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Thread: Lost a 34' landing craft off Montigue last night

  1. #1

    Default Lost a 34' landing craft off Montigue last night

    I was doing an overnighter last night in Resurection bay and at 4:30 AM heard the coast guard discussion with a boat named Sound Adventure (not sure of the last part of the name). They were taking on water and had to abandon the vessel. I assume the vessel sank and the 2 people on board took some kayaks to shore. They were in the north western part of Montigue maybe Hanning Bay Area. They were picked up about 8 AM by another fishing vessel in the area. I was wondering if anyone had any more info.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    I heard it on the radio today and the only thing I can add is that there were a couple dogs too and they were choppered out. I wanna say that I thought there were more than 2 people but don't remember for sure.....
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    If anyone learns more about what caused the leak please post the info as it may help one of us avoid the same thing.

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    That would suck. At least no one died.

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    If I had to guess they also had problems with bilge pumps/electrical system.

    When was the last time anybody tested the bilge pump? Not just turning it on but removing the water from the boat? How else would you know if the pump is pumping the water out of the boat?

    It's something a person might want to add to the to-do-list when winterizing the boat. If there is a problem you will have all winter to fix it or forget about it until next summer.

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    Probably this one -
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    Check pumps every time on, morning, night


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    Nice looking boat, shame to lose her, luckily everyone was ok.

    One advantage of a boat you know has a leak or is non-self bailing, you always check the pumps and see the water moving out. Sometimes when you flip the switch, the pump will spin and sound like its running but that doesn't necessarily mean that it will pump water. With a perfect hull it's hard to test unless you purposefully dump water in, to watch it go out. Having a back up pump with alligator clips or some quick way to connect is a good idea. My new to me boat supposedly has a sealed hull, don't trust it, no way to check it, if you have a leak you may not know until it may be too late, will be adding some access and a way to pump out if necessary.

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    If I had to guess they also had problems with bilge pumps/electrical system.

    When was the last time anybody tested the bilge pump? Not just turning it on but removing the water from the boat? How else would you know if the pump is pumping the water out of the boat?

    It's something a person might want to add to the to-do-list when winterizing the boat. If there is a problem you will have all winter to fix it or forget about it until next summer.
    Living in Valdez you always know your bilge pumps are working with the rain we have. Reach down and there is usually a lever on it to manually trip the float to check too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BQuad View Post
    Nice looking boat, shame to lose her, luckily everyone was ok.

    One advantage of a boat you know has a leak or is non-self bailing, you always check the pumps and see the water moving out. Sometimes when you flip the switch, the pump will spin and sound like its running but that doesn't necessarily mean that it will pump water. With a perfect hull it's hard to test unless you purposefully dump water in, to watch it go out. Having a back up pump with alligator clips or some quick way to connect is a good idea. My new to me boat supposedly has a sealed hull, don't trust it, no way to check it, if you have a leak you may not know until it may be too late, will be adding some access and a way to pump out if necessary.

    You certainly have some interesting problems to overcome. With out knowing more about your boat.
    I don't like making any suggestions because it never helpful. If nothing it will give you something to think about.

    There are so many reasons I do not like the idea of trying to add a 2nd pump when the boat is sinking. I would prefer having a 2nd bilge pump already wired and having it own plumbing with the switch label “EMERGENCY BILGE PUMP”.

    Also, There are alarm systems that will alert you if there is water in the bilge or sealed hull, you might want too look into.

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    I have two bilge pumps. One is wired so that no matter what, battery switch turned off or not, it will always pump. It has a manual and automatic setting. The second, is a three-way (on, off, auto) Both are left on auto. When I start to go up on step, I turn the back one on for about 1-2 minutes. That takes care of any issues. The rear one is powerful enough that it looks like a garden hose on full when it pumps. Don't know the GPH but it is good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    I have two bilge pumps. One is wired so that no matter what, battery switch turned off or not, it will always pump. It has a manual and automatic setting. The second, is a three-way (on, off, auto) Both are left on auto. When I start to go up on step, I turn the back one on for about 1-2 minutes. That takes care of any issues. The rear one is powerful enough that it looks like a garden hose on full when it pumps. Don't know the GPH but it is good.
    I have the three way switch as well and the switch lights up red when activated in either position so I know if there I water in the bilge
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  14. #14

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    On a skiff that big it's crazy not to have something like this:

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01G4VU0YE..._t1_B009E7WG6G

    The downside of outboard power; no engine driven bilge pump. There is all kinds of them available and they weigh nothing and are amazingly low cost. Most of them are around 30GPM, which exceeds or is equal to your average Rule. Would really be interested in the specifics of what happened.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by BQuad View Post
    Nice looking boat, shame to lose her, luckily everyone was ok.

