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Thread: Seasport Crazy Ivans

  1. #1

    Default Seasport Crazy Ivans

    Every once in awhile in transition to going on step my 27ft Navigator heels over into a tight turn that I call Crazy Ivans. It's like the chine hooks up and throws you to that side. It's worst while running in the trough. I would like to hear from other Seasport owners as to a solution. Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by otnotdoit View Post
    Every once in awhile in transition to going on step my 27ft Navigator heels over into a tight turn that I call Crazy Ivans. It's like the chine hooks up and throws you to that side. It's worst while running in the trough. I would like to hear from other Seasport owners as to a solution. Thanks in advance.
    I owned two seasports ~ a 22 and a 24xl. They would do weird stuff when running. On occasion, both boats would just start chugging along for no apparent reason, like you just started dragging a whale. I would stop, reset my trim, take off again and bingo, life was good.
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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by tlingitwarrior View Post
    I owned two seasports ~ a 22 and a 24xl. They would do weird stuff when running. On occasion, both boats would just start chugging along for no apparent reason, like you just started dragging a whale. I would stop, reset my trim, take off again and bingo, life was good.
    Mine does the same thing. I will cruising along at 23kt and it's like I start running in sand and my speed drops to 17kts and rpms drop off. I thought I was just running into a weird current.

  4. #4

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    Do they ever 'flop', meaning plane on one side (especially in seas at marginal planing speed, or sometimes in calm seas) over the other? Meaning, it planes on one side of the hull and not both because of conditions. Seen that before with deep V's but knowing about your craft.

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    I ran a 27' seasport with the IB 454, and the same boat after it had been converted to twin 175 Suzuki outboards. I've ran several seasports, and of the handful of different boats I've captained, the inboard seasport was my least favorite and absolutely the biggest handful to drive. In anything buy a head on sea they exhibit strange broaching characteristics; especially in a following quartering sea.

    Once the seasport was converted to outboards, it was a totally new boat. It would pretty much eat up a following sea - probably the result of moving engine weight so much further back on the hull.

    Not sure if you have an IB or OB's, or if this was helpful, but your problems are not unique.

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    Member Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Mine did. I told my mechanic at Noah Marine to look at it. He pulled the trim tab switch and found that whom ever cut the opening, left a nub on the left side. So when you hit the switch the tab sometines went full up or down. Two hits with a file and fixed.

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  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by akfunhog View Post
    I ran a 27' seasport with the IB 454, and the same boat after it had been converted to twin 175 Suzuki outboards. I've ran several seasports, and of the handful of different boats I've captained, the inboard seasport was my least favorite and absolutely the biggest handful to drive. In anything buy a head on sea they exhibit strange broaching characteristics; especially in a following quartering sea.

    Once the seasport was converted to outboards, it was a totally new boat. It would pretty much eat up a following sea - probably the result of moving engine weight so much further back on the hull.

    Not sure if you have an IB or OB's, or if this was helpful, but your problems are not unique.
    I have read somewhere that Seasport installed lead weights behind the fuel tanks. I wonder if they were trying to move the center of gravity back?

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    Mine did. I told my mechanic at Noah Marine to look at it. He pulled the trim tab switch and found that whom ever cut the opening, left a nub on the left side. So when you hit the switch the tab sometines went full up or down. Two hits with a file and fixed.
    I have watched my trim tabs while on the trailer and they work fine. What is the flat spot at the very back of the keel for??

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    I too have a 27' Navigator. Mine is running twin Yamaha 200's. I have not experienced the issue you describe. Rear quartering seas with some size to them can be a royal PITA though. My wife gets all stressed out about how much that throws the boat around.

  10. #10

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    Yes Sea Sport does put "ballast" behind the fuel tanks to make them look good in the water. There should be some access ports through the deck just behind the tanks that you can check for ballast. I have a Pilot House and ended up pulling deck up to carefully chisel out bags of cement that were piled on top of steel bars and lead shot. I removed all of it and then added some back so it wasn't listing.

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    My 22xl does seem to grab a chine and heel hard over. It can be a forceful event. Stay with her!

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  12. #12

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    "Catching a chine" usually is bow steering, especially in following seas with a V hull. Catching a chine is usually what happens in a flat bottom skiff that changes direction too quickly and can happen on a lake in July in Minnesota. Skip, skip and then dig. I nearly killed myself in a flat seine skiff once before I got the hang of it.

  13. #13
    Member Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Silly question but back in the 70's I helped build some 100+ gallon stainless water tanks for a sailboat. In the design we baffled the inside so that the water would not slosh around and or go to one side when the sail boat was listing when turning. I wonder if Seasport baffled their fuel tanks.

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  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    Silly question but back in the 70's I helped build some 100+ gallon stainless water tanks for a sailboat. In the design we baffled the inside so that the water would not slosh around and or go to one side when the sail boat was listing when turning. I wonder if Seasport baffled their fuel tanks.
    I'm not 100% sure, but I think baffles in a boat fuel tank are a build requirement. I'm sure someone here would know for sure.

  15. #15

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    I don't know if it's a requirement to have baffles but anything on a boat that holds liquids should be baffled. I just replaced my fuel tanks and the factory ones
    are baffled.

  16. #16

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    Did you find any ballast behind the fuel tanks? Why did you replace the fuel tanks, leaks, corrosion? What volume did they list the new tanks? I know Sea Sport foamed in the area around the tanks which can soak up water if water gets into the compartments and cause corrosion. Also many Sea Sports list their tank capacity as 80 gallons each tank. Mine are labeled as USCG approved 80 gallons, however, I can only put in 60 gallons. This may be due to the drop tube not extending close to the bottom of the tanks to minimize sucking up water. A 20 gallon discrepancy is a substantial volume of fuel to not have available. The deal is Sea sport advertises 80 gallon tanks and if they do not hold 80 gallons it is very deceptive advertising and can leave you stuck somewhere with no fuel you thought you had.

  17. #17

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    I didn't find any ballast behind the tanks. I had to replace them due to corrosion caused by the foam. The reason the foam gets soaked is that the drain hole is too high from the bottom of the tank compartment and it keeps the tanks wet. I to thought they were 80 gallons so I had them rebuilt to the original size. When I filled them they only took 63 gallons. That's not enough capacity for my boat so I bought a removable 45 gallon plastic tank to fit in the fish hold with quick disconnects.

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