Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Rafting and Down???

  1. #1
    Member Roger45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    1,020

    Question Rafting and Down???

    Figured if anyone knows wet and down, it would be rafters and I have a question. I've always taken a synthetic sleeping bag that will retain heat even if wet and dries quickly. Over the last couple of years I keep hearing that Down now has water protection and works more like the synthetic in keeping you warm even if the shell is wet. Looking for actual hands on experiences, good/bad/ugly. Product "Brand" is less important than performance, but would like to know which work or don't work. Thanks.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  2. #2
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    10,449

    Default

    I know moderator Brian M has talked about that treated down a few times now, but don't recall if he actually has some though. You might send him a pm, or maybe he'll just chime in....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  3. #3
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,333

    Default

    Been using treated down for years. All my backpack hunts are now done with down sleeping bags and jackets. The hydrophobic down is very hard to get soaked and never had any of my gear get too wet to use.

    Just back from Kodiak, rained/snowed/hailed everyday.





    Ram from last fall.

    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"

  4. #4
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,551

    Default

    Treated/hydrophobic down is all I carry for insulation anymore, but I don't do much rafting, so I can't answer in that context directly. I have had a few experiences that have made me a believer, though. One night in particular up in the DCUA I was way more wet and cold than I was comfortable with, and the treated down performed spectacularly. Over the course of the evening I was in moderate rain that turned to snow, and I had to move my camp four miles, getting everything fairly wet in the process. When I finally got camp set up, I crawled into my damp down sleeping bag with my more damp down jacket and pants on. I was honestly concerned about whether I would warm up that night, as that was the first real test of the gear for me. I not only woke up warm, but I woke up dry. Both my clothing and my bag dried overnight. I've been a believer ever since. I've never completely waterlogged the stuff, but used underneath a good shell/rainjacket, it is what I'll continue to carry.

  5. #5
    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    I take down bags for my family of 4 on float trips. They are stuffed into a drybag when on the raft and Iím confident that I could flip the boat and everything in dry bags and dry boxes would remain dry. The only chance of my sleeping bags getting wet is a catastrophic tent failure.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Treated/hydrophobic down is all I carry for insulation anymore, but I don't do much rafting, so I can't answer in that context directly. I have had a few experiences that have made me a believer, though.
    Here is a long discussion with Gary Peterson (product designer from Western Mountaineering) about hydrophobic down and his thoughts on it. It should be noted that this was in 2013 and WM still doesn't use hydrophobic down.
    https://backpackinglight.com/forums/topic/83532/

    As for down vs synthetic. I pack my down bags in a Sea to Summit Event dry bag and have never had an issue with dampness even on chronically wet trips.

  7. #7
    Member Roger45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    1,020

    Default

    Fantastic replies so far :-) Thanks so much!
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  8. #8
    Member Roger45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    1,020

    Default

    Has anyone tried the PRIMALOFTģ GOLD INSULATION DOWN BLEND? Reading up on it and it sounds like the best of both worlds, although slightly heavier than down alone. I'm trying to see if this is available in a sleeping bag, but so far I'm only finding jackets.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  9. #9
    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    You canít go wrong with WesternMountaineering products. I own 5 of their down sleeping bags. Donít sleep in the rain and donít let your bag fall in the river if not in a drybag and you wonít regret buying a down product. Just my $.02.

  10. #10
    Member Roger45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    1,020

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Birdstrike View Post
    You canít go wrong with WesternMountaineering products. I own 5 of their down sleeping bags. Donít sleep in the rain and donít let your bag fall in the river if not in a drybag and you wonít regret buying a down product. Just my $.02.
    I went to Western Mountaineering's home page and started to read up on their stuff. Interesting that they are absolutely opposed to hydrophobic coating and prefer to use water resistant shells. They have a good explanation too. My experience in my youth (the dark ages centuries ago LOL) was that when wearing a down coat I would sweat and then it was remove the coat or freeze.

    Are you using the mummy style bag or wider ones? Any specific model you like better/worse than others? Thanks for you $0.02 worth :-)
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  11. #11
    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger45 View Post
    I went to Western Mountaineering's home page and started to read up on their stuff. Interesting that they are absolutely opposed to hydrophobic coating and prefer to use water resistant shells. They have a good explanation too. My experience in my youth (the dark ages centuries ago LOL) was that when wearing a down coat I would sweat and then it was remove the coat or freeze.

    Are you using the mummy style bag or wider ones? Any specific model you like better/worse than others? Thanks for you $0.02 worth :-)
    I have 3 XL MegaLite mummy bags for my sons and I and a shorter MityLite semi-rectangular bag for my wife (she doesnít like mummies). The MegaLites are rated to 30F and the MityLite to 40F. They have been warm enough for summer trips. I also have a Badger GWS for cooler weather trips. Along with those, I also have a couple of Wiggys combo bags that can be used from summer to winter depending on whether they are used separate or together. The Wiggys bags obviously donít pack nearly as small. Iíve tried other synthetic bags and donít miss them.

    if Iím in camp and the weather is nice I try to remeber to air out the bags. Sweat and breathing moisture eventually add up for any type of insulation.

  12. #12
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    10,449

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger45 View Post
    I went to Western Mountaineering's home page and started to read up on their stuff. Interesting that they are absolutely opposed to hydrophobic coating and prefer to use water resistant shells. They have a good explanation too. My experience in my youth (the dark ages centuries ago LOL) was that when wearing a down coat I would sweat and then it was remove the coat or freeze.
    I believe the key is to realize you're starting to sweat before you do too much. When I was young I didn't think about it too much but I make it a point to these days.

    I also believe that the outer shell on down bags make a huge difference as well. I remember goin to sleep in a cheap down/feather bag under the stars once, and woke up covered in about 2 inches of snow on top of me. I slept sound that night and hadn't a clue it had started snowing. But I was as warm and snug as a bug because I had an old mummy canvas type military cover over me. The snow stayed like powder on top of me and didn't even think about melting at all....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  13. #13
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post

    If you don't mind me asking, which raft is this?

  14. #14
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,333

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rainbro trout View Post
    If you don't mind me asking, which raft is this?
    Alpacka Fjord Explorer,, older packraft.
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •