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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Step One: Check to see if you can pass at least the 2nd class FAA flight physical. You can look-up all the requirements for free, then ask your doc. If you can't pass a 2nd class, then forget the whole thing.

    FAA Physical scheduled for Wednesday. Should I go ahead with 2nd class now? I was thinking 3rd class was all I needed.?

    Step Two: Take one intro instructional flight with an older ( gray or white hair) CFI and make sure you like it and make sure she or he thinks you have any aptitude for this business. If you stink at it, take up sailing. I said instructional, not a flight seeing trip with your kids, and not another hour for a young CFI who really wants to be a space shuttle pilot.

    I have taken a "Discovery Flight" years ago. Basically a 30 minute flight where the CFI let me take controls and showed me the basic ropes, etc. of maneuvering the plane. After that I did take a few lessons, but had to stop for unforseen financial reasons.
    (I do also sail a bit, Lol)

    Step Three: Find a used DVD or computer CD written test prep course. King Course. It should be only 18 months old at max. (ebay) Start working on that every night so you can pass the written.

    When I previously took a few lessons, I did a weekend ground school class and passed the FAA written. I think I would pass again with a little refresher and some studying. (it has been about 6 years so the one I passed is no good now).
    Once I get a CFI on-board I will see which books he\she recommends..I am currently reading Rod Machado's PP book..


    Step Four: Start piece-milling together some flight lessons with an old CFI who does not need to build hours.

    There is a local flying club I can join that has 2 planes, a 172 and 182. Once a member you can rent wet cheaper than any school around here. They also have about 5 CFIs that are members. I am not sure which are "gray hairs" at the moment...other than me.
    Hopefully I will have all of this in place and started within the next 2-3 weeks. I even sold my Harley to free up some financial responsibility...if that is not dedication I dont know what is. Lol.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by akaviator View Post
    ...You would put hours in your logbook like you may have never imagined and be at ATP minimums in about 2 years...
    That is good to know, Thanks. I guess once you actually get a job that becomes a possibility..at the moment I just need to get the foundation for an employer to even consider taking a chance on me.

  3. #23
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    A second class is what you will need for a commercial and it reverts to a 3rd. My point was that if you cannot pass the second class, you will never fly commercially.

    How many hours do you have logged?

    I sold an old Sportster and a Low Rider to buy my first legitimate airplane.

    I just sold off a bunch of late 1800s Winchesters to help pay for my last ( 7th) airplane.

    Now I need to sell a kidney on the black market to afford a pair of Aerocet floats.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    A second class is what you will need for a commercial and it reverts to a 3rd. My point was that if you cannot pass the second class, you will never fly commercially.

    I will go for the 2nd class then.

    How many hours do you have logged?

    Only about 2-3 actual flying hours..no solo.

    I sold an old Sportster and a Low Rider to buy my first legitimate airplane.

    I just sold off a bunch of late 1800s Winchesters to help pay for my last ( 7th) airplane.

    Wow, bet those were tough to let go of.!

    Now I need to sell a kidney on the black market to afford a pair of Aerocet floats.
    ...............

  5. #25
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    Funny. I sold my Wide Glide to buy my Aeronca Sedan which I used to get up to the magic 1000 hours that, at that time, was said to be where employers would start talking to you. I have a feeling you might have better luck with less hours now. Making a sacrifice like getting rid of the Harley shows you're getting serious about this. I also sold guns to help finance airplane expenses....I regret that now. Selling a Mauser and a Springfield back in the early 90's didn't cover too much of what I had to pay for an annual.
    Louis Knapp

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    A second class is what you will need for a commercial and it reverts to a 3rd. My point was that if you cannot pass the second class, you will never fly commercially.

    How many hours do you have logged?

    I sold an old Sportster and a Low Rider to buy my first legitimate airplane.

    I just sold off a bunch of late 1800s Winchesters to help pay for my last ( 7th) airplane.

    Now I need to sell a kidney on the black market to afford a pair of Aerocet floats.

    I sold 2 BMW motorcycles to buy my first airplane, a Pacer, and used it to get my 135 minimums. With that I started my first commercial flying job at 40.

  7. #27
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    Just passed my 2nd Class medical exam.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by WannaBfromSC View Post
    Just passed my 2nd Class medical exam.
    Sounds like you're good to go. On your next one, you might consider seeing if you can get a 1st, just to see if you can. There are a couple things in 135 that do require it, though it sounds like you're unlikely to encounter them. It's good just to know. The only real difference is the EKG. And when the 1st expires, it reverts to 2nd, then 3rd.

    As far as getting to ATP mins, you most certainly will if you fly for a living. When I was flying small planes I was always up against the 1000 and 1200 hour limits per year. You'll get to 1500 pretty fast at that rate. Even now I usually fly 6-700 a year.

