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Thread: Boat Towing Power

  1. #1
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    Default Boat Towing Power

    I am wondering if anyone has experience towing items with their boat from land into the water. Let's say you have twin 150hp Outboard's and want to tow a small cabin from land down to the beach. Is it even feasible? Different props? Would a 25hp tractor tow more? Obviously some round things would help to roll it on...
    I think real world experience is different from actual Foot pounds torque at lower unit? Thanks.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roybekks View Post
    I am wondering if anyone has experience towing items with their boat from land into the water. Let's say you have twin 150hp Outboard's and want to tow a small cabin from land down to the beach. Is it even feasible? Different props? Would a 25hp tractor tow more? Obviously some round things would help to roll it on...
    I think real world experience is different from actual Foot pounds torque at lower unit? Thanks.
    I've seen a guy drag a skiff up and down a gravel beach with his bigger skiff (twin 115's)
    I don't see why you couldn't pull a cabin down a beach as long as you have a good approach and something good to skid on


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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Be sure to take some video....
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
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    Quote Originally Posted by roybekks View Post
    I am wondering if anyone has experience towing items with their boat from land into the water. Let's say you have twin 150hp Outboard's and want to tow a small cabin from land down to the beach. Is it even feasible? Different props? Would a 25hp tractor tow more? Obviously some round things would help to roll it on...
    I think real world experience is different from actual Foot pounds torque at lower unit? Thanks.
    Some rather pertinent ifo missing: how large a SMALL cabin? Your small and my small will never be the same....And remember, there is always the jerk method (if SMALL cabin can withstand it) wherein one has a soft nylon line that stores energy like a rubberband and then jerks the load forward. Without experience, I don't recommend it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by copperlake View Post
    Some rather pertinent ifo missing: how large a SMALL cabin? Your small and my small will never be the same....And remember, there is always the jerk method (if SMALL cabin can withstand it) wherein one has a soft nylon line that stores energy like a rubberband and then jerks the load forward. Without experience, I don't recommend it.
    I suppose it would weight around 2000lbs.
    I didn't think of the "jerk method", and after the first tug, one has experience...lol

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    Make sure that the water is deeper than your stern depth :-) Never pull from the back of the boat??? I know when trying to lift something like a stuck pot that you should not hook to the back - not sure on towing a cabin...

    Use some blocks to gain mechanical advantage. You can easily triple your pulling capacity with blocks that are rated for your needs. Remember - it is not just the weight of the building you are moving, but also the friction that it takes to get it moving and keep it moving.

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    How about setting an anchor hard down near the water, and then using a block and tackle, a chainsaw winch or a regular cable winch to pull it down. It seems like this would be a much more controlled scenario with less that could go wrong, and you can move it slowly and watch to make sure you are not doing damage.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    How about setting an anchor hard down near the water, and then using a block and tackle, a chainsaw winch or a regular cable winch to pull it down. It seems like this would be a much more controlled scenario with less that could go wrong, and you can move it slowly and watch to make sure you are not doing damage.
    But that won't make for nearly as much entertainment on video!

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theultrarider View Post
    But that won't make for nearly as much entertainment on video!

    Yes, but it sure makes the most sense yet......!
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
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  10. #10

    Default Boat Towing Power

    IMO way less variables from land. Between wind, tide, swell, and keeping the dang line out of your props you will have your work cut out for you. Also stopping might be an issue once you get everything moving. If you try it make sure you are tied off square to the stern or your boat will just go diagonal in the water. The motors will put out a lot of power but at some point the props start slipping (cavitating).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    Be sure to take some video....

    my thoughts exactly!

  12. #12

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    some years ago I worked several days to move a cabin(12x16) on skids onto a frozen lake to be relocated to another part of the lake. we had about 6 guys, a bunch of heavy come-a-longs, chainsaw winches and such. it would have been so much easier to build a new one. yes, take pictures. best of luck.

  13. #13

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    Block and tackle is the way to go. Dig in a good deadman at the beach and the tractor will do the job just fine (with the right gear a atv will work). Unless you have a custom built boat I think the snap strap ideal could do a lot of harm to the boat. How far do you have to move it?
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