Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: Flounder Fillets

  1. #1
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eagle River (Home!)
    Posts
    1,281

    Default Flounder Fillets

    Does one fillet a flounder like a Halibut? Seen a guy chop one up like drawing a cross on top of the fish... Heard they are decent to eat if prepared correctly.

    Thanks

  2. #2

    Default

    Yeah, just a lot smaller. Make sure to bleed the gills after you catch it, this will help it taste a lot better and you'll get nice white fillets.

  3. #3
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Big Lake Alaska
    Posts
    1,934

    Default

    I caught 2 of those saber tooth pieces of*edited*. My fishing partner (my wife) wanted to see what they taste like, so I fillet them just like a halibut, after I got the scales off my knife! I told her not to mix the junk up with our halibut.

    I haven't tried it yet, but I think I would rather use it as halibut bait!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    5,174

    Default

    Last year when I was dipping, somebody caught a flounder and left it on the beach. I hate to see fish wasted, so I put it on my tag and took it home. Filleted it and battered the chunks. Taste wise it wasn't that bad, but the texture was mushy. Don't know if a fish bled and iced immediately would fare any better, as I've heard they flesh is generally mushy.

  5. #5

    Default

    We just cooked one last night, battered it in some bread crumbs and pan fried... was actually really good, not mushy or anything

  6. #6
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eagle River (Home!)
    Posts
    1,281

    Default

    I've read that you can catch them from the Shore in or near Homer. Anyone have any comments on shore fishing for Flounders?

  7. #7
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Big Lake Alaska
    Posts
    1,934

    Default

    Snaggle toothed halibut bait! They are ugly!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    um... Wasilla...
    Posts
    814

    Default

    Just remember... there is a BIG difference between arrowtooth flounder and other flounder. Arrowtooth is the one that gets mushy.
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you canít tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

  9. #9
    Mark
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rod in Wasilla View Post
    Just remember... there is a BIG difference between arrowtooth flounder and other flounder. Arrowtooth is the one that gets mushy.
    Yeah, it's "arrowtooth", not "snaggle tooth".

    When I was first told that the arrowtooth flounder I caught was no good and would turn to mush, I thought the charter skipper was another of those who didn't know what good fish was all about.

    Like they say, we all live and learn...........

    All the other flounder I've caught in Alaska and California are outstanding. The arrowtooth is a freak of nature..........

  10. #10

    Default

    is the arrow tooth the one people catch while dipping in keani? with the stripes on its side

  11. #11

    Default several types of fish talked about

    From reading this thread, I think different people are talking about at least three species of fish. What I've seen dipped on the Kenai or Kasilof are starry flounder - rough, almost sharp scales with yellow and black striped fins. I've seen plenty of their carcasses left after being filleted, so folks are eating them. The arrowtooth flounder is sometimes caught while halibut fishing, and most people who comment on having eaten them don't like them. Off of the Homer spit you can catch bunches of yellowfin sole, which are quite edible. I've heard there are rock sole there, as well, which are supposed to be very good eating.
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

  12. #12
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Big Lake Alaska
    Posts
    1,934

    Default Still UGLY!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    Yeah, it's "arrowtooth", not "snaggle tooth". The arrowtooth is a freak of nature..........


    Pointy beaks and lots of teeth......arrowtooth...AKA snaggle tooth!

    And I would have to agree a freak of nature! Don't take the hook out with your fingers.......you might find one missing.


    Maybe when the wife decides to cook the two I got, I can come over to one of this forum memberís house and have liver and onions!!!!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  13. #13
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eagle River (Home!)
    Posts
    1,281

    Default

    How would one (or can one) go about shore casting for the yellowfin sole? I read that they are easy to catch but having not ever seen someone do it I figure that is just writting that sells books or the fish are not very tasty. ?

    Thanks

  14. #14

    Default yellowfin sole

    The sole off the end of the Homer spit seem to congregate between the shore and the large metal pylons off the last dock there, just east of Land's End hotel. You can catch them on just about anything: bait, small rubber jigs, metal jigs...I've even caught them on vibrax spinners. In this particular area, they are abundant and really pretty easy to catch. I like to use power pro line so I can cast a smaller jig way out there. If you get out by the pylons you catch a lot of sculpin and some pollock and cod, too. Unfortunately, the pollock and cod I've caught were swarming with worms. The sole seem pretty free of them. Bait fishermen haul them in by the bucketful at times.
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Anchorage AK.
    Posts
    779

    Default starry flounder

    try the mouthes of the anchor, deep creek. in the lowwer tidal area. use a small single egg as you would for a trout. they will eat almost anything. And yes fresh they are a treat, they just don't freeze worth a darned.

  16. #16
    Member barleydog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    92

    Default

    Arrowtooth (AKA Sabertoothes), are aweful! Like the other gents stated.... MUSHY! It's like eating fish flavored mash potatoes. I have eaten starry flounder (black and white alternating fin pattern), caught off shore in the winter. Not a bad fish provided the fish is bled and iced. Cut them into strips, cook them hot with a crispy coating.

  17. #17
    Member CanCanCase's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bandon, OR
    Posts
    614

    Default

    Jerked an arrowtooth up from 1100 feet today while fishing for black cod. My clients already knew it wasn't good to eat, so they asked me to toss it. First one I've seen around here, but it's also the first time I've fished that deep this close to Juneau...

    -Case
    M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  18. #18
    Member CanCanCase's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bandon, OR
    Posts
    614

    Default

    Does anyone have a good "flatfish ID guide"? What about all the turbot?

    While not technically a flat-fish, we were talking about skates the other day... does anyone keep them, or are they another scrap fish? I used to eat rays in the tropics all the time... a round cookie cutter (sharpened) takes a nice circular piece out of the wing and cooks up just like a scallop....

    -Case
    M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  19. #19

    Default

    As far as flatfish goes these are the ones I know of

    - Starry flounder, Small to medium size halibut looking fish with sandpaper skin and yellow and black alternating stripes.(Taste good)

    Arrowtooth flounder- Small size, taste horrible, look like mini halibut, sharp teeth.

    Rock sole- Small, caught incidentally and rarely off homer spit, taste very good(from what i hear)

    Yellowfin sole- Very good eating, caught off of homer spit, small to med size.




    PICTURES.

    Yellowfin sole-





    Rock sole-



    Starry flounder-



    Arrowtooth flounder-

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Anchorage AK.
    Posts
    779

    Default skate

    Quote Originally Posted by CanCanCase View Post
    Does anyone have a good "flatfish ID guide"? What about all the turbot?

    While not technically a flat-fish, we were talking about skates the other day... does anyone keep them, or are they another scrap fish? I used to eat rays in the tropics all the time... a round cookie cutter (sharpened) takes a nice circular piece out of the wing and cooks up just like a scallop....

    -Case
    I tried the "cookie cutter" job on a cook inlet skate several years ago.
    boiled some, sauted' some in butter, butter & garlic, then tried to deep fry some, no matter how I cooked them the closest resembelance i can think of would be SOFT FISHY MUD.
    I know some people like them, but you can certainly have mine!

    Quite possible that I need to take cooking classes

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •