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    Default No hot food on a trip

    Anyone ever go dry/cold food only? I have a couple longer hunts planned and want to go minimal as possible. Thinking of keeping the stove and the Mountain House at home. Still going to bring matches and fire starter. Any suggestions or dos and don'ts?

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Finaddict91 View Post
    Anyone ever go dry/cold food only? I have a couple longer hunts planned and want to go minimal as possible. Thinking of keeping the stove and the Mountain House at home. Still going to bring matches and fire starter. Any suggestions or dos and don'ts?
    Can you elaborate a little more what you mean by dry/cold food? Are you trying to eliminate weight, space, less cooking? If this is a weight or space issue you can't go wrong with mountain house. And as far as length of time goes, I think the expiration date for those mountain house is something like 50 years or something ridiculous like that.

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    Weight and space. The hunt is a walk in only goat hunt. Would like to get hide and all the meat out. It is going to be two big climbs to get where we want to get. Also, not cooking is a plus. I do enjoy a warm drink in the morning but I have drink heaters so that is not an issue. I just don't want to deal with the stove, pot, and I don't like Mountain House. They are horrible and I feel like death after eating them. They are poor fuel and weight to calorie ratio, are not that good. I rather take calorie dense whole foods. Think nuts, nut butters, high fat stuff, and jerky. More or less looking for any food options I might be missing or experience in this.

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Done cold food trips quite a bit over the years....granola bars, trail mix, jerky/sticks, vac sealed fish, dried fruit.....one of my favorite things is get a pack or two of bagels and pre fill em with cream cheese/ lox, pb&j, hard cheese/salami, etc....they keep well in cool temps and keep you going. Don't think I could go without hot drinks in the morning and evening anymore though....
    A food dehydrator might be worth looking into as well.

    P.S. I don't care for Mountain House much either...have hunted/fished/hiked/ climbed/floated backcountry in Alaska, YT, BC, Alberta, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, Nevada, and New Mexico....never carried it.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    For example a Mountain House package weighs 4.6 oz. Gives you 600 calories. I can take 3 oz of almond butter and get 600 out of it, less weight and a fraction of the size. Also I eat this stuff called Phat Fudge that is awesome. https://phatfudge.com/collections/fr...fudge-original I do enjoy a hot meal, but is it worth the extra weight? Also I find if I eat a lot of sugar I tend to get big crashes. Fat gives me a steady burn. On Adak I would eat a lot of bacon and PB that I would take along.

    Has anyone done a full on 10 day trip like this?

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    Seal Oil.

    Get it fresh, and it has almost no taste.
    Dip fresh or frozen fish and meats youve shot/caught on the journey, and the calories that the oil provides makes it worthwhile to thaw the meats in yer guts, on the go.
    100% natural, and no additives or preservatives
    Its immediately absorbable to the body and brings on a warmth that often makes you sleepy.
    Sea Mammal oil wont stick to your veins, much like fish oil.
    You can use it for candle fuel, gun lubricant and to bait traps

    Seal oil is the secret to Arctic fireless camping.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    Seal Oil.

    Get it fresh, and it has almost no taste.
    Dip fresh or frozen fish and meats youve shot/caught on the journey, and the calories that the oil provides makes it worthwhile to thaw the meats in yer guts, on the go.
    100% natural, and no additives or preservatives
    Its immediately absorbable to the body and brings on a warmth that often makes you sleepy.
    Sea Mammal oil wont stick to your veins, much like fish oil.
    You can use it for candle fuel, gun lubricant and to bait traps

    Seal oil is the secret to Arctic fireless camping.
    You sir are living the dream. One of my favorite shows to watch. Count your blessings my friend.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    For me, a hot meal at the end of a long, rainy day of packing meat - or especially when things didn't work out and I'm not packing meat - is worth it. I can't justify a hot meal in terms of calories, ounces in the pack and time, but in satisfaction...absolutely. But yes, a cold food trip is feasible. For me, though, the couple extra pounds are worth it and will never be the difference between me getting that mountain animal or not.

  9. #9

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    Yeah I suppose you are right. You theoretically could make that work. I would think you would have to pack some more food with carbs like dried fruit and trail mix, but I don't see why you couldn't make that work. I know what you mean about Mountain House. I get really tired of them after a few days as well. Plus it turns my crap into clay. I like your plan. Let us know how it works out for you. I suppose the other option is to combine a few mountain houses with your dry/cold food.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Finaddict91 View Post
    ...dry/cold food only....
    If you want something warmed a bit anyway, try this:

    Back when I was a kid down on the Mexican border lunch "sandwiches" were usually burritos with whatever in them. Wrapped in waxed paper and/or foil depending on contents, they were a constant in our young lives. Long about half an hour before time to eat we'd drop them down inside our shirts to rest against our bellies and warm up before time to eat.