    Quote Originally Posted by WannaBfromSC View Post
    I did see that on their website. I will certainly never make it to ATP at my current age and economic level. More interested in small aircraft..doesn't have to include flying people around on scheduled flights. Flying for a guide / lodge, or supplies, etc. would be of interest..assuming I could afford to eat doing that. Lol.
    The website might not be around, but they still operate on two separate certificates. The 121 side has just the dash, the 135 side is everything else. If you call them up for a job as a warm body with a wet commercial, you'll be in the right seat of something on the 135 side. You need an ATP to do anything at all under 121. When talking to other pilots, most people refer to the 121 flying as Ravn and the 135 flying as Hageland.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by z987k View Post
    Sounds like you're good to go. On your next one, you might consider seeing if you can get a 1st, just to see if you can. There are a couple things in 135 that do require it, though it sounds like you're unlikely to encounter them. It's good just to know. The only real difference is the EKG. And when the 1st expires, it reverts to 2nd, then 3rd.

    As far as getting to ATP mins, you most certainly will if you fly for a living. When I was flying small planes I was always up against the 1000 and 1200 hour limits per year. You'll get to 1500 pretty fast at that rate. Even now I usually fly 6-700 a year.


    The website might not be around, but they still operate on two separate certificates. The 121 side has just the dash, the 135 side is everything else. If you call them up for a job as a warm body with a wet commercial, you'll be in the right seat of something on the 135 side. You need an ATP to do anything at all under 121. When talking to other pilots, most people refer to the 121 flying as Ravn and the 135 flying as Hageland.
    Yes they do....I worked for Hageland, Frontier, and Era so I'm fairly familiar with the operation.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by akaviator View Post
    Yes they do....I worked for Hageland, Frontier, and Era so I'm fairly familiar with the operation.
    I assume most flying jobs are paid per "flight hour". What would you say is the normal "hour to flight hour ratio" at most operations that you have worked with. What is the number you'd expect to fly per week, and how many hours on-duty would it take you to get that number? Basically what I am asking is- In order to get "x" number of flight hours you will be on-site "y" hours..Just curious what the average is in that type of business..I assume it is a lot like long-haul truckers where they get paid by the mile and any time not driving is basically "free" to the company. What do you do during that time you are not being paid? Sit in a lounge and drink coffee, or are you expected to work around the base of operations providing free labor?

  11. #31
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    Canít speak for all but those Iím familiar with pay an hourly rate for flight time and another for standby. Iíd opine that the pay has to be fair, given the shortage of pilots. From what I hear the air ambulance and regionals are siphoning off the ATP guys as quick as they get a ticket.

  12. #32
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    I wouldn't say there is a normal flight to non flying hour ratio, it depends a lot on who you're working for, where you're stationed and your seniority. You can usually plan on a 14 hour duty day and anywhere from 0-8 hours of flying per day. Most places have a base pay of so many guaranteed hours per day so you will at least make a few bucks even on a weather day. When not flying most are hanging out in the pilot lounge drinking coffee and surfing the web. Some outfits will ask pilots to help out around the base when there's no flying to be done and frankly I prefer it. Theres only so much time to be spent on the internet so it's usually quite nice to do something active.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskaOE View Post
    .. frankly I prefer it. Theres only so much time to be spent on the internet so it's usually quite nice to do something active.
    I know what you mean there..much rather be busy to help the day go by..was just wondering if there was actual pay when not flying. I knew a mechanic that worked at a local dealership and he only got paid for actual work, and each task had a given "time" associated with it. So, if he was at work for 10 hours, but only had one task that was considered a "2 hour job", then he got paid his hourly rate for 2 hours that day. If he was fast and had a steady stream of jobs he could theoretically get paid for more hours than he worked..that never happened.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by WannaBfromSC View Post
    I assume most flying jobs are paid per "flight hour". What would you say is the normal "hour to flight hour ratio" at most operations that you have worked with. What is the number you'd expect to fly per week, and how many hours on-duty would it take you to get that number? Basically what I am asking is- In order to get "x" number of flight hours you will be on-site "y" hours..Just curious what the average is in that type of business..I assume it is a lot like long-haul truckers where they get paid by the mile and any time not driving is basically "free" to the company. What do you do during that time you are not being paid? Sit in a lounge and drink coffee, or are you expected to work around the base of operations providing free labor?
    If you're flying part 135 you're going to be living in Bethel, Aniak, St. Marys, Nome, or Barrow...I don't think I missed a base. 15 days on 15 off.

    You're paid to fly airplanes and the duties of making sure it's put away at night properly and put into service each morning properly. I averaged 4-5 hours a day flying the 207, more in a Caravan. Certain times of year you fly more, others less. It's Alaska. There's weather.

    Here's the current pay scale, it was pretty easy to find with a simple search.

    https://www.flyravn.com/for-pilots/pay-benefits/

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    Good information, thank you, Sir.

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