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Thread: Kenai dipping report for friday

  1. #1

    Default Kenai dipping report for friday

    at 6am it was hot for about an hour, got 10, -went dead for the rest of the day but we picked up 5 more in between tides. Then it went completely on FIRE during the pm tide starting to come in, got 15 more and stopped because the 3 of us didnt need any more fish... so we left with 30, with probably a good 22-25 of them being huge fish over 7-8 pounds with some pushing 10


    WE WERE BOAT DIPPING AND IT WAS EXTREMELY CROWDED

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Congratulations! Glad to hear that your family got into the fish.

  3. #3
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    Default Friday run was excellent

    We dipped from the beach on the south side on Friday, and I'll echo most of what Fishwhacker said about it going off like crazy in the afternoon and the fish being mostly plus-sized. Here's the beach report if you're considering going and haven't dipped from the south side before:
    • Throw out everything you've heard about which tide to fish. When there are decent numbers of fish, like yesterday, the tide doesn't matter. From about an hour before low tide most people were slamming fish at the drop off where the water gets a little deeper (4 - 5 feet). From dead low tide around 3 p.m. until 7 p.m., when we left, it was non-stop.
    • When the tide was still going out, the people walking with their nets were nailing fish when the ones just standing in one place kept losing them to "back side" hits on the net. Good luck with that. If you want a lot of exercise, it's very aerobic.
    • The winds and chop turned the water to mud as the tide came over the soft stuff on the rising high tide. We could stand in knee-deep water and still get a fish every 3 or 4 minutes, though, and I suppose the wind was really driving the fish in close to shore. During the morning incoming tide, when the winds were much lighter, we had to wade all the way out to the drop off to get fish (about 100 yards). In the afternoon, we had to walk maybe 10 feet.
    • If there are strong winds out of the west-southwest, take some clean water to rinse your fish.
    • We used binoculars and watched the people on the north side dipping and when the south side was going crazy it looked calm and un-fishy across the river. I don't know if the winds had anything to do with that.
    • If the number of cars and trucks I saw heading south Friday evening was any indication, everyone from Anchorage and the Valley will be in Kenai this weekend.
    • Someone down there said they picked up decent numbers of fish up at the bridge. Except for the mud, dipping at the bridge is about as relaxed as it gets, because they can only fit so many vehicles in the parking.
    • Take sunscreen. I forgot mine yesterday and I'm paying for it today.
    • Do what the smart people down there do and take a plastic toboggan (sp.?) to haul your cooler and gear down near the water. By the end of the day you'll be glad you did.
    • Some of the stronger people attach stringers to their waists so they don't have to keep leaving the water to dump each fish in a cooler or tote. Except when the current's running strong or a fish really twists the net, it's a great idea. Some guys wouldn't head to the beach to dump fish until they had four or five on a stringer.
    End of report. Go get 'em!

  4. #4
    Member AKStafford's Avatar
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    Default We were there too...

    There was six of us that went down yesterday, two adults, four kids (age 12 to 16). We left the Valley at 8am, was in the water before 1pm. Fishing was pretty decent. It was still the out going tide. I've always heard "fish the incoming" but most of my successful days have been on outgoing tides. When the tide turn it died for a while, then got hot for a very short window. Then the wave action picked up and it was very slow, plus you were fighting the waves.
    We called it quits at 7pm, with almost 50 fish between us.
    The people with the longer poles seemed to be getting more.
    The fish definitely seem much larger that I am used to...
    The people that had been there since the early morning had some big piles of fish.
    We were on the north side of the Kenai, and it was very crowded when we first got there.
    Coming home, every other vehicle had dipnets strapped to it. I can't image how crowded it is today!
    I think I'll go back Tuesday, after the crowds are gone.

  5. #5
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    Default Watch your fish I.D. at Kenai

    I forgot to mention that there are quite a few chum salmon mixed in with the reds for some reason. I guess the runs overlap or something. Just wanted to mention that you might want to watch for those chums because it's easy to get excited when you've got a 10+ pound fish in your net and you don't even notice that there's something not quite right about it. Nothing like inviting friends for dinner, or offering a couple fillets to someone as a gift, only to find that everyone thinks it's the funkiest tasting red ever.

    We've made jerky out of chums a couple times, and if you use a bunch of soy sauce, coarse pepper, and some sugar they actually taste real good. I smoked one last year and it was as good as a silver, but not as tasty as a red.

    So, if you keep the fillets separate, chums aren't necessarily a bad thing, but don't count them toward your limit when you're dipping!

    Side note: I don't know if anyone's ever cooked a starry flounder, but I've been told they taste lousy, have soft flesh, and generally are a nuisance. Tons of flounder in the water off the beaches yesterday, 2 and 3 at a time in the net for about a half hour near low tide. At least they don't stick in the net and you can dump 'em easily.

  6. #6
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    Default Stringer Mentioned

    check the stringer idea @ www.kenaikeeper.com

    1. You don't have to be "strong" to hold them in the water, they are really bouyant and don't drag you even in the incoming/outgoing currents

    2. You can actually stack about 10-15 comfortably on one stringer before getting out and batch processing

    3. Thanks for the good idea comment; it's a pleasure to hear positive feedback!
    "He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit is better than he who takes a city." ~ Proverbs 16:32

  7. #7
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bibico View Post
    So, if you keep the fillets separate, chums aren't necessarily a bad thing, but don't count them toward your limit when you're dipping!
    Are you sure about that? I haven't picked up my permit yet for this year, but I seem to remember that you are allowed 25 salmon for the head of household plus 10 for each additional member, not 25 sockeye salmon. I'm pretty sure that the chums would count towards your overall limit, as do pinks, silvers, and kings. Am I wrong here?

  8. #8

    Default Brian's right

    The total yearly harvest limit is 25 salmon and 10 flounder for the permit holder and 10 salmon for each additional household member. The limit is combined for all four fisheries, not for each fishery. Only one (1) king salmon may be retained from the Kenai River dip net fishery. NO RETENTION of king salmon is allowed in the Kasilof River or Fish Creek dip net fi sheries.

    http://www.sf.adfg.state.ak.us/state...ral/07SCpu.pdf

  9. #9

    Default

    there was no chums... only reds, we would have noticed, by the way starry flounder are almost exactly the same taste as halibut and are very good if cooked fresh, dont freeze them. The mushy flounder is arrowtooth not starry. BTW- There is seperate limits for different fish... its all on the tag

  10. #10

    Default Not Being Critical here

    If you read the Dipnet card carefully it states 25 salmon for the head of household, and 10 salmon for each additional household member. There isn't an additional limit for the different species. They want you to record how many of each species you caught, but the limit still remains 25, and 10 for each additional house member. It doesn't matter what species, except for kings. You can only keep 1 king. I would be very hesitant to throw any salmon back. Unless it was a king and you already had a king.

    I hate so see someone go dipping with incorrect info. Bottom line is to read the regs carefully before you embark on your fishing ventures.

  11. #11
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    Default Thanks for the correction about chums.

    I apologize for saying chums aren't counted toward your limit. The other posters are absolutely correct that they are.

    Sorry for that misinformation, everyone.

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