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Thread: Total weight of sheep hunting gear

  1. #1
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default Total weight of sheep hunting gear

    Did you guys weigh your packs fully loaded??? I did the other day and it weghed 67 pounds, a little heavier than I anticipated, of course 9 pounds of it is my rifle. I was told to have it around 50 pounds, as it looks now, if i kill something I will have to abandon my tent (6lbs) my sleeping bag (3.6lbs). Some things I have are bulky, for example my Scope and tripod, 3-8 oz. cans of MSR fuel. I am using the the Barneys frame and hunter pack and it's pack to the hilt, this also includes food for 12 days. Theres alot more stuff i did not mention but its things that I must have ( binos,Iridium phone, GPS, rain gear and extra set of clothes 3 pair socks, wipes, stove cookware, Ice ax and walking stick,water filter, sleep pad, extra ammo, camera, and hip waders and etc. Just wondering what the weight of your packs normally weigh, this is starting to worry me, have you abandoned gear before? ......K

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    That sounds about right for a 12 day trip. I just don't see how a guy can get much less. Pretty good actually if that's also your tent, stove and fuel. Items that are normaly shared.

    You could look at a Petzel Ice axe walking stick combo that might save you a little. I think they weigh about a pound. I'm not sure how you do your clothes but the clothes I take I can get all of the on at once if I layer them up. With the exception of extra socks and one extra set of poly pros.

    Of course this could be the perfect reason to buy new lightweight 6 or 7 lb rifle!
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  3. #3
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    Default Heavy Pack!

    When I see my husband packing his stuff, we discuss usually about 60lbs. As his sherpa, I usually would do about 40lbs.

    I think that you might want to consider a lighter tent eventually. I saw some tents that were pretty good at REI weighing at 3lbs 6oz. It was a North Face tent and it was durable (in wind) and easy to put together. Could be a little costly, though... it was about $230.00 (without the mail coupon of 40% off Independence Day).

    I think that Snyd is right and that you should be okay with a 67lb pack.
    If you think about it, if you just had a lighter tent, sleeping back, and rifle, you could save easily 7lbs.

    I see that you have a stove cookware, too. Have you considered the JetBoil? That might save you on a little bit of weight.

    Honestly, the only item on your list that I would consider leaving would be the ice axe. I guess it really depends on where you go. Where my husband goes, he doesn't take the ice axe and most climbs that I have done, I have never needed an ice axe unless we were glissading down the mountainside. You'll have your walking stick and that might suffice. What do you think?

    Watching your thread is getting me excited about seeing my husband put his gear together. My gear is already together in the trunk of my vehicle. Now, I just have to be 3100 miles north!
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    Default Pack weight

    Here are a few things to think about. You could leave the water filter at home and just use the iodine tablets. Buy the kind with the neutralizer tablets so the water doesn't taste as bad. Depending upon where you are going you may not need the gps. Usually you are following a drainage to where the sheep are and will eventually be above tree line. Just take a map and compass. Buy a lighter sleeping bag that is good to 15 - 20 degrees and you will save about 1.5 pounds. How much ammo are you carrying? Do you and your partner shoot the same caliber to save on how much you have to carry? I have never used more than 10 rounds on any hunt for a single species in AK. Food is also very heavy. I use two packs of oatmeal for breakfast, a peanut butter sandwich on a flour taco shell for lunch, a few cliff bars for snacks, and a mountain house for dinner. If you have quick drying clothes you don't need extra clothes other than socks. If you get wet just wear your raingear until your clothes dry out. Hipwaders are really heavy. If you just need to cross a few streams then buy some light weight waders that pull over your boots from the Wiggys store in Anchorage. They only weigh one pound. Can your partner carry half the tent and fuel? I think you should be able to cut 5 - 10 lbs off.

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    Default hip boots for mountains?

    I have waded a lot of streams up high without hipboots. When push came to shove I would tape my rainpants over my hiking boots.
    I am exploring Crocs, either the slipon or camp style boot. The slip ons weigh next to nothing, and would enable me to wade streams easier as my feet are soft.
    I know the GPS has some good things going and does not weigh much, but is it as dependable as compass and map? Which is lighter?
    My wife just bought collapsible light weight walking poles w/removable rubber tips. I haven't scaled them yet, but they are lighter than the old fiberglass ski poles I have used.
    I have to agree, the sleeping bag seems heavy. What type of pad do you have? A shorty ridgerest is light but gives enough insulation to warrant a lighter weight sleeping bag. The pad also gives me something to sit on and lean against rocks to be dry and comfortable.

  6. #6

    Default DO NOT plan to abandon gear.

    Long post alert!

    I have never abandoned any gear and believe it is unethical to do so. Everyone needs to follow the "leave no trace" mantra in order to preserve the beauty of Alaska. The only time you should abandon equipment is in an emergency. I'll step off my soapbox now. I am kind of obsessed with being minimalist with my pack weight, although I haven't cut my toothbrush handle yet. I am also going to be a bit rudementary, so please forgive me if it sounds like I'm talking down to you. Years of backpacking in AK have taught me a thing or two. I also worked at REI for three years, so I got to test out (and aquire a lot) of stuff.

    As others have mentioned, I would consider getting a lighter tent and bag. What about your sleeping pad, is it a lightweight Thermarest? Those are AMAZING. In total, lets assume these changes would save you about 5 lbs.

    Is your MSR stove liquid fuel or gas canister? If its liquid fuel, you will not need 24 ounces of fuel, they are much more efficient than the canisters. You could at least leave behind one bottle. That's another 1 lb.

    Are your clothes the light weight quick-drying type? Closely pay attention to what you are bringing for clothes. I agree with carrying an extra set of clothes, but keep them light and compact. Is your rain gear rubber or the Gore-tex type? If its rubber I would invest in some waterproof-breathable raingear, it makes a world of difference. Be careful to analyze what you will actually NEED for clothing.

    For food I eat what gives me the best calories per pound. Dried sausage is awesome for this. That will give you lots of energy for not a ton of weight. Same thing for rice, a lot of carbs for not a lot of weight and cheap. Follow AKHuntinFool on the food advice.

    AKHuntinFool is also right about the GPS. I have never found the need to own one just go to the USGS store at APU and get the topos for the area you are in. That'll save you space and weight. Same with the water filter, ditch it and use tabs such as Portable Aqua. Hip boots? Shed those babies, sheep don't live in the wetlands. I carry my lightweight running shoes for crossing streams. I also take my pants off when I cross creeks or rivers. Who's gonna see you or care, right?

    It amazing where you see you can shed weight when you step back and look at what you are bringing. Its a good thing that you're packing early so thaht you can avoid being overloaded. Based on these and others' suggestions I think you should be able to get your pack down to 50 lbs easy.

    Good luck!

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    Default Protein.. and more...

    Something that you might want to consider, too, are items that are high in protein that are light in weight. I know that there are TONS of protein powder items that you could purchase as well.
    Something that you might want to take into consideration (this is something that my husband always does when he does this hunt) is consider eating some of your meat on the mountain itself. He cooked for the last 2 guides that he has done.

    Have you come back and determined items that you might take off of your 'to bring list' to see what you want to take and keep yet?
    I'll be curious to see what they are.
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    I am getting great Ideas from all of you! but I forgot to mention this is a solo hunt, so no partner involved! I drew a goat tag for the same area, so it will be a scouting trip/ sheep hunt. I know I can trim on my tent and bag, but I have froze my butt off in a lighter bag before in a past experience, as for the tent its a mountain hardwear lightwedge II, and just can't justify buying a bivy tent for this hunt, I need to get my monies worth from this one. i was thinking about leaving the tent behind, and just using a sleeping bag gore tex bivy which is water proof also...anyone try this?. I would like to trim about 10 pounds, but what really bothers me more is the bulkiness of the sleeping bag, tent scope and tripod. I would like to pack some game meat back, also when I mentioned abandon, I didn't really mean leave it there for good, i really meant going back for it later. everything I have is the absolute lightest, I am using MSR pocket rocket, and only carry one titanium spoon, the pot to boil water weighs nothing, as far as clothes...its all new sitka gear and capilene with smartwool socks, and an impertech jacket that has half the buttons missing anyway. I believe the weight is the protein bars and mountain house and some toiletries, tooth paste wipes. waterless soap and quick dry towel, theres a lot of other stuff too, like a skinning knife and saw, gamebags, small first aid kit etc. I will go back and re-situate my pack...I just don't like getting all the way out there and regretting not bringing something, and aside from the 67 pounds, I was also considering bringing my revolver (63 ounces), just for some quick insurance on those who want to rip through tent while I'm asleep. ...Hmmmm....decisions, decisions....K

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    Wink A very good list!

    K. search the old archives for( Fullcurl Gear list for 2005.) It"s one of the best I"ve seen, he will give you all kinds of light weight ideas for a mountian hunter. Bill.
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

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    Backpacker Magazine just recently had an article on the best way to pack your pack in order to make your journey more effecient and easier on your back.

    After seeing what my husband went through last year, you are definitely going to want to bring a tent no matter what.

