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Thread: .375 H&H Stainless CRF

  1. #1
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    Default .375 H&H Stainless CRF

    OK i am saving up some money and have decided on a stainless 375 H&H, I am thinking on the remingtoin 798 (charles daly mauser 98) if they ever arive in the USA. The only other stainless CRF i know about is the winchester 70 classic stainless as i dont beleive they never manufactured there 375 stainless shadow elite (coated classic more or less). Are there any other stainless CRF rifles out there? This would be a future rifle for coastal brown bears as well as a trip to africa when i retire. And i have been told not to get anything other then CRF for dangerous game. Otherwise browning sako and remington have some nice stainless 375's but none are CRF. What i have actually been told was to go CRF stainless and have the entire barrel and action coated.What do you guys think of this . I can think of no better place to ask this question. Thanks Tanoose

  2. #2

    Default Stainless Stalker

    Browning makes their Stainless Stalker in .375 H&H. I have one and love it. I did not get that BOSS added to the barrel, as it is unnecessary on a hunting rifle and just extra weight for nothing. I have owned these rifles in different calibers for many years, and highly recommend them for Alaska hunting. I have hunted the coastal brownies in some of the worse conditions imaginable in Alaska and my Browning SS rifles, both my (.375 and .338) withstood it better than any gun I have owned or seen. As in all metallic articles, be it blued or stainless, the key is to keep them lubed and wipe them down at the end of the day every day. I carry a small cleaning rag in a small zip lock baggie that is coated in synthetic gun lube for just this reason. It is small and inconsequential even on a sheep or goat hunt, where space and ounces can make or break you.

    A buddy of mine had stainless Sako that did not hold up well. Even though he took care of it, the barrel still got discolored and pitted from the salt spray. My Browning did not, and they were side by side the entire time, and were maintained the same.

    I went to the Brownings years ago after spending a fortune getting some of my blued rifles coated with different treatments, which were mostly just a huge waste of money. The effort it took to keep them from pitting and rusting in the salt water environment was not much less that needed for blued guns.
    Last edited by Hawken54; 07-22-2007 at 07:16. Reason: Fat fingered the keyboard
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  3. #3

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    Whether the new and comparable caliber interests you or not the Ruger Hawkeye Alaskan is stainless, CRF and available in 375 Ruger. It's a heck of a caliber by all accounts, shading the 375 H&H in performance.

  4. #4
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Default

    tanoose,

    I'm going to echo BrownBear's comments on this. Go look at the new Ruger rifles and handle the new 375 Ruger Alaskan.

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    Montana Rifle Company makes an excellent barreled action:
    http://www.montanarifleman.com/

    I had Boondocks in Eagle River order me a couple over the last 18 months. Order a McMillan stock for it ($425) and you are in business. Lead time for the barreled action is about 1-2 months and 6 for the stock.
    The MRC is CRF and styled after the Win 70. What I like about W70 style CRF actions are the triggers. Very simple, mininum of parts, and not likely to freeze up if they get wet in subfreezing temperatures.

    I would like to mention that some of the newer metal coatings are even more resistant to rust than stainless steel is. Although I am a fan of stainless myself because any blemishes can easily be polished out without affecting the overall look of the metal. I can not comment on the Browning as I never owned one. But I am a huge fan of Ruger's rifle and if they made there new Hawkeye in left handed I would own one. This would be the least expensive choice to buy a crf 375.
    Tennessee

  6. #6

    Default Rugers

    Yep, I agree Rugers are nearly bulletproof. What sent me to the Brownings in the first place so long ago was their availability in stainless left hand actions. Being a southpaw, the choices are getting better, but not near enough variety yet. I do own a left hand Ruger M77 .30-06, and except for the wooden stock and blued finish, it is also one of my favorites, (except along the coast and on Kodiak).

    The newer Rugers are definitely worth a look, and I am seriously eyeing that .375 Ruger (just to have one), but I am going to wait until it gets truly established as a viable and available round. The .375 H&H is a time established round that takes a back seat to no one, and is a thumper extraordinaire. Outstanding for anything that walks in Alaska.

    Also, I found the key to reliability up here even in cold wet conditions, is to strip every part of regular lube, and go 100% synthetic, such as graphite lube. Have been doing this since the mid-80's when my Remington 1100 froze up on me one frigid day of ptarmigan hunting near Paxson. Since doing this finicky semiauto, it (and all my guns) has never failed to function down to extreme cold temperatures, in the -30's.

    Don't just spray it and think you are good. You must disassemble every moving part (or have a gunsmith do it), clean every part and reassemble after coating with synthetic lube. If not, you will still have grease under the graphite or whatever you use, and it will still freeze and put you in a pickle.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

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    Have you looked at the Remington 700 XCR. I have one in 375 H&H. It shoots well.

    Ron

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    Default I got a....

    .375 Remington Ultra Mag. this past March.... Here it is!



    I had the barrel chopped down to 21" so it's about the same size as my 16" barreled AR-15. It weighs 6 lbs 12 oz's.



    It packs quite a punch on both ends.... I reload and have put over 150 rounds down range with it!



    From L to R: .300 Wtby, .338 WM, .416 RM, .375 RUM, .375 Wtby, and a .375 Barnes TSX

    - Clint

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    Default

    First thanks for all the replies. I agree that the ruger alaskan is a fine rifle and i hear it will come in stainless next year . But i have my heart set on an 375 H&H so ruger is out of the question i was happy to see the remington xcr and the browning mentioned .On other forums i have been told that i MUST use a CRF and to stay away from the remington and browning rifles. I am in no rush so maybe by the time i am ready winchester will start there run again as i realy did like there model 70 shadow elite. But seeing that you guys who live up in alaska are using push feed rifles opens my eyes to a wider selection of rifles. Thanks again Tanoose

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    Thumbs up C.R.F. only

    A winchester model 70 classic stainless in .375 would be a great alaskan gun. Especially , with a composite lightweight after market stock to replace the factory injection molded one it comes with.

    I have one in .30-06 and would never sell it. they can be hard to come by.

  11. #11

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    Whoever says to avoid the Remington and Brownings are not very well versed in gun reliability. These both have proven themselves time and time again up here, and no one I know in Alaska has had one fail them. It really is more a matter of personal preference than anything else. A controlled feed is nice in Africa, but not necessary. My choice of the Browning is from my personal use and observations, not from hearing others "gun talk". Heck, half the fun of buying a new rifle is trying to decide which one.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  12. #12

    Default Stainless steel catches sun, flashes scare game

    I no longer use any stainless steel rifle for any hunting, sticking with blued for me. I have had the stainless steel barrel catch a flash of the sun and scare off sheep, goats, and moose. That silver flash has ruined several hunts, or made then twice as long. I am sticking with blue and will do the extra cleaning and oiling as needed.

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    Member AKGUPPY's Avatar
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    Default

    OK I give up, what's "stainless CRF ?"

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hawken54 View Post
    Whoever says to avoid the Remington and Brownings are not very well versed in gun reliability. These both have proven themselves time and time again up here, and no one I know in Alaska has had one fail them. It really is more a matter of personal preference than anything else. A controlled feed is nice in Africa, but not necessary. My choice of the Browning is from my personal use and observations, not from hearing others "gun talk". Heck, half the fun of buying a new rifle is trying to decide which one.
    I didnt make a statement about Remington realiability but based upon 10 hunts to Kodiak for blacktail deer I simply grew tired of having the trigger mechanism freeze up due to ice buildup inside the trigger housing. I sold every Remington I owned and went to W70 style rifles or Rugers and have NEVER had the problem reoccur. I never had a failure to feed or eject. It was always the trigger freezing up. And yes, I know how to take care of a rifle. Take apart a Rem 700 and a W70 and tell me what trigger you would want on a rifle being used in snow and icey weather.
    As far as the debate of CRF vs push feed it does not matter to me as long as the rifle works.
    Tennessee

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    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by AKGUPPY View Post
    OK I give up, what's "stainless CRF ?"

    Stainless steel.

    c.r.f. is controlled round feed, or mauser style action with claw extractor.

  16. #16

    Default Snowwolf, apparent misunderstanding

    Snowwolfe, I was responding to Tanoose's reply that on other forums, he was told to avoid Remingtons and Brownings. To be honest, I didn't even read yours.

    I have used my Brownings in Alaska in some of the worse weather Alaska can dish out for over 23 years, and never had an issue. I also used Remingtons and Rugers. The only guns I have seen regularly have problems while hunting caribou in sub-zero weather and while mountain goat hunting has been Sako's. And, these were due to not getting the regular grease out of the action, triggers and bolts. This will make trouble every time, regardless of brand.

    My Brownings have been just phenomenal up here, and as one that actually uses them in the wet cold climate, I personally recommend them. But, others that don't or haven't used them may not. Same with the Remingtons.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

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    Default Those parameters are somewhat limiting...

    I suppose a custom or semi-custom rifle (like the MRC mentioned) would be a good choice. Personally, after having handled a couple of those mausers (when they were known as Charles Daly's) they seem kinda rough. I'd rather get a Mod. 700 XCR in .375 than that 798.

    If it were me, I would go for the Ruger Alaskan in .375 Ruger. I just saw one for $790. If you didn't need to use it for Africa, I'd seriously consider this; http://www.kimberamerica.com/rifles/...ag/montana.php, I know, it's not available in .375 but for Alaska, it would rock!

    Honestly, if you're only going to go after plains game, .338 would be the cat's meow for Zebra, Eland, Wildebeest and things of that nature. Otherwise, wait till just before retirement and save up again...for a Ruger Magnum Rifle in .458 Lott!

    If you didn't HAVE to have stainless (not sure if it would matter much if it's going to be coated anyway), you could always go with a CZ 550 safari rifle in .375, which is CRF. Something else to think about I guess.

    I was fortunate in buying a Winchester Mod. 70 Stainless synthetic in .375 H&H just a week before "the announcement". Got it for $750 too! At the time I had a walnut/blued Mod. 70 .338 w/B.O.S.S. and a Mod. 70 Safari Express in .416 Rem. Mag. (also walnut/blue). I decided to sell those and have the new .375 cover both bases, so I know where you're coming from.

    BTW, don't forget to check the auction sites (gunbroker.com, auction arms, gunsamerica) for used...or possibly unfired...Mod. 70 S/S .375's. You never know, you might be able to get one for little more than a grand.

    Good luck with the search!

    Dave

  18. #18

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    "I didnt make a statement about Remington realiability but based upon 10 hunts to Kodiak for blacktail deer I simply grew tired of having the trigger mechanism freeze up due to ice buildup inside the trigger housing."

    Hmmm. In 35 years of hunting blacktails on Kodiak with a variety of 700's I've never had anything close to a problem, much less a trigger freeze. And some of that hunting was well below zero.

    I'd sure suspect it was your choice of lubes rather than the triggers. Hope you got a good price for your 700's, but I would have suspected the lube.

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    Question

    I would agree with brwnbear that the problem was probably too thick of a petroleum based lube that froze, instead of a light coat of synthetic lube or dry graphite.

    The R700 is a longtime combat proven trigger used in extreme weather environments around the world by many countries militaries.

    Which brand of lube and how much were you using?

  20. #20
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    Here is one for sale on this forum:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=16205

    Exactly what you are looking for.

    Tim

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