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Thread: Beware of Scammers Responding to Cragislist Boat Ads

  1. #1

    Default Beware of Scammers Responding to Cragislist Boat Ads

    Just a warning to be wary of Craigslist responses. Just reposted my boat on Craigslist last night and have had two different scammers contact me.

    The first was an E-mail labelled as from Paul Peterson, asking if it was still available, when I e-mailed back, I got an offer of $140,000, $110k more than what I'm asking, with no questions about the boat's condition.

    The second was a text message from (904)770-7647 saying I have new Craigslist messages and an attachment that says tap to preview, I did not tap because I have never gotten a message from Craigslist that way. I think someone else warned of this scam a few weeks ago.

    Also had a phone call with no message from a Las Vegas number may or may not be connected.

    If you are posting or replying to posts on Craigslist, read through their "Avoid scams and fraud" link on the main page. This is the first time I've gotten this many within a day of posting.

  2. #2
    Member oakman's Avatar
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    I have had a lot of problems with this in the past. Typically with items that are more expensive (vehicles, furniture, etc. vs. smaller items or free stuff). My method of screening them is to have them make a comment about the ad, the local weather, make them include a local phone number, etc.

    Then if you get a response that doesn't include what you ask, you just delete it.

    Most of my problems have been exactly as you describe. They ask if it's available and once you respond, they start their scam.

  3. #3
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Similar activities associated with just about any item posted these days, be it wheelers, vehicles, snow tires.... The scammers are prolific these days.

    Quote Originally Posted by oakman View Post
    They ask if it's available and once you respond, they start their scam.
    Yup. Or they want you to text or call a long distance number...which gets you a large third party fee charged to your phone plan, or additional spear-fishing and potentially stolen personal information. Clink on a link of any kind and get spy/malware downloaded to your device... It's the world we live in now.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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    This has gone on for some time. The simplest solution is, after the first text, text back: I will hereafter only communicate by voice. The lengthy replays of why they can't do so get trashed. Every once and awhile I enjoy sending them a rather incisive reply for jollies. The text thing that everyone is addicted to is the heart of the problem. Nearly everyone these days spells the phone number in some crazy quilt way to avoid this hoovering of text data.

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    I've found by checking the don't use email box and only listing a local land line number eliminates the scams.

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    Member Micky_Ireland's Avatar
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    Very interesting thread indeed. Where’s this exact scam aimed towards and to what advantage do they seek to gain from doing so. Is it automated by bots ( not sure what their purpose is ) and does revolve around some money feedback to them ?

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    Member Meanderthal's Avatar
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    I'm not worried about getting sucked into a scam. Sometimes I just play along with them for awhile just to frustrate them and waste their time. I'm more concerned with telling them where I live. I've never had any problems with someone that I met in person but if they seem sketchy I'll ask to meet at a neutral location.

  8. #8
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Micky_Ireland View Post
    Very interesting thread indeed. Where’s this exact scam aimed towards and to what advantage do they seek to gain from doing so. Is it automated by bots ( not sure what their purpose is ) and does revolve around some money feedback to them ?
    Scams are various, but often involve the 'buyer' sending you a bad check for more than the amount due, with some ploy whereby you are supposed to cash it and pass the 'extra' funds on to a third party, such as a 'shipper'. The check ultimately bounces and the bad guys pocket your money, as well as the item you 'sold' them.

    Others want you to call, text, or send a photo of the item you're selling to a long distance number which subsequently applies a fraudulent third party charge to your phone bill/data plan.

    Or, once they get a two way dialog going, somewhere along the way they will trick you into clicking something that downloads mal/spyware on your phone/device, or they will send you a photo of the item they are supposedly selling, and the photo will have malware code embedded in it.

    Others may engage you in conversation so as to record your voice, or call but not say anything with the hope you will say a few phrases such as "who is this", "stop calling me", etc. Just a few short digital voice samples like that are enough for them to digitally replicate/synthesize your voice into whole conversational sentences to be used in more elaborate banking theft schemes.

    Vehicle ads are a popular leader and are pretty easy to spot. This is a scammer's ad: https://fairbanks.craigslist.org/cto...326924232.html

    This crap is rampant these days and organized crime is behind most of it. You have to be really wary and careful.

    The more sophisticated of these same type outfits are the likes of which put false crap on Facebook to influence the way people vote. And tens of thousands of people fall for it. Many people are not terribly bright.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

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    Member Micky_Ireland's Avatar
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    Fantastic answer. Iv'e actually seen a lot of them type of adverts on craigs list and in particular with the trucks and boats for sale.The same sort of scam was running wholesale in Ireland a few years ago. Cars, trucks, and real estate were targeted with wanton regard for the law. They actually had to re-legislate and update consumer protection laws to protect private buyers from these scams. The biggest problem we had in Ireland was that some of the more sophisticated gangs actually had stolen legitimate bakers drafts (not sure if the american financial system has them). Basically, these were a rock solid "guaranteed cheque" given from a national bank covering the cost of the transaction. The biggest problem the vendor has if entering into these transactions is if enforcement is needed and whether law enforcement has jurisdiction over the purchaser.

    I can tell you the likes of craigs list and other re-sale site are prime for the easy pickings of some of these gangs. People also seem to forget or like to deny the out right sophistication of some of the gangs involved. Many of the gangs used in Ireland were from far off countries that could spin and send money any where around the world. There was also a phone scam just like you have stated that originated in Ghanna. They were making millions from it.

    If in doubt get the transactions done via a reputable lawyer at the least.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post

    Vehicle ads are a popular leader and are pretty easy to spot. This is a scammer's ad: https://fairbanks.craigslist.org/cto...326924232.html
    "...and also it transforms heads." Classic! Why wouldn't I want a truck that does that?!

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    try posting your stuff on "Alaskas list"

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