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Thread: Goat caliber--.270 or .338??

  1. #1
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    Default Goat caliber--.270 or .338??

    I have a couple of options for a goat hunt on Kodiak. .270, .338 both are stainless with composite stocks-----the real question, is the .270 enough for goats??? I am origionally from the mid-west and it was my favorite caliber for long shots or any for that matter. Just looking for some opinions that have "been there---done that"

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    Member wildwilderness's Avatar
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    Of course the .270 is enough, But thats coming from a bow hunter. Check out this goat my buddy shot with his bow. I also put up a Black Bear I shot with my "little" .270. double lung shot didn't go more than 20 yards. The bear squared 6'4' with a green skull of 20". I generally bow hunt now, but the only rifle I own is a .270 WIN, even killled a couple elk with it in the past.
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    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    Shot placement is the key to taking down any animal.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    .270 is a great gun, but for my clients i prefer the bigger .30's. shot a goat last year with the .270, four shots into the engine and it never lost its footing, obviously if we'd have hit some bone it woulda been different, but i'd rather see the .338 with a client on a goat hunt, like the extra oommph.
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    Default goat

    Quote Originally Posted by wildwilderness View Post
    Of course the .270 is enough, But thats coming from a bow hunter. Check out this goat my buddy shot with his bow. I also put up a Black Bear I shot with my "little" .270. double lung shot didn't go more than 20 yards. The bear squared 6'4' with a green skull of 20". I generally bow hunt now, but the only rifle I own is a .270 WIN, even killled a couple elk with it in the past.
    That's a good lookin' goat pic. What was the horn length?
    Everything that lives and moves will be food for you.
    Genesis 9:3

  6. #6

    Default Long range shots for goats ....

    I have shot goats with a 30-06 using a 150 grain bullet at 200 to 300 yards A .270 is similar and will be sufficient for that long range shot with a good placed shot in the vitals or shoulder. A goat is not a real large animal, so I do not recommend the .338 for goat which is a shorter range caliber with more knock down power. It's distance and the ability to reach out there that is more important with goats. I now reload my 300 Win Mag with loads for 110 grain, 150 grain, and 165 grain for long shots on the not-so-large game.

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    Default .270 or .338?

    No question for me....goats don't require heavy artillery, however, other Kodiak locals do. Were you to have an unsought visit from the top of the food chain on Kodiak, you might find the .270 was a poor choice. Once you get your goat, you will be broadcasting a large meat-blood-easymeal scent signal and should be prepared for what may come. But that's just my take. Happy huntin'.

  8. #8

    Default .338

    Having hunted goats in the Valdez area and dealing with brown bears while doing it, I highly recommend you choose the .338. It will anchor a goat but more imortantly, will be MUCH better if you need to stop a brownie. I know this first hand, and if you ever have to face a real charge, even the .338 will feel small. I faced mine with my .375 H&H and wished I was carrying bigger when it happened.

    A billy can be tough, as they will step off a cliff on you if not anchored in their tracks, and the .338 is vastly superior to this.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  9. #9
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    I like the looks of the bear particularly! Thats nice.

    Isn't funny how many guys like to lay down for their goat photos. Your legs are done by the time you get one of those babies down.

    Its almost time for another round of fresh photos. Good luck everyone.

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    I vote for a .338 with a 200, 210 or 225 gr. premium bullet. i like .30 cal and bigger for all ak. game. m.h.o.

  11. #11

    Smile More Horsepower

    Use the .338!

    Bigmnt

  12. #12
    Member wildwilderness's Avatar
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    I don't remember the length on the horns of the goat my buddy shot with his bow, he did say it scored 47", it had length but not as much mass.

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    Member trapperbob's Avatar
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    Default .338 for sure

    Kodiak has the best terrain for not losing goats over an edge, but you will find the big billies over there are huge bodied animals and put together very stoutly. The .270 will not go all the way through both shoulders of a large billy much past 200 yards. I have lost 2 of 7 goats and the two that were lost were mortally hit with a .308, and 30-06. I shoot a .338 for goats they're front half is very bony and formidable, and you first have to pass through thick hide and fur. The goat I lost with the .308 I believe would have been recovered with a .338. At 200 yds. using 165 gr.trophy bonded bear claws it only broke the near shoulder. The goat traveled several hundred yards on three legs to a cliff. The .338 is every bit the long range gun a .270 is with lighter bullets.

  14. #14

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    Shot my billy at 40 yards with a 338, 225gr partitions. He just stood there for about 10 seconds dropped to his knees then rolled over after about 30 seconds blowing blood out his nose. About 60% of the bullet was found on the far shoulder. It wasn't a complete pass through but he did suck up all the energy. Tough suckers, and I'm sure the 11 browns we saw on that hunt were probably a bit tougher. Take the 338 or get a 300, no sense in losing your goat because you didn't bring enough gun.


  15. #15

    Default .338

    I shot a goat with my 300 win mag that was laying down. shot him through the lungs and it angled out and shatered his shoulder on the opposite side. My buddy shot right after me at another goat laying down in front of him and behind him and his bulllet exited his goat and hit my goat in the hind quarters. The goat stood up on one good leg and ran for the cliffs about 30 yards in front of him. Fell right at the edge of the cliff. They are tough. I got a .338 about 4 years ago and use it almost exclusively now. I would take the .338.

    Luke

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