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Thread: Marlin 336 stock question

  1. #1

    Default Marlin 336 stock question

    We have all had guns that we let get away but I have had a couple that walked away without my blessing. One was a 1951 Marlin 336 in 35 Remington. It belonged to an old man in Missouri named Evret King. I hunted deer on his property for years. The last trip down there to hunt saw Evret at 92 years old and in bad health. Sitting in his chair a shadow of himself. Breathing with the aid of a tank at his side. Clear back off the beaten path on a dirt road with noone to look after him. He told me that he wanted me to have his rifle as he wouldn't be around much longer. So I gladly accepted the old Marlin. I remember ole Evret loved Dinty Moore Beef Stew so I drove the 20 miles into Unionville and bought both cases of stew that the store had on hand. I might add that Dinty Moore beef Stew was a lot better back then than it is now.

    Long story short, I loaned that rifle to my best friend who was going to Missouri deer hunting the next fall. He loaned it to his dipstick brother who ran off to Florida with Evret's gun. It has been a several year quest to track that gun down but it is finally coming home to me and I had to buy my own gun and pay shipping to get it back where it belongs. So far all I have seen are pictures and one tell tale mark on the forearm authenticates it as Evret's rifle. The gun looks to be in great shape other than the original pistol grip stock was apparently broken and replaced with a butcher job stock.

    I went to order a stock for the gun in anticipation of its arrival but ran into conflict. I have been told that the early 336 rifles like this 1951 model require a model 36 stock as they have a longer tang. I have also been told that a 336 pistol grip stock is universal to any other 336 stock. Then someone on the Marlin forum said they changed the length of the tang several times. Everything I read conflicts on the matter. So I came back to this forum where people tell you what they know to be fact rather than just repeating what they have read.

    Can you fellas help me out? Will an aftermarket 336 stock work...do I need a model 36 stock?????? I'm lost!

  2. #2

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    Can't begin to say, but I'll pass along a bit of experience with stocking. Given a choice of one to adapt, go for the stock with the shorter tang. It's a pretty small job to inlet for a longer tang.

    One bit of advice on tang inletting though, even for the comparatively mild 35 Rem. Don't go for a "perfect" fit at the very back of the tang. You want the slightest gap between metal and wood to avoid hammering and eventual stock splits. Doesn't have to be a big ugly gap, but extra space about the thickness of a business card or matchbook cover will save later stock headaches.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Can't begin to say, but I'll pass along a bit of experience with stocking. Given a choice of one to adapt, go for the stock with the shorter tang. It's a pretty small job to inlet for a longer tang.

    One bit of advice on tang inletting though, even for the comparatively mild 35 Rem. Don't go for a "perfect" fit at the very back of the tang. You want the slightest gap between metal and wood to avoid hammering and eventual stock splits. Doesn't have to be a big ugly gap, but extra space about the thickness of a business card or matchbook cover will save later stock headaches.
    What is your opinion concerning glassing the stock at all points that will potentially take the recoil?

  4. #4

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    I do it on some stocks, but never tried it on the Marlin. I'd have to look at one and do some studying, but with a very good fit to the back of the receiver it's probably not necessary. Lotta, lotta Marlins out there that have never split.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  5. #5
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    That is a simple lesson to NEVER loan a gun to ANYONE.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  6. #6
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    What did “your best friend” have to say to you about loaning “your rifle” to his bro?

  7. #7

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    That is a simple lesson to NEVER loan a gun to ANYONE.
    Hard lesson learned for sure.

  9. #9

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    That happened back around 1990. He went broke farming...lost the family farm and left his wife and 3 kids. I think he is married to bar fly number 3 since. Somewhere amongst it all he brain farted and half of it went out his ears. We had our day of reckoning and it got ugly but that had more to do with him laying hands on his ex wife(my wife's best friend since childhood). His parents were great people.....it's just one of those things that nobody saw coming. I refuse to carry a grudge, I prefer to deal with that stuff in a " one and done" fashion.....and I did that. I have moved and my old man life is great, his not so much!😉

  10. #10

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    I double posted for some reason?

  11. #11
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I do it on some stocks, but never tried it on the Marlin. I'd have to look at one and do some studying, but with a very good fit to the back of the receiver it's probably not necessary. Lotta, lotta Marlins out there that have never split.
    I like to carefully glass the most forward edges of the wrist where it contacts the back of the receiver, and I also glass the tang mortises, except for the very back curve where I leave a bit of a gap. Seems like ol' man Savage expressly designed the 1899 lever gun series to split butt stocks.

  12. #12

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    Sounds like you handled the situation with dignity and class. There is a guy on Marlinowners that uses the screen name Tomray. He worked in the engineering dept. at the Ct. Marlin plant for years and is an expert on all things Marlin. I would pm him and I sure you will get the correct answer.

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