    Here are a few pointers:
    http://www.backpacker.com/article/1,2646,6533_P,00.html

    and another:
    http://www.backpacker.com/article/1,2646,6389_P,00.html

    I wished that I was able to find that article now... but the magazine is sitting inside of our place in our shop 3,100 miles from where I am currently at, therefore I can't just walk out of my outdoor office (the patio) and go inside and get it (like I usually would be able to).

    I am seriously thinking that if you leave your gear, you risk the chance of it getting lost. I personally agree with the other few posts where they say that if you take it up the mountain, you should bring it down the mountain.

    Solo hunt? I know that there was another person who posted about solo hunting. Have you taken the chance to read that thread. It's located in the Hunting area/forums and you might want to take a chance to read it if you haven't.

    Well, all in all... if you are completely secure in what you are taking and how you are going to pack, then I guess all I can say is that if you are confident that 67lbs is going to be okay... the take it and take it all. Have no reservations in doing it, too. There is no worse hunt or climb when you are wet, lost, disillusioned, or cold....especially on a solo hunt (or climb).

    ~COtoAK
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    I am going to have to look at that packing list by fullcurl, just wondering how you all are doing it with 60 pounds? Also,i have looked at the Barneys list too, i'm not sure how long your hunts are but my estimation for me is twelve days, I do have the time to stay out for a long time but don't think I have the food to sustain myself, nor could i handle what I am wearing without doing laundry, I am going to lay all my stuff out, and contemplate...your right I'm going to want the tent, its nice to come home to....K

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    Kal, for the type of hunting your going to do it all involves trade offs! How much comfort do you want vs. how much weight are you willing to carry? For my wilderness hunts, I"m not a sheep hunter 12, 000 $ is out of the question for me as I am a non. rez. I"ve switched to these.Go lite hut 1 tarp with Tit. stakes 15 0z? I can cook in my tarp in bad weather, a big advantage. 2 trek poles 18 oz.Snow peak Tit..mug with tinfoil lid 3 0z??, 20 oz. volume you need 16 0z, water for mt. house meals. Pocket rocket stove, 3 oz. + 1, or 2 fuel cells. All flece clothes outer pullover wind shear fabric, extra flece vest for extreams! One set of clothes, no changes. No GPS they only work when your moving, dangerous in the steep mountains/ ledges at night when watching the screen. Compass and Topo map. 22 x 70 Tyvek ground sheet .Aqua tablets for water in place of filter. Bladder type water bottles. TC Encore 7mm 08 handgun 4x leupold scope 4 lbs + ? 10 rounds of ammo. Repack items like toothpaste in 35 mm film cans etc. to save wt. / volume. An extra gun is alot of extra weight to lug around, remember you might have to pack an animal out. Go for one of the micro headlamps if you haven"t they work well. As others have said go with the Therma rest closed cell pad 14 oz. Frogg Toggs camo rain suit 17 0z. Evey time that I take someone on a backpack hunt who is new at it the first half hour is spent going through their stuff and leaving half the items in the car at the trail head! Bill
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongHunter7 View Post
    Kal, for the type of hunting your going to do it all involves trade offs! How much comfort do you want vs. how much weight are you willing to carry? For my wilderness hunts, I"m not a sheep hunter 12, 000 $ is out of the question for me as I am a non. rez. I"ve switched to these.Go lite hut 1 tarp with Tit. stakes 15 0z? I can cook in my tarp in bad weather, a big advantage. 2 trek poles 18 oz.Snow peak Tit..mug with tinfoil lid 3 0z??, 20 oz. volume you need 16 0z, water for mt. house meals. Pocket rocket stove, 3 oz. + 1, or 2 fuel cells. All flece clothes outer pullover wind shear fabric, extra flece vest for extreams! One set of clothes, no changes. No GPS they only work when your moving, dangerous in the steep mountains/ ledges at night when watching the screen. Compass and Topo map. 22 x 70 Tyvek ground sheet .Aqua tablets for water in place of filter. Bladder type water bottles. TC Encore 7mm 08 handgun 4x leupold scope 4 lbs + ? 10 rounds of ammo. Repack items like toothpaste in 35 mm film cans etc. to save wt. / volume. An extra gun is alot of extra weight to lug around, remember you might have to pack an animal out. Go for one of the micro headlamps if you haven"t they work well. As others have said go with the Therma rest closed cell pad 14 oz. Frogg Toggs camo rain suit 17 0z. Evey time that I take someone on a backpack hunt who is new at it the first half hour is spent going through their stuff and leaving half the items in the car at the trail head! Bill
    Kahahawai, I believe, is not taking a partner on his trip and has decided to hunt solo.
    I just wanted to respond by saying the last time my opposite sex climbing partner decided that 1/2 of my items packed was unnecessary, I fell into a creek (UP CREEK!!!) and more than 1/2 of my items in my bag gotten soaked. I was just thankful enough that he was respectful enough to understand that I had to get out of my soaked clothes immediately. He told me after the fact that I should have brought my other pair of boots. After a couple of miles into the climb, I knew that I didn't want to turn around just for dry clothes, so we kept moving on for 6 more miles. I never did warm up on that hike, either.
    I learned that if I believe that something is necessary to take, I am going to take it.
    I think that Kahahawai will need to make the determination if he WILL need it or if he THINKS that he may need it.
    Making the list and taking out all items is easier said than done, though...
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  14. #14

