Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Just curious

  1. #1

    Default Just curious

    Just wondering how many forum members remember how wonderful july's on the kenai used to be before the chaotic dipnet fisheries we're started. Those were the good old days and boy do I miss them..

  2. #2
    Member theultrarider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    1,039

    Default

    Yes sir. Or going out and catching kings before work every morning only to release them. 50-70 pound fish every morning. The silvers.... And actually enjoy it.

  3. #3
    Member cod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Ak.
    Posts
    2,136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gunner View Post
    Just wondering how many forum members remember how wonderful july's on the kenai used to be before the chaotic dipnet fisheries we're started. Those were the good old days and boy do I miss them..
    Boy, Howdy!!
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  4. #4
    Member tccak71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,167

    Default

    Yeah, I remember the chaotic sport fishery on the Russian and Kenai. You can have the Kenai, and I'll continue to only go there to dip net. I hope everyone and their brother continues to fish there (sport, personal use, whatever) so they don't ruin & overrun other areas. Kenai is a lost cause, I just hope the diesease doesn't spread. lol.

  5. #5
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,761

    Default

    For me it's all about attitude. No matter who you are, THESE are someone's "good old days". It's like that in every generation, I suppose. I have some great memories of fishing the Russian during the 1980s and 1990s. I didn't fish the main Kenai River much for kings, but I did have a few memorable trips below Soldotna. My wife caught her biggest king there, a 54-pounder that she's never let me forget.

    More recently I've really enjoyed dipneting in the lower river, and I have some great memories of that, including this year.

    If a person can't learn to embrace change, I think they're going to be pretty miserable over the years. Change is both unstoppable and constant. Live in the moment; it's all any of us have.

    Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eagle River, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    621

    Default

    For me the biggest change is just the number of people participating. 20+ years ago you could still find your own spot on public land, but today there always seems to be someone on the other side of the tree. What is strange is that the numbers of license sold does not support the increased pressure. It is apparently just a case of concentrating the users into a smaller and smaller area. Used to fish Bings...then it became crowded. Used to fish Willow....then the crowds came and the fish are gone. Used to be you would see 5-10 tents on the north beach during dipnet season, and even on the weekends you could have 20-30 feet of bank to yourself, now there is a tent city and fishing is like hot bunking, you step out and two step in.

    Everything changes, but as Mike mentioned, today is someone's good old days, and watching my 8yo pulling a net, whacking fish or even catching one with his bare hands....well someday I'll look back and realize that it was still great even in 2017.

  7. #7
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska - I wasn't born here, but I got here as soon as I could!
    Posts
    3,257

    Default

    Constant change is here to stay

  8. #8

    Default

    An estimated 160-180 thousand sport fishers participate in the various upper cook inlet salmon fisheries. Hard to totally escape that kind of crowd.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •