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Thread: widening the stern on a Scott HB

  1. #1
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    Default widening the stern on a Scott HB

    anyone have any experience with widening the stern of a Scott HB? i don't think this is necessarily a DIY job, but it may have to be. i'd like to get the butt of mine wider. no, i don't want to buy a riverboat again, thanks. along that line, is there a competent fiberglass shop in fairbanks in case i don't want to DIY this? just dreaming.... cheers. john

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    Just out of curiosity, why do you want to widen it?

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    because it sinks too deep, and i am hoping that with it higher i get better economy and stability. thanks. j

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    I seem to remember a phot essay about widening the stern on a different freighter. Maybe Michael Manzo? I'll look for the link.

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    ok. thanks.

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    Might take a look at the James Bay, for some reason Scott Canoe extended the bottom fully to the transom on it. It will carry a lot more weight at the back than a Hudson Bay.

    My James Bay was bought as a package directly from Scott Canoe and towed to AK with a 50hp Honda tiller factory installed, it has planning speed with decent economy and is shallow running. Granted its a wider but only a foot longer than the Hudson Bay. I think filling in the wineglass or whatever before the transom on a Hudson Bay would help support a heavy surface drive and raise the stern.....

    Good luck with your project!

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    thnx, rod, but the JB is too heavy. it adds another 125 lbs, and the HB is hard enough to row as it is. i suppose a guy could haul another craft for floating in that sucker, though. i will have to ponder this, but the idea of buying another craft is an obstacle. is your honda a jet, or prop?

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    I don't think running a wine-glass stern is the way to go on Interior rivers, that is a deep water design...

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    there is / was a canoe MFG. in Tok. that knows a lot about canoes an he builds a similar canoe give him a call an talk , it will not cost much .
    he is on this web sith as a supporting member , I think , SID

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sid View Post
    there is / was a canoe MFG. in Tok. that knows a lot about canoes an he builds a similar canoe give him a call an talk , it will not cost much .
    he is on this web sith as a supporting member , I think , SID
    I think he is in Delta, probably out hunting somewhere though.

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    piper: thanks, but i'll pass. john

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    JK.

    Opening up the back of that HB to widen it would be a bugger of a job IMO and could run a good canoe.

    Before doing that, I'd explore building a set of sponsons to bolt on low in aft of canoe. Commercial sponsons are usually foam and are set
    high on sides of canoe. Nearly a century ago, Old Town had cork sponsons on some of their canoes IIRC. Of course, yours would be quite different, as they would need to be larger but there is some wonder materials out there today.

  13. #13

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    I like the wine glass stern for following seas in big water, Vern has the right idea in my opinion. The HB Canoe is not made to be a big skiff, but a capable big water canoe, it works best with a outboard not pushed to hard.

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    thnks. the sponsons idea is about what we have been thinking about; something that is an add-on as opposed to destroying the original canoe. these would only come into play when the motor is cranked up, thus leaving the canoe, essentially, the canoe. i've even wondered if some kind of planing plates on the transom would be effective at all, like the plates you bolt to the lower unit of a motor, or like trim tabs. somewhere, someone has figured this out already.....

  15. #15

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    I ran the Hydro Shield on my Scott Hudson Bay it would lift the motor at planing speed and drive the bow down, plus protect prop.

    John send me a PM and call Kurt

    https://www.google.com/search?q=Hydr...s=chrome.2.69i

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    kk: done. j

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    Quote Originally Posted by jklingel View Post
    thnks. the sponsons idea is about what we have been thinking about; something that is an add-on as opposed to destroying the original canoe. these would only come into play when the motor is cranked up, thus leaving the canoe, essentially, the canoe. i've even wondered if some kind of planing plates on the transom would be effective at all, like the plates you bolt to the lower unit of a motor, or like trim tabs. somewhere, someone has figured this out already.....
    JK,

    I think you are on the right track.....planing surfaces......i've used the type that go on outboards and they lifted stern significantly when power is applied.......I've often thought of bending come aluminum planes and bolt to the side of the canoe in the rear few feet.....

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    vern: thanks for the faith! i've been thinking about the hydro shield way back from the canoe and think it would be a liability instead of an asset. i can see it digging in when you make a sudden, sharp turn and with all that leverage on the canoe it would be swim time. too, any lift you get way back at the prop is going to put serious torque on the transom. for those reasons, something on the canoe makes more sense. just gut feelings. j

  19. #19

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    Yea a Hydro -Shield is great for a Outboard not so for a Mudbuddy . Look at the old double ended dory mods for a bigger outboard they used a board the kept the boat from squatting as it planed.

    The museum at Homer used to have a double ended dory that had this modification, I had a old double ended dory with a tombstone transom with a center well it was about 22' and would do about 12 MPH with a 15 HP any faster and it very unstable, a displacement style hull , not a planing hull.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=disp...w=1098&bih=488

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    I was thinking this project through.
    Couldn't one rough up the "hollows" of the wineglass portion, then apply a high quality, high density spray on foam.
    Over spray it, and then sculpt these two ares down to fit the lines of the hull itself, back to the stern/transom.
    Take it down a hair further, then apply fglass and resin over all and blend in to existing hull. Then gel coat it.
    The intent is to provide flotation, and as the existing transom is the structural portion, this filling in and covering process would only have to be strong enough for normal wear and tear.
    I would think this would be a relatively straight forward albeit smelly project. One could even use Kevlar matte rather than fglass.
    With some patience I think you could blend it in quite seamlessly with the original hull.
    Never wrestle with a pig.
    you both get dirty;
    the Pig likes it.

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