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Thread: CANON EOS Digital REBEL XTi

  1. #1
    Member Formerly Montana Bob's Avatar
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    Question CANON EOS Digital REBEL XTi

    Well it's about time to do a camera upgrade. My Optura 20 1.3 just does not produce the pictures I am seeing out there that everyone is taking.
    I like the Canon products and am looking at the CANON EOS Digital REBEL XTi . Seems there are lots of options out there for this camera and am wondering how it will do for my hunting an fishing pictures.
    Any one have any good or bad on this camera. Searched the site and could not find any info.

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    Default Great Web sites

    http://www.steves-digicams.com/
    http://www.bobatkins.com/photography...00dlenses.html

    FMB: If you check out the two sites I posted above, there are reviews on both. Steve's has an incredibly in depth review of all cameras. Also, Costco has for under I believe $800. I have also heard great things about B&H, and I did well when I bought a 70-200MM F4 "L" lens from Amazon. I have the Canon Rebel XT and love it. Would have preferred a 30D, but have to live within our means, correct? I think I get fairly good shots, I posted one here last week "Reflections." Hope this helps, if you have any questions, let me know.

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    It's a good camera. It's not the cheapest DSLR out there these days, but perhaps you're getting what you pay for. There are some complaints about the right hand grip feeling too cramped, but I suppose it depends on the size of your hands. It feels ok to me, and I do like the small size of the camera.

    You could save a few bucks by buying the older XT model instead, but the AF system was improved a bit, and the XTi adds another 2 Megapixels. Not that you can tell the difference in the images. Once you cut that sized sensor up past 6-8 megapixels you are facing diminishing returns.

    You could also save by buying Nikon's D40, and it does feel nicer in your hand, but if I was buying into a system now I would take a serious look at Pentax's K100D, or K10D. They include image stabilization in the camera body, and that makes all your lenses IS. Buying IS lenses for Nikon or Canon will cost a bunch - but they are worth it. Many fewer blurry pictures.

    I bought into Canon's system years ago and haven't regretted it, but there are other good options out there. Whatever system you choose, take care, it can quickly become an addiction. Perhaps it's too late for you already?

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    Another thing Formerly, are you sure you want a removable lens camera? They are great, and have a lot more capabilities, including faster operation, higher image quality, and are superior in dim lighting, but to make good use of them you have to also buy at least two good lenses. And then you have to be willing to pack them around with you. If photography is going to be your hobby and passion none of this is a problem, just plan on spending some money for good lenses.

    A good option for many people wandering the hills is a small superzoom point & shoot. They have their limitations, are slower, and don't see in the dark as well, but are capable of very good results.

    I have been using a Panasonic FZ5 for a couple years, and an FZ3 before that for most of my outdoor trips. I pack it in a nice compact Pellican box to keep it protected and waterproof when not being used. The FZ series has optical image stabilization, and a good lens that covers every thing from 35mm to 420mm. A pretty good range for a 12x zoom. Canon's S5 IS is another good contender in this category.

    If you do opt for one of these types, make sure you get one with real optical image stabilization. There are a lot of imposters out there with "digital stabilization" and other words to that effect. Avoid them. And ignore "digital zoom" as well. It's digital hokus-pokus and none of it works for anything more than selling cameras to the unsuspecting.

    I'm not trying to dissuade you from buying a DSLR, I have and use a couple of them, but I do want to make sure you know what your options are.

  5. #5
    Member Formerly Montana Bob's Avatar
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    Default Thanks for the info.

    FMB: If you check out the two sites I posted above, there are reviews on both. Steve's has an incredibly in depth review of all cameras. Also, Costco has for under I believe $800. I have also heard great things about B&H, and I did well when I bought a 70-200MM F4 "L" lens from Amazon. I have the Canon Rebel XT and love it. Would have preferred a 30D, but have to live within our means, correct? I think I get fairly good shots, I posted one here last week "Reflections." Hope this helps, if you have any questions, let me know.
    I checked out the review and it was positive. Also took a look at your (Reflections) picture and it was sweet.
    I posted a picture I took of myself here in Sitka a couple of days ago and as you can see the picture is pretty crappy.
    Thanks again
    Last edited by Formerly Montana Bob; 08-16-2009 at 10:31.

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    Default XTi

    I have the Rebel XT, not the XTi, and I love it. I've had it for a little over a year. I also have a good friend that has had the XTi and is absolutely crazy over it. He and his wife went to Austrailia and his camera gear (XT) was stolen in LAX out of his luggage. No pix, only memories.

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    Default Rebel XT

    Sometimes you can clean up the sky and darken and such in Photoshp Elements or Photoshop CS...know little about them, have Elements, but still learning. Whatever you do purchase, make sure you carry a spare battery. I learned the hard way yesterday at Denali...thank goodness I had my Olympus UltraZoom, though I much prefer the XT!

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    Taken with a Rebel XTi and the kit 'nifty-fifty' lens...

    honu moored up at Moser.jpg

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    Default Nikon D40

    I am by no means a photographer but always wanted a really good camera. I recently purchased the Nikon D40 and I have to tell you that camera is awesome. I have never seen quality like what comes out of that. I also purchased a 70-300mm telphoto lens with it and that to is just amazing. I beleive the whole package ran me around 800 dollars. If you would like to see some pics I took with it right out of the box the day I got it please pm me. Thanks

  10. #10

    Default Rebel

    I've been looking into getting into the digital world. Been looking at the rebel xti body only and want to get a good zoom lens. I have some questions though, I think a 70-300mm lens will suit me for now. In research there are abbrev. I don't know. DO, USM, telephoto vs zoom. What does it all mean??

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    Member trapperrick's Avatar
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    Default

    Bowtechshooter, Nikon has always made top shelf cameras. I also have an N70 film camera and I've had a couple of other Nikons before that; you certainly can't go wrong with them. Canon just seems to give a little more bang for the buck in my opinon. I have a buddy with a D200 Nikon, huge honkin' lens, about $5g's. He fires about 8 shots (10mp) a second. I have serious lens envy, LOL.

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    Default For outdsman

    USM - ultrasonic motor
    DO - diffractive optic (DO) lens
    IS - Image stabilization
    Recommend the following two links:

    http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/co...ategoryid=2533

    http://www.bobatkins.com/photography...00dlenses.html

    Can learn a lot there. I have the Canon XT and love it, though you can get into some expensive lenses. It's all what you want. I had a friend scoff over a $350 fly rod outfit; I asked him which I'd use more, that or a deer rifle where season was 30 days a year. To each their own. Enjoy the links.

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    To add to what dmaclean answered...

    USM focusing motors are faster and quieter than normal arc form motors, but to confuse us Canon makes two types of USM motors: USM micro motors are quiet and slightly faster than non USM, but not much faster. Ring type USM is considerably faster, and allows for Full Time Manual focusing (FTM), where you don't have to switch the lens into manual focusing to touch up the focus after auto focusing. I know that sounds like a marginal feature, but it really is nice in practice. No 70-300 or 75-300 lens has ring type USM, so it's a very marginal upgrade but only adds about $30 to the price of the lens. Canon's 70-200 f/4L has a ring type USM and focuses considerably faster, as well as offering FTM.

    Canon's 75-300 lenses are generally sold for between $150-200, depending on who's selling it and if it has the micro USM or not. Canon's 70-300 IS lens (not the DO and not the 75-300 IS) is a considerably better lens optically, and includes Image Stabilization. It sells for over $500, but is worth it if you are looking for good quality images. Canon's 70-200 f/4L sells for about the same, but it isn't as long (doesn't zoom in as close). However it is even better optically, is built better, and has that very fast ring type USM focus with FTM.

    IS (Image Stabilization) is a feature that has become very highly sought after, especially in longer (tele) lenses. It's handy in shorter lenses too though. It adds $200-500 to the price of the lens, but in my opinion, is worth it. It allows you to take pictures hand held in lower light situations where otherwise you would need a tripod to hold it steady. In long lenses this feature can not be underestimated for usefulness. A tripod is still important, but can be used in fewer situations if the lens has IS.

    DO (Diffractive Optics) allows long lenses to be made much shorter than normal and still not loose excessive image quality. Canon's 70-300 DO lens costs about twice the non-DO lens. It has only about equal optical quality, but it is smaller, adds the ring type USM (with FTM). So it focuses faster and fits in smaller bags -- all for a mere $600 additional.

    Telephoto (or tele) has a technical meaning for a lens that is shorter physically than it is optically (yes, I know, there is more to it than that, but...), but the term has come to mean any lens longer than a normal lens. Normal for a Canon Digital Rebel is about 30mm. A longer lens allows things that are more distant to look larger in the camera's view. It's like looking through a telescope or binoculars. Shorter (wider) lenses make things look smaller but take in a wider view of the scene. There are times you want one or the other, so neither one is to be preferred over the other. But if you want to take pictures of bears and other critters, a long lens will generally be required. 300mm is about the minimum.

    "Zoom" means any lens that can vary it's optical length, often going from very wide to medium wide, or from wide to tele, or from short tele to long tele. The 18-55, 70-300 or 70-200 are all zoom lenses. Some people use the term "zoom" to only refer to a long lens, but this is an error. There are some 18-200mm (wide to long tele) zoom lenses out there, but the usual advice is, there are too many optical compromises made in them for serious use. Still they are fun to use, and can still take nice images.

  14. #14

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    Thanks for the info, it has been much appreciated. I think a 70-300mm lens with USM IS will suit my needs. Is there an affordable option for anything higher power, say a straight 500mm or 600mm.

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    Sigma's 50-500 "bigma" is said to be pretty good for a $1000 lens.

  16. #16

    Default Xt vs XTI vc Nikon D40

    I'm a novice just looking into a SLR, I don't want to spend money for options I'll never use. What kind of comparisons are there from the Canon XT, XTI and sound like the Nikon D40 is a good one.

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    http://www.steves-digicams.com/

    This link has reviews on all cameras. Hope it helps.

  18. #18

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    I've read the reviews but I'd like to hear from someone with hands on experience the differences. The xti talks about the dust cleaning sensor. Is the XT hard to clean? Will the XTI have mechanical problems longterm? At what point will the extra megapixals make a difference?

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    Quote Originally Posted by outdsman View Post
    I've read the reviews but I'd like to hear from someone with hands on experience the differences. The xti talks about the dust cleaning sensor. Is the XT hard to clean? Will the XTI have mechanical problems longterm? At what point will the extra megapixals make a difference?
    The XT is not hard to clean, at least not any more than e digital cameras out there. To clean a sensor one must use the proper cleaning kit, and a room that is free of dust and things like that. I have had my XT for over a year now, and I haven't had the need to clean the sensor.

    To avoid getting dust on the sensor:

    -Try not to replace lenses in dusty environments where there is air movement.
    -Remove the lens keeping the camera pointing toward the ground, and rapidly install the other lens. Install the lens caps on the lens you have removed, but remove any dust from the lens using a clean lens brush.
    -Before coupling a lens to the camera, inspect the lens mount area for any traces of dust, and remove it with the brush.
    -Never leave the camera with the lens removed, unless you can install on the camera the cap that came on the camera when you purchased it.
    -------
    That said, the XTi has a few advantages over the XT, at least more pixels, and self-cleaning sensor. Regardless of which Canon camera you buy today, its price will drop to nearly one-half by next year. For example, I paid a little over $800.00 for my XT, and when the XTi was brought to the market, my XT dropped to $500.00.

    Most of the expense is not the camera body, but the lenses you will need for it. Good quality lenses hardly lose their value, but that's not the case with most cameras.

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    Here's a couple articles on cleaning digital sensors. http://www.bobatkins.com/photography...nsorclean.html

    It's really not difficult to do, and unless you are a real klutz there isn't a whole lot you can do wrong. (Although some people have.) I generally use a small nylon artist's brush I bought for less than $10. Nylon bristles are the key, as you can introduce a static charge to them quite easily, and it is the static charge that more readily attracts the dust. The wet method that is described in this article is used as a last resort for me.

    Canon's self cleaning system is probably about as good as anyone's. Which means that it is not all that good, and will need some manual assistance if you are anal about a clean sensor. It is better than not having a self cleaning system in place, but since manual cleaning is easy, and you will occasionally have to do it anyway, it's not worth a lot to me. Generally the dust has to be pretty bad to show up in the average photo.

    You test for it by setting your lens to f/22 and way out of focus. Point it at a blank surface and shoot. Then examine the image at 100% resolution on your computer monitor. You will almost always find some dust particles if you scan the whole area, but this is a pretty severe testing method that seldom is duplicated in real pictures.

    The 10MP XTi has 25% more area resolution than the 8MP XT. That *potentially* gives it 12.5% more linear (real) resolution. But once you get past 6MP or so, final resolution has more to do with the lens than the sensor. Also, a 12% increase in resolution is almost undetectable in prints. We're really just splitting hairs here. Comparing the 10MP images from an XTi to the 8MP images from a 20D/30D shows no real improvement except that the 20D/30D has cleaner high ISO detail. The small step up in sensor pixels has more to do with sales than photography.

    As far as durability goes they are all pretty good. Canon has never quoted a MTBF for a Digital Rebel shutter, but it is guessed to be in the 50,000 to 60,000 area. The 30D (and the just announced 40D)) is rated at 100,000 actuations. Replacing the shutter is a $200-300 repair bill, so it's not the end of the camera anyway. There is nothing else in there that generally wears out, except perhaps the mirror assembly. Still, 50,000 pictures will generally suffice for most people.

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