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    67 lbs seems awful heavy to me, but it all depends on what your taking, who makes it and how much it weighs. You will find that after doing a few sheep hunts that you learn things like:

    How much you actually eat each day.
    How much fuel do you actually use.
    What gear you keep bringing that you really dont need.
    A lighter tent would be great!
    A lighter sleeping bag would be great!
    A lighter gun would be great!

    And on and on and on, I have found that sheep hunting in itself will lead you to purchase a whole new array of lightweight gear that is sheep hunting specific. I have shaved lots of weight each and every year with newer lighter stuff and it makes life a lot more comfortable in the sheep mountains. If you itemized exactly what your bringing we could shave 10 lbs off your list without too much difficulty but it will entail you getting your checkbook out! <grins>

  15. #15
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    Default How much weight can you carry back?

    Solo, 65lbs outbound, over what distance, and I sure hope you find the goat of your dreams. Then what? A big goat with cape and horns will weigh what, 60 to 80lbs? Maybe more? Several years ago 4 of us went up out of Juneau for a goat hunt. My buddy got a beautiful big billy. After spending the night on the mtn we all split him up 4 ways and back to camp we went.
    That afternoon we broke camp and headed down as it was too hot and we were going to lose the meat if we stayed to look for another. As I recall that was still quite a load.
    I don't see anyway you can do it all in one trip out with that much weight. And if you can, I want you for my new best friend.
    Good luck, Best wishes, God speed, and be careful.

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    Default Tripod?

    With the caveat that I'm asking out of ignorance:
    Could you do without the tripod?

    Haven't tried it myself, but I've read some authors who suggest you can nestle your spotting scope into your daypack, or rest it on top, and have the stability you need to closely examine an animal, slope, climbing route, etc.

    What do you experienced mountain hunters think? Could kahahawai leave the tripod, or would that be ounce-wise and hunt-foolish?

  17. #17
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    Initially, my response is that he should take the tripod so that he could vividly judge the ram.
    I'll be curious as to what everyone else thinks.
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  18. #18
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    I'm taking the tripod without question, I use it for my digital camera with a self timer to take pics. The tripod weighs almost nothing! However the scope does not. The bottom line is: i'm trying to pack for 12 days, I can stay out there as long as i want as long as i check in at night via Iridium Phone. Also I am not taking a day pack, just my external frame pack, and everything is packed within dry bags. 67 pounds to me is alot , and will try to trim it down, but I'm not going to make a decision I'm going to regret. I was just curious how heavy everyones elses packs weighed? and for how long of a hunt...just curious....K

  19. #19

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    Dry bags? Are you talking about the heavy rubber type or a coated stuff sack? If you are talking about the heavy drybags for float trips, ditch those in a hurry and go buy some lightweight coated stuff sacks like what OR makes.

    I was originally going to suggest you went with your bivy, but 12 days is a long time to be living out of a bivy sack. Best to bring your tent.

    I'm just going to reitorate what I said before, at the very least leave at home the following: hip boots, GPS, water filter, extra handgun.

    Also, isn't it a bit redundant to have binoculars if you have a spotting scope as well? I might consider leaving those behind but then again I'm pretty fast with my spotting scope.

    With the Mountain House food: I ususally take the meals out and put them in zip-locks before the trip. The original packing is really bulky. Also, bring some stuff that is high fat and high protein like dried salamie.

    Chris

  20. #20

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    Your tent sounds pretty reasonable for sheep hunting but a consideration would be the Kifaru paratipi (http://kifaru.net/paratipi3.htm) at 3 1/2 lbs. We used a Kifaru 12 man on a moose hunt last September and let me say that a floorless tent is the way to go. That being said, my sheep hunting tent is mountaineering tent - a Terra Nova Ultra Quasar which is about 6.9 lbs.

    In my opinion, I'd drop the ice ax, water filter and hip boots. I've taken my boots and socks off to cross streams or just left my boots on and walked 'em dry.
    "The days a man spends fishing or spends hunting should not be deducted from the time he's on earth. " Theodore Roosevelt

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