    To this day the rustle of waxed paper or foil makes me hungry for a good burrito as those wrapped treats rustled around inside your shirt while you waited for time to eat. Belly-warmed burrito is still my favorite lunch on a river or hunt to this day. My favorite lunch drink is coffee. Warming the water against your belly for instant is surprisingly satisfying too.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  11. #11

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    I did a solo 8 day sheep hunt this past fall. I found water and early bedtimes to be key. I literally only took 10 granola bars and 4 mountain house for the whole hunt. I had a granola bar mid-day and a granola bar for dinner, or a mountain house mid-day and nothing else but water. I just rotated my days. I lost 18 pounds but felt fine until the last day when I had my last granola bar. I think it was more mental than anything just knowing I was out.

    Point being, you can go for a while on not much. I did eat blueberries and/or crowberries when I came upon them.

    I agree about mountain house though. I wish I'd just taken something else I could just put on a stick over a fire. I hate the heaviness after mountain house. Then again, I burned it off quickly.

  12. #12
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    I always try to gain an extra few lbs. Before I go out and kill a monster bull. Don't forget about foraging for unlikely food sources, such as ravens and other creatures you are bound to see along with your journey. Another trick I have relied on the past is choosing the proper hunting partner. Just make sure you are more agile and have less health concerns. I usually choose someone with arthritis or diabetes. Let's face it, if you need to survive the next few weeks, wouldn't you rather eat your partner as opposed to him eating you? That's why I stay away from youth hunts.

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    I bring so much food on sheep hunts, I usually gain weight. And it's real nice having a hot drink sitting there glassing in the mountains in miserable weather conditions. I'll never skimp on food, especially the hot stuff. I just can't comprehend going only with cold food, you're tougher than me!

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    I think some people get to obsessed with the ounces they are carrying, especially when omitting food to save weight.
    I could be wrong, but isn't the big picture to be able to hike as far as possible if needed? Not to have the lightest pack?
    There has to be a balance of bringing enough food (weight) and having enough energy for physical labor.
    I would think if you cut food down you are not going to have enough energy and you are more at risk having problems if an emergency pops up and need to stay a couple extra days.

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    Well I've taken plenty of goats on Baranof.....All salt to mountain. Where you going into? I might be able to help. I've hunted from Fish Bay down to Necker......Now I'm in Ketchikan. Food stuff...Yea makes sure your electrolyte balance is maintained. Don't change your dietary strategy too much from domestic life to mountain life. Know your body! If your an athlete you should understand your performance requirements. The physiology of the hunt is intertwined with the psychology of it. Maintain moral and you will maintain your endurance. I've traversed mountains on Baranof and done magnum work days. I won't say what to eat just that you should enjoy it and digest it well. I eat huge meals at night and morning....snack and drink electrolyte all day taking frequent small breaks. They are my reward for a job well done. Good luck and be prepared. It's January and I'm already hitting the weights for this upcoming August.

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    Quote Originally Posted by roybekks View Post
    I think some people get to obsessed with the ounces they are carrying, especially when omitting food to save weight.
    I could be wrong, but isn't the big picture to be able to hike as far as possible if needed? Not to have the lightest pack?
    There has to be a balance of bringing enough food (weight) and having enough energy for physical labor.
    I would think if you cut food down you are not going to have enough energy and you are more at risk having problems if an emergency pops up and need to stay a couple extra days.
    It's not about having less food. It is replacing calories with better options. Weight to calorie ratio with nut butters, jerky, and dried fruit, I can take more fuel with less weight. Not counting the elimination of a stove and cooking items.

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    Member brule's Avatar
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    I say go for it. I don't like hot meals when I'm backpack hunting. While it's great getting feedback and opinions from others, only you know how your body reacts and performs with various foods and nutrition. Some need more protein, some more carbs, some dehydrate quicker than others. It' kinda like the "what's the best boot question", only YOUR feet can answer that. Try out some different foods during strenuous training, you'll learn quickly.
    "One does not hunt in order to kill; on the contrary, one kills in order to have hunted"
    Jose Ortega y Gasset, Meditations on Hunting.

  18. #18

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    Read an interesting article how mountain climbers have been taking fruit cake on there climbs.full of nutrition and lasts along time. Probably not the lightest of food but just a thought for a little different taste on a hunt. Wouldn't be the same old dried up grainy taste.

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    Just eat what the goats do, cold meal you don't gotta carry and already up there.

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