    One advantage of a boat you know has a leak or is non-self bailing, you always check the pumps and see the water moving out. Sometimes when you flip the switch, the pump will spin and sound like its running but that doesn't necessarily mean that it will pump water. With a perfect hull it's hard to test unless you purposefully dump water in, to watch it go out. Having a back up pump with alligator clips or some quick way to connect is a good idea. My new to me boat supposedly has a sealed hull, don't trust it, no way to check it, if you have a leak you may not know until it may be too late, will be adding some access and a way to pump out if necessary.
    What is the config of your 'sealed hull' which I take to mean you have a self-bailing deck? The important thing for you is how many sealed compartments are there? On all the skiffs I build, there are multiple sealed compartments (the number determined by LOA) and every one of them except the most forward has a pump out along the centerline at the aft most of the chamber. A single chamber below decks is a very bad config unless it is filled with foam blocks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by copperlake View Post
    On a skiff that big it's crazy not to have something like this:

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01G4VU0YE..._t1_B009E7WG6G

    The downside of outboard power; no engine driven bilge pump. There is all kinds of them available and they weigh nothing and are amazingly low cost. Most of them are around 30GPM, which exceeds or is equal to your average Rule. Would really be interested in the specifics of what happened.
    I bet those gas powered pumps don't lose anyhere near as much flow from head pressure as the 12volt pumps do.

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    mine is only 27' and i have 4 1100 pumps and yeah i gather water due to the large roof and deck drains to the bilge. i also have a honda 4 stroke wx 10 just in case. i also will take steves advise and add a raw water pick up into the bilge just for fun. sure want a post event rundown.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimw View Post
    I have the three way switch as well and the switch lights up red when activated in either position so I know if there I water in the bilge
    I also have a 3 way switch and 2 pumps with 2 external float switches.
    The secondary float switch is a couple of inches higher than the main one.
    If the main float switch or pump fails the second switch will turn on the back up pump and sound an alarm so I know the main is out.
    I also have it wired so that both pumps come on in manual mode.

  20. #20

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    Appreciate the thoughts Macgyver, I'm definitely not skimping on bilge pumps, will be adding them. One item I added and loved on my last boat was a bilge counter. Unless you are drifting or at anchor, it's hard to hear that bilge pump kick on, the counter will let you know without beeping all the time, nice for a non-self bailing boat. Last boat I installed 3 pumps, all with manual and float switches, one forward for the open front deck, and a low (main bilge pump with counter) and a high water pump (with alarm) aft. Was really comfortable with that setup, and two pumps were never needed. Wiring direct at least one pump direct to the battery is good, assuming you have another battery to start the engines if it gets drained, a friend got close to losing a boat when he switched off the batteries (and bilge pump) and camped ashore.

    Quote Originally Posted by copperlake View Post
    What is the config of your 'sealed hull' which I take to mean you have a self-bailing deck? The important thing for you is how many sealed compartments are there?
    Completely self bailing with scuppers with a fair amount of free board, rear scuppers for the aft fishing deck are threaded and could be plugged if desired. A total of 5 chambers, port and starboard out by the gunwales, fore and aft down the center, and the outboard bracket is also a separate chamber. The aft chamber is not completely sealed as there are access panels and passages for fuel hoses, fuel tank, and battery cables. That chamber will definitely be getting at least one bilge pump with manual and auto switches. Each chamber has a threaded plug which can be removed for inspection/draining when out of the water.

    By pump out do you mean a threaded plug or access hatch? Theoretically, if the chamber is sealed and is damaged from below, the air in the chamber should hold a large amount of water out, but some way to access would be nice in case you ever are concerned water has entered a chamber, on the other hand if you open a sealed chamber with a hole in the bottom, more water would start coming in. It is a conundrum. The boat was in a slip in Sitka for 13 years with no bilge pumps so I know there is no water getting into the hull from leaks or rainfall, just not comfortable having a boat without a bilge pump.

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