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Thread: Grumman 19 question

  1. #1
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    Default Grumman 19 question

    This is a basic question for many of you: if you are slowly motoring up or across river and approach standing waves, how big can the waves be without taking on any water? Assume load of 500 pounds.

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    Good question , lot depends on your rig like do you have # 1 a good lift ? # 2 how deep the water is ? , # 3 type an size of motor ?
    # 4 are you standing or sitting ? # 5 do you have runners on the bottom of Grumman , # 6 your experience . being able to read the river,
    from passed trips it can take a lot , PS never had a ruler with me , there are so many things can affect what you ask ,
    Most of the time you just plow through the waves with the power an speed of the motor , I will say if you have a 2 cycle 15 HP it will do a lot.
    you will need the motor speed an power to over come the water going every way that you don't want go.
    the 19 Ft don't like waves in large lakes, the waves can cause AIR to get under the canoe making it tip-e when that happens look out ,
    just remember you need power an a little speed to control the canoe going up or down a rivers I hope this helps , the mud buddies
    type on motors ? I don't know , SID MY 2 CTS on the question you asked

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    Sid, are you comfortable going through 18” standing river waves?

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    Like Sid said, a lot depends on a variety of factors. The angle you are approaching them is one of the biggest. Going straight up through them, no problem at all. Going across at an angle is where you might have difficulty, especially if you don't have the power to control it. I typically run mine standing up in any rough water so I have more control of the boat. I can rock it one way or another to help compensate for waves or to help "trim" it when cornering so you don't dip the gunnel too far on the inside if there are any standing waves to worry about. Also, loading of the boat makes a big difference. If you are too bow heavy, it can be hard to control since the bow will act as a rudder way out front and just pull you around. Loaded too far back and the bow will be out of the water and the boat will be very twitchy making it hard to control. The nice part with a canoe is it can roll with the waves as opposed to a wide, flat bottom boat like a river boat, that tends to stay flat and allow the waves to come over the side. It isn't a very comfortable feeling to roll around that much, but it does give you some more margin of safety in the big picture if you know how to handle it.

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    anchskier hit some points I did not , a lot depends on "" YOU "" how to read the water helps a lot . an the power to put the canoe
    where you want it to go, you need to have some [ A LOT ] time in the canoe , seeing just what YOU can do with it , the power on the back end sure
    helps to just power threw the ruff section , also how dleft eep the water is, A rock will stop you so fast you wont know what happen ,
    If you are running real shallow rivers with lots of ROCK some people put runners on the bottom [ 1 inch alum. channel ] to help protect the skin on
    your rig . remember, running a canoe standing up, some thing that takes time to learn , I think SID
    PS anything we can do to help you out , do let us know , 3 things you need to do it correctly
    # 1 a tiller extenuation [so you can stand]
    # 2 one of the old motor lifts so you can hold on to the handle with the left hand ,
    # 3 the canoe brace in front of the operators seat to help brace knees against when it gets ruff going, to help control the canoe like anchskier said
    your body movement helps a lot

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    Thanks both. I am asking what you can do. By way of analogy, on my 20’ Lund Alaskan tiller I am comfortable quartering into 4’ waves. I will not go bigger. Someone else trying it might swamp the boat. But I am alert and careful, and know what I am doing. I am sure you do too. If you say you are good around 18” waves approximately, I can translate that to my abilities and conditions.

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    A canoe is not a boat an don't think it is , lot lighter, when you quartering into waves ??? sounds like big water an canoes don't like big water waves,
    water will come over the BOW real fast ,

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    Just an analogy about what I can do versus what others can do. I would not quarter a canoe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by billfish1984 View Post
    Just an analogy about what I can do versus what others can do. I would not quarter a canoe.
    For me, each situation is unique. On a lake, I don't mind quartering INTO some waves but you have to watch how the boat is handling. I HATE quartering waves from behind because you can easily end up "surfing" the wave. The long length of the canoe can then cause the bow to auger into the next wave and roll you over. On a river, things are a bit different. I usually would not quarter into waves on a river. If I needed to get across where the waves were, I would point the boat straight upstream and then "slide" across slowly by gently turning to the side but not really letting the boat turn sideways. My experience is on pretty narrow rivers, so haven't had much need to cross a river in standing waves, just travel up or down through them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    For me, each situation is unique. On a lake, I don't mind quartering INTO some waves but you have to watch how the boat is handling. I HATE quartering waves from behind because you can easily end up "surfing" the wave. The long length of the canoe can then cause the bow to auger into the next wave and roll you over. On a river, things are a bit different. I usually would not quarter into waves on a river. If I needed to get across where the waves were, I would point the boat straight upstream and then "slide" across slowly by gently turning to the side but not really letting the boat turn sideways. My experience is on pretty narrow rivers, so haven't had much need to cross a river in standing waves, just travel up or down through them.
    Gotcha; is there a general size you don’t like to power or slide through with a 19’ Grumman?

  11. #11

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    I've never really paid too close of attention to the wave height, just go off of gut feeling when I am there and what other factors are in play at the time (loading, water depth, etc...). If I had to put a number to it, I would say somewhere in your 18" range although I would prefer smaller.

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    Thanks Anchskier!

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