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Thread: Keeping a boat over winter

  1. #21

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    How long does it take you to untarp your boat, Bull? And to get it covered again when you get home?

  2. #22
    Member MRFISH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grantypoo View Post
    How long does it take you to untarp your boat, Bull? And to get it covered again when you get home?
    I have a similar cover that runs bow to stern for my river boat (which doesn't see any winter use), but how many tie-downs (for wind) you may need to use to keep the tarp from flapping around is the biggest factor once you get a system worked out. I live on the east side of Anchorage, and prepare for the occasional high wind event, so I have two come-along straps that hold down the framing, and then 550 paracord on every other tarp grommet that tie to the trailer. By myself, I can get it off in about 30 mins and back on in about an hour; quicker, of course, with other hands to work on all the paracord tie-downs for the tarp.
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by grantypoo View Post
    How long does it take you to untarp your boat, Bull? And to get it covered again when you get home?
    With 2 people it takes about 10 minutes. Just me to put it back on takes about 15 minutes, less to remove it.

  4. #24

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    20 Ft Koffler Baybee, Canvas top, I built a 2 X 6 frame that tapers from bow to stern, Remove canvas, put frame up , and screw on OSB sheets, frame is braced, to boat floor, put tarp over OSB. I keep it shoveled and has enough pitch so snow will slide. Works well for the last 7 winters. About 2 hrs fall and spring to set it up and take it down. I leave batterys in boat and trickle charge them several times in the winter. Had a solar charger but it caused a boat fire , when regulator shorted. So no more !

  5. #25

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    Jeezus, what you cats go through without a self bailing deck is bizarre.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by copperlake View Post
    Jeezus, what you cats go through without a self bailing deck is bizarre.
    Does a self bailing deck do away with needing to cover your boat? It seems like it wouldnt, as water can still get down underneath the deck and freeze, expand, and wreak havoc on some welds.

    At least thats how the Duckworth or Raider boats that I've been looking at seem to operate. There isnt a hole in the boat right at the deck level for water to flow out, instead it flows under the deck and then out some scuppers which I believe are in the back.

    The Hewescraft, at least the Ocean Pro models I've been looking at, are not self bailing at all, everything goes into the bilge.

  7. #27

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    Trailer tongue up, gallon or 2 of minus -50 rtv antifreeze in the bilge, done. as far as the opening post on foam issues, every Hewes owner will have to deal with it eventually but it's not a huge deal just a process that takes some ingenuity and time. I've done it all on my boat and have 2 upcoming winter projects on others' boats for the same. If Hewescraft is still using treated plywood for the deck boards, they need to be replaced as they will (I've seen it) react and corrode the aluminum stringers. I replaced mine with untreated 3/4 ply and Matt treat em all sides with Speedliner and all edges 5200. Water only drains exactly under the bilge access doors. I'll post pics later, much mich better than factory bs.
    We fish all winter so just shovel snow as it comes.
    Ps- on the antifreeze, get the -50 stuff, not the -25, as I pics seen it freeze in warmer than -25 conditions.
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by grantypoo View Post
    Does a self bailing deck do away with needing to cover your boat? It seems like it wouldnt, as water can still get down underneath the deck and freeze, expand, and wreak havoc on some welds.

    At least thats how the Duckworth or Raider boats that I've been looking at seem to operate. There isnt a hole in the boat right at the deck level for water to flow out, instead it flows under the deck and then out some scuppers which I believe are in the back.

    The Hewescraft, at least the Ocean Pro models I've been looking at, are not self bailing at all, everything goes into the bilge.
    I've honestly never seen any water in the bilge on my duckworth


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  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by grantypoo View Post
    Does a self bailing deck do away with needing to cover your boat? It seems like it wouldnt, as water can still get down underneath the deck and freeze, expand, and wreak havoc on some welds.

    At least thats how the Duckworth or Raider boats that I've been looking at seem to operate. There isnt a hole in the boat right at the deck level for water to flow out, instead it flows under the deck and then out some scuppers which I believe are in the back.

    The Hewescraft, at least the Ocean Pro models I've been looking at, are not self bailing at all, everything goes into the bilge.
    My own skiff, a 7m house aft bow-picker style, has never been covered since I built it in 1993. By definition, self-bailing means that there are scuppers ABOVE the water line for to drain and a properly done means that no water gets below decks. The only reason builders like Hewes does the plywood is because of price point; it's a lot of work and material to make a true self-bailing skiff. There are also design issues too, like what kind of load can be carried without water flooding the decks, which also entails stability given that the higher the decks, the higher the center of gravity.

    The only time I have ever worried about snow load is when left in the water overwinter.

  10. #30
    Member akdeweyj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grantypoo View Post
    Does a self bailing deck do away with needing to cover your boat? It seems like it wouldnt, as water can still get down underneath the deck and freeze, expand, and wreak havoc on some welds.

    At least thats how the Duckworth or Raider boats that I've been looking at seem to operate. There isnt a hole in the boat right at the deck level for water to flow out, instead it flows under the deck and then out some scuppers which I believe are in the back.

    The Hewescraft, at least the Ocean Pro models I've been looking at, are not self bailing at all, everything goes into the bilge.
    Next time you are at a Hewescraft dealer ask to look at the Pacific Explorer - its the only self bailing deck model that they make.

    Another way to keep your boat from filling up with snow is to buy two of the car storage tents from costco or one of the bigger shelter logic storage tents from a i ouch & lag it down to at least one row of railroad ties so it stays in your yard. Then go buy an extendable roof rake to rake the snow off the tent every time it snows or it will collapse under the weight. You can get about 8-10 years out of the cheap skin they use on the costco tents & maybe a little longer out of the shelter logic tents. Keep a watch around your neighborhood to see if anyone else has a tent that collapses or blows away & you can score parts really cheap after a storm .

    FWIW - if you have a boat with a self bailing deck that lets water get under it, you should probably sell the boat.
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  11. #31

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    Thanks for all the help. The only slight change since I started this thread is we went with the 24' Ocean Pro instead of the 22'

    Looking forward to delivery of the boat in a week or two, and getting the snow obstructing device built.

    Oh yeah, and also looking forward to some Homer winter king fishing here soon.

  12. #32
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Put a 3 hunnerd on that 24 and never look back. The deck in the 24ís feels so much bigger!!


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  13. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    Put a 3 hunnerd on that 24 and never look back. The deck in the 24ís feels so much bigger!!


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  14. #34
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Itíll do good with that on it. What was the weight difference between the 220 and the 240? Trust me, you will LOVE the new boat.


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  15. #35
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    I kept a boat in Homer two winters uncovered. It had a deck that drained to the bilge. I kept the front jacked up and the bilge plug out and never had a problem. I would use it several times a winter. Homer has some pretty warm winters anymore, especially if you keep it close to sea level...

  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    Itíll do good with that on it. What was the weight difference between the 220 and the 240? Trust me, you will LOVE the new boat.
    The 220 is 3300 lbs, the 240 is 3600 lbs, so 300 lbs, negligible And I would have gotten the 200 Yamaha with the 22', so I gained 300 lbs of boat weight but 50 more horse going with the 250, I'm happy! Curious to see how she performs.

    Quote Originally Posted by akfunhog View Post
    I kept a boat in Homer two winters uncovered. It had a deck that drained to the bilge. I kept the front jacked up and the bilge plug out and never had a problem. I would use it several times a winter. Homer has some pretty warm winters anymore, especially if you keep it close to sea level...
    Good to know. It's actually the warm winters that bother me. I'm not worried about snow in the boat... I'm worried about when that snow warms up, turns into water, drains down into the foam and the bilge, then freezes solid. If it would just stay cold, I wouldnt be as concerned.

  17. #37
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    Hi Grantypoo,

    I had a 22ft Ocean Pro and then a 26 Pacific Cruiser that I over wintered in my yard here in Anchorage. It really wasn't a big deal at all. As others have suggested, I winterized the water system in both boats with RV anti-freeze, pulled the plug, and then completely wrapped the boat in a big tarp I bought from Lowes. I did use some PVC pipe to hold up the tarp in the back deck but that was about it. It was also helpful to get inside and run a heater once in awhile but that was mainly to dry out the interior so mold wouldn't grow during the warm periods.

    I had no problems with water getting into the bilge and neither boat had a self bailing deck so I wouldn't worry about getting the foam wet over winter, assuming you cover it. I think the wet foam is a much bigger issue when you are using it then when it's being stored. Just my 2 cents.

    Congrats on the new rig!

  18. #38
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    I have tarp'ed my boat in the past, as well as shrink wrapped, and now I just leave it. Mine is self bailing, but if it wasn't I would still do the same. Homer shouldn't have the winds the Anchorage hillside does, but here when it blows the tarp can do some damage banging on things. The last time I checked on Shrink wrap, it was more expensive than it was worth, although it is pretty windproof. Whatever you do, you might see if you can get someone to check in on it every month or two.
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  19. #39

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    I've worked on a few Hewes and mine included, every one of em has or will have the wet foam issue as well as the treated plywood deck (the underside of it) corroding the aluminum stringers it rests on. These are the 2 critical issues of every Hewescraft that has ever come off the line.
    Both of which are pretty easily corrected. I've got pics of what I found.
    Once that wet foam freezes one time, the cell structure of it breaks down and there you've added weight to the boat because it will never dry out nor drain down into the bilge. Most ignore it because it's not obvious and therefore is swept under the rug/deck
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  20. #40
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    I've worked on a few Hewes and mine included, every one of em has or will have the wet foam issue as well as the treated plywood deck (the underside of it) corroding the aluminum stringers it rests on. These are the 2 critical issues of every Hewescraft that has ever come off the line.
    Both of which are pretty easily corrected. I've got pics of what I found.
    Once that wet foam freezes one time, the cell structure of it breaks down and there you've added weight to the boat because it will never dry out nor drain down into the bilge. Most ignore it because it's not obvious and therefore is swept under the rug/deck
    I seem to recall that Hewes has done some modifications to the floor stringers so that the water more easily drains to the bilge instead of sitting there. All/most of the older models had this problem. Your boat is pretty old if memory serves.

    Did your floorboards have fully wrapped vinyl on them? If mine ever start getting beat up I will put aluminum down but so far (only a couple years old) they are doing great.

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