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Thread: help!!!!----how to practice?---long ?

  1. #1
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    Angry help!!!!----how to practice?---long ?

    a buddy and i are getting ready for a brown bear hunt spring of 2008---he shoots a 375 h&h---i shoot a 416 rem----we started shooting in march,and both of us improved quickly during for about the first 2 months---here is the problem---neither of us is getting any better---'---i would really appreciate some ideas on how to practice---we only shoot 8-10 rounds of the big bores(giving the barrels lots of time to cool) and shoot 22 or 223 the rest of the time---thanks in advance for any help

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    If you can put all your shots into the size of a paper plate at 100 yards, then you are ready!

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    Shooting the .416 will be very easy. Purchase lots of cheap bullets, even cast bullets. For jacketed, load the shell 75% full with H-1000, or any other slow powder. This will dramatically reduce velocities. From a baseline you can begin loading powders with faster burn rates, until you reach IMR-7828 or RL-22 you should keep the velocities under 2100 fps.

    If you use cast bullets, your powder of choice will be XMP-5744 around 30 grains.

    Reduce the recoil and you'll not flinch. Fire about 10-15 rounds of low velocity then if you feel up to it, fire 2-3 full-on loads.

    When you are shooting your 10-15 and 2-3, stand at the firing line and have your buddy (behind you), load your rifle. Always have on hand dummy rounds that he can drop in there; you never know if it is for-real or a CLICK.
    This will help reduce flinch. Do the same for him.

    PM me with your email addy, and I'll send you my velocity/powder chart I created after building it with my .500 A-Square.

    This will also work with the .375 H&H to a limited extent due to the cartridge shape.

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    I suggest you check for flinching especially due to the calibers you are using. Load the guns for each other, not knowing if there is a round in the chamber or not. If there is not a round, and you flinch, you and he will definitley know it. Most shooters either do not know they are flinching or won't admit it. You will not improve unless you learn to control the flinching. When you conquer the flinch, your eye will not even blink at the shot.

    The saying about you don't feel the recoil in the field is a bit of a croc. Flinching is a learned involuntary response to an "expected" stimulus, it is not a response to an actual stimulus. You don't flinch from the shot, you flinch from the learned "expectation" of the shot. It begins before you pull the trigger not after. Your psychii does not turn this response off because you are concentrating on other things, it has now become part of your reflex. It still involuntarily occurs but you may be so tuned into other events that you just don't record it happening. Through training you can overcome this response just as you can overcome blinking before you insert contacts.

    You should also be able to "call" your shots from the offhand position. No one is rock steady offhand and it is a matter of timing your shot as the crosshair crosses the bullseye. You cannot always be perfect at squeezing at the right moment but you should be able to say exactly where the bullet went even before looking at the hole, again assuming your eyes were not closed! You might say something like "4 inches at 2 o'clock".

  5. #5

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    You don't say it, but are you shooting mostly from the bench? If so, stand up and practice offhand. It's going to make the recoil lots more tollerable plus it will be better practice for the field.

    If you're already shooting offhand, then by all means start handloading some lighter loads. I probably put 700-1000 rounds a year through my 375, but only about 1/3 of those are full snort. The light loads help you learn the mechanics of shooting that particular gun, following which the heavy loads teach you how to tame the recoil.

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    Default help replies

    thanks for the responses and advice---some comments---we have been shooting from sitting ,kneeling,and off-hand----my buddy is a better shot than me ,so these comments include both of us,with his results being somewhat better than mine---i can hit 5 inch targets at 25 and 50 yds from the positions mentioned---can hit 8 inch at 75 and 100 yards---can hit 18 inch at 200 yards sitting---approx 50 % kneeling---maybe 10 % off-hand---that said--the results have not improved in the last 2 months---will try out your suggestions and report back after---thanks again!!!

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    In my opinion, the best way to improve your shooting ability is to use a 22 rf offhand at small targets at 50 and 100 yds. You'll see a dramatic improvement in your shooting ability. When you can hit offhand, any sort of rest will be easier to shoot from.

    I'd also say dryfire your 416 50-100 times a day. You don't have to shoot massive amounts of full patch loads through a big bore to improve your shooting. If anything, limit your big bore sessions, but put in lots of dryfiring.

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    Have to agree with Paul, shoot your .22's off hand as much as possible. Next step is to load up some light kickers and shoot them off hand as well.
    Nothing is as hard to do as off hand. When you then go to sitting, rest, prone ,etc you will be amazed how much better you have become.
    Another hint is to have your friend load your rifle for you occassionly not putting one in the chamber to test your flinching abilities.
    Tennessee

  9. #9

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    Hey ezmarch, you and your buddy are practicing for hunting right, so how often do you fire 8-10 shots at one time when hunting?? Not so much. So try taking one shot, then sitting back and talking for a while then 30 min later take one more. During this time donít look at your target, wait until you have shot 5 or so and look at your group. Try and change the distance as well. Shoot at 50 100 150 if you can keep them all in a pie plate you are set and ready to kill. I have used this with bows as well. Any one can get the bull after a few shots, but the first one is the tricky one, and the most important when hunting. This will work on you first shot with a cold gun. Let me know how it works out for yall.

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    Default thanks for the suggestions

    again thanks for the practice suggestions---the 8-10 shots with the big bores are over a 1.5 to 2 hour session at the range---the rest of the time is shooting the 22 and 223(and of course large doses of BS)---after implementing these ideas will report back in a few weeks with a (positive thinking only) glowing report

  11. #11

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    Well let us know how it goes. Just remember practice how you play. If you are going to be shooting off hand for the bear, practice that way. Take your time, and the 22 is a grate way to practice up on the basics. The big bore rifles are a little harder for some to get use to, I my self love them. The bigger the better, I am not huge guy, 6 ft 185lbs but I keep it tight on my shoulder and have no problem. Good shooting.

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