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Thread: Finally Solo'd

  1. #1
    Member Mr. Grayling's Avatar
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    Default Finally Solo'd

    Ladies and gentlemen,

    Over three years ago I started flight training. All seems like a blure now that I think about it. Today I flew 2.2 hrs in my ole 150 and finally solo'd at Palmer. Was quite the experience, one that I'll never forget. Now I need to finish the rest of my training requirements because the wife really wants to fly with me. On a side note, wind was crazy as we lifted from Wolf Lake airport, haven't flown in wind quite like that. Can't wait to practice again. Safe flying everyone.

    Jason
    "In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks." John Muir

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Nicely done! I recall my first solo like it was yesterday. My instructor didn't give me any warning - just stepped out "to pee", said take it around three times and slammed the door.

    I also recall being terrified once I was on downwind and looking at that empty seat next to me.

    How did you feel? Were the landings as smooth as when you had your instructor next to you?

    Again, congrats!

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    Member Wldlndfirefghtr's Avatar
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    Congrats!


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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    My first solo seemed like yesterday. I knew it was coming but didn't know when. We went up flew a couple laps around the pattern and we taxied over to the tie down spot and the instructor unbuckled his seat belt and said "now it will get off the ground faster without me in it go show me 3 touch and goes". It was fun!! Keep at it!!

  5. #5
    Member Mr. Grayling's Avatar
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    Brian,

    It's funny you mention being terrified because I remember turning left downwind and looking over to that empty seat. The one thing that stuck I'm my head was getting to pattern altitude and adjusting power, it's almost like he was still sitting there. I felt great, but the first landing I came in to fast and had to coast down the runway before touchdown. The second landing was more textbook.

    Jason
    "In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks." John Muir

  6. #6

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    Congratulations..........I have no memory of soloing, none. I do remember my first "Long" cross country. Horrible experience. Totally and completely lost, terrified lost. I think I was even in the "Wrong" Country. Out of fuel, pee'ed my pants, zero radio contact. Low ceiling, trying not to hit a large herd of horses, deep in some valley, narrow canyon walls, and a white water river full of large boulders........Just Horrible.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Congratulations,, special life event for sure. I remember my solo, October 3rd 1993, flew from Schofield Barracks to Ford Island. I landed and taxied over to the base of the control tower, my instructor opened the door and stepped out and said "give me 3 to a full stop and don't F it up". I taxied back to the runway and pushed the throttle in, training took over but I was still surprised at how quick N94401 lept into the calm morning air. As I turned crosswind I could see the Arizona below with oil still bleeding from her hulk. Had a death grip on the yoke as I turned base to final, but had a good landing. After the first, I actually relaxed a bit and took in the view and history. Good luck on your journey and congrats again.

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
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    My instructor did the same, told me to stop, got out and said 3 full stop and go's. I remember not really thinking about the first go around as I was concentrating hard. The second go around was when I realized the gravity of it and the freedom felt great!

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    Congrats are very much in order.....and while it needs to be judiciously approached, learning in wind makes for a better pilot, IMO.

    My first solo (decades ago!) still stands out as triggering a major geospatial event: how could that nice long runway that the underpowered anemic 150 departed from have become so small in the time it took to get to pattern altitude (900' at Merrill) and halfway down the downwind leg? After 3-4 landings, the runway grew back to more proportional dimensions, but man it looked small to start with.
    Back in AK

  10. #10
    Member Mr. Grayling's Avatar
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    Thanks for the words of wisdom and stories
    "In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks." John Muir

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    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
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    Very nice. I remember my first solo as well. It was a very cold day in late January not that many years ago. Out of over 700 hours of flying so far, and many, many adventures, that is still my most memorable experience flying! Congratulations and hope your flying and learning is as good as mine has been!

    This was leaving Wasilla airport that morning.



    And this was after stopping in Willow so he could "get out and put his carharts on... He told me to take it for a few spins around the pattern while he put them on...

    US Air Force - retired and Wildlife photographer

    To follow my photography adventures check out my facebook page

  12. #12
    Member Mr. Grayling's Avatar
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    Nice photo's. I have always enjoyed your pictures and stories. I thought I was going to solo at the Wasilla airport after doing some pattern work, but we ended up doing power on/off stalls and steep turns over the flats before heading to Palmer. It has been sometime since I landed at Willow but I always enjoyed the dirt runway when I first started flying an old taildragger 140.
    "In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks." John Muir

  13. #13
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Congrats. I used to live near Wolf Lake 18 years ago. But I had my plane over at Anderson Lake strip. I still remember my instructor jumping out of the back seat of the Super Cub halfway along the runway. I darn near whacked a bunch of spruce trees on my first solo take-off.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
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  14. #14

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    GREAT JOB!!!
    The trick to flying a lot is plan ahead!! Start today and make plans to fly every month for the next year. I mean get a hotel in Nome and fly to it!!! Now brake it in to months, what will you do in Dec. Jan has the Northern Lights 300. go fly to Skwentna and see the dogs. Feb has Iron Dog race. Starting in May fly out every weekend. Get some other pilots to show you the ropes and they can fly the wife. Plan to have your lic by June Alaska and the view from the edge is waiting for YOU!!! I followed a 150 above the Brooks range a few year ago because they are faster than my cub.


    My first solo take off was a Goose Bay, I forgot to add flaps to the pacer before I started the ground roll. Had to bend over to pull flaps and when I set back up I was headed to the trees on the left. Locked the brakes and spun around and taxied back. Old Herb came over and opened the door I said "I got it" pulled the door shut and gave it the gas!!! Once I was on down wind I got to thinking if that was the day I would die!! Fast forward 10 years and 1250 hours now I have a Cessna 180. Kicked the CFI out, and did not make the flaps mistake. But downwind I was hoping I would not screw up!!!!
    Denny

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