we have a little 1/3 horse grinder from the middle 1950's era. It is not very fast but it will grind some meat. Since we process our meat, time is not something that we worry too much about.
    Would we like to have a better more modern grinder, yes, but for now this one works just fine.

  8. #28
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    664

    Default

    Thanks for the input everybody. The analogy is that I could probably use my 30-06 for everything, but where is the fun in that? Sometimes it has paid to go big. I'm trying to figure if this is one of them.

  9. #29
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    5,071

    Default

    I wanted a 3/4hp LEM but ended up with a 1hp LEM because they were out of the 3/4 at that time and I was partway through a moose. I am super happy with my 1hp. Works great and is fast enough for me. I have a 15 pound stuffer this year to try out - can't wait to catch some meat to push thru it!

  10. #30
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Cabelas 1hp does the trick for me. If I don't cut most of the silver skin out, I'll stop once or twice and pull it out of the auger/blade area just to take care of the machine.

    I ground shanks for a long time. Then I found out they're delicious if you cook them right. This is the only recipe I've used, mainly because it's awesome: https://honest-food.net/braised-veni...recipe-garlic/.

    I got the sawzall out yesterday to cut this year's shanks into crockpot size pieces. One is in the fridge for dinner this week. There's a cool garlic peeling trick in that link, too.

  11. #31
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    664

    Default

    Thanks. That sounds like a great option..

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •