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Thread: Lightest rounds used for big game

  1. #41
    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patsfan54 View Post
    Apparently even a pellet gun CAN take down a moose, with a well (or not so well, in this case) placed shot.

    "According to a report filed with the Kenai District Court, at about 11:30 p.m. July 16, Rice used a Beeman Model R9 pellet gun — a .177-caliber firearm that shoots at approximately 1,700 feet per second"

    "After shooting the moose it ran a few yards, fell down and died."

    https://redoubtreporter.wordpress.co...e-moose-death/
    I think this was on that natgeo show Alaska state troopers.

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  2. #42
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    I started my boys off with .30-06 with 125 gr. Dropped a blackie in it's tracks at 90 yds and a fork moose at 100 yds. Worked great with not much recoil.

  3. #43
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tyrex13 View Post
    What are your personal experiences using the likes of .223, .243 or similar on caribou and moose? Mathematically, a properly constructed bullet in .223 should be adequate for deer and caribou. I know a guy that starts his kids off with .243 for moose. Reason for asking is I'm starting to think about graduating my 8 year old son from his .22 into a high powered rifle and thinking about getting him started with hunting.
    Whatever you decide, when you're out shooting, try to see if your boy might be flinching. One good way to find out is to hand him his rifle to shoot with an empty chamber. Look at him closely as he squeezes the trigger and you should be able to tell. I'd make sure you look for this early on because sometimes it can be hard to break a flinch in a young child after it's developed. Most boys will want to please their fathers with their shooting and may not always want to tell them that the recoil is a bit much.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  4. #44
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    They do make the reduced recoil rounds in 7mm-08. That's the round I've started my nephews out with at the range, then simply changed to the standard power rounds in the field. That will be my same approach with my son next year as he turns 10.
    That's what I started my son out with for his first rifle/caliber a few years ago when he was 11. I went with the same thought process as you Brian, reduced recoil at the range and standard rounds in the field. He just killed a big cow moose with it two days ago with one shot. That 7mm–08 is a great starter round and should be able to easily do the job on pretty much everything up here, exception maybe being BB.


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  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    They do make the reduced recoil rounds in 7mm-08. That's the round I've started my nephews out with at the range, then simply changed to the standard power rounds in the field. That will be my same approach with my son next year as he turns 10.
    The kid is turning TEN! I guess I always think of him as the little peanut in your avatar.....

    Now I've got one that size....I can't wait til he can come along.

    As to the matter at hand, I am far from a kid, but I dislike recoil like one. I very much enjoy my 308 and 300 savage and 30-30. You can load em lite, or load em hot and put big pills in them. I know the 243 gets lots of play as a giant slayer, but bigger slower bullets just have a way of putting really deadly holes in what you are shooting at and I really like having two holes.

  6. #46
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    I shot a bou with a 55 grain bullet out of a .223 AR platform this year. Took out the lungs. Didn't go far at all. Shot distance was less than 100 yards. My wife shoots and loves her 270. This year one well placed 130 grain bullet at 323 yards and it was done.

  7. #47
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    The kid is turning TEN! I guess I always think of him as the little peanut in your avatar.....
    Ha! Tell me about it. Time hurries on, for sure. I suppose it's past time to update my avatar, but I like being reminded of not-so-long ago.

  8. #48
    Member Toddler's Avatar
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    I am also a fan of the 6.5 caliber bullets. However, I don't have a Creedmore. All of my kids started on the 6.5X55 Sweed. The great thing about the 6.5 is its sectional density (SD) is so high. a 140 grin bullet at 264 cal drives deep/through, and the Sweed has very manageable recoil for even the youngest shooters. I like it because ammo is readily savable here in ANC in both high end ammo (Barns TSX) inexpensive ammo (Core-Lokt's). I agree with Jake on this one ... it boils down to the Ford or Chevy argument. Pick a rifle that he/she likes and make it his/hers. Them memories you will make with your kid will be what is treasured by both of your a lifetime.
    Normal people believe that if something ain't broke, don't fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet.

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