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Thread: New Scattergun?

  1. #1
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Default New Scattergun?

    Been kicking around the idea of a new shotgun for ducks. I haven't kept up so don't know what's the latest rave or what's crap. Doesn't have to be fancy, just wanting a reliable semi that won't necessarily break the bank. Maybe with your input I can narrow it down to the top three contenders. Thanks...

    Oh and what do you guys hear about CZ shotguns....any good?
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    I've got about 4 years on my beretta A400 and love it. Your welcome to take it for a run if you want. My dad has 3 years on his tristar and has had very good luck with that one and it's about a third the cost.

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    Same experience as Tony with my a400. Has reliably cycled any shells from trap to 3-1/2 goose loads, slugs, buck, etc. Down to 0 degrees f on the Kenai in october. Used can find a decent price on one and you'll soon be wishing you had gotten one sooner.

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    I guess I'll have to check one out. One thing I do know though is that I don't particularly care for is a heavy shotgun. A year or so ago I was in Sportsman's with my son and was looking at shotguns. The one thing I seem to notice was the weight of a lot of these guns. I was pretty much brought up on lightweight Brownings, and still use my 30+ year old B-80. At that time, I can't remember if it was the Browning Gold I picked up or some other, but you couldn't help notice how light it was compared to the others. I know I'm old school, but I can't help loving how a lightweight shotgun swings, points, and feels. But then of course I used to hunt a lot of upland birds too. I guess I'll just have to do some research....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Check out a franchi affinity they feel nice and light and slim, I have not used one myself but I thought it felt good

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    If you are set on an auto loader I would throw my vote in with the Beretta crowd. I have an extrema have had really good luck with it. If you are willing to consider something other than an auto loader I would recommend the Browning Cynergy waterfowl edition. I bought one a few years ago and my extrema doesn't see the duck blind much any more. The OU is much shorter and lighter and points better for me. Some will knock the OU's because they don't have a third shot, but it hasn't bothered me. I simply enjoy shooting and carrying it enough that it makes up for it. Plus having two separate chokes in the same gun is worth sacrificing the third shot for me.

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    Im' running a Browning Maxus, and love it. Its a little more then the Beretta A400, but its been great. Shot trap, shot 3" and 3.5" loads out of it. Hopefully this year in Fairbanks I'll have more time to use it then I did this last season, but so far it has been a great gun!

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catchfish View Post
    Check out a franchi affinity they feel nice and light and slim, I have not used one myself but I thought it felt good
    Doing a little research and see that Franchi is a full pound lighter than the A400. Not a bad price either. I've heard good things about Franchi shotguns for a very long time.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoss View Post
    . Some will knock the OU's because they don't have a third shot, but it hasn't bothered me. I simply enjoy shooting and carrying it enough that it makes up for it. Plus having two separate chokes in the same gun is worth sacrificing the third shot for me.
    That makes a lot of sense..... Always liked the looks of the OU but usually they ain't cheap.....lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    That makes a lot of sense..... Always liked the looks of the OU but usually they ain't cheap.....lol
    You are correct. Good OU's are not cheap, and most cheap OU's are not good. Tristar makes a waterfowl OU and I bought one of those before I got the cynergy because I did not want to spend the money on the cynergy. The Tristar OU was absolute junk, at first it was OK but not great, then it would double fire about once every other trip out after it got some use on it. I have always been a wingshooter and never noticed recoil on a shot gun, when two 3 or 3 1/2 inchers went off at the same time in the tristar I assure you I noticed that recoil. I traded the tristar back in before the season was over on the cynergy. They are not cheap but in my opinion they are worth it, get a decent one and you cannot make it malfunction even if you try. Plus my cynergy is a good 6-7 inches shorter than my extrema and they both have 28 inch barrels because the entire action is basically omitted from the gun. Although this gun works for me I think a lot of it has to do with how it fits me too. When buying a shot gun I would pay more attention to how it feels in your hands, how it shoulders, points and swings than anything else. If you are constantly trying to correct a fit issue you will never shoot as well with it and will never like it as much as do another gun that fits you.

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    Member mtncowboy's Avatar
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    Easter Sunday was spent burning through a few boxes of clays and we had a Benelli Vinci, M2, Montifeltro, Franchi O/U, Beretta 391, Browning Cynergy, and a Remington 870. I enjoyed shooting all of them, but at the end of the day, I my old 870 killed more clays for me than anything else. Not to say that you shouldn't get a new shotgun, because we all love playing with new guns, but I have bought and sold several different fancy semi-autos because at the end of the day I still brought home more birds with my old 870. My next scattergun will be a Winchester SX3. I would also like a Beretta. Have fun and let us know what you decide. PS the Cynergy is mine and it has been a fantastic gun, I had a friend with a tristar o/u and it didn't make it through one shoot before it pooped out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoss View Post
    When buying a shot gun I would pay more attention to how it feels in your hands, how it shoulders, points and swings than anything else.
    I would have to agree. That's why I said I've always liked a lighter, well balanced shotgun....just seems to help point and swing better.

    I must say though that if and when I get a new scattergun it will probably be another semi. A buddy of mine bought a new Benelli "Ethos" last summer. I loved the way it felt in the hands. Reminded me of my old B-80. Yesterday we were talking about it and he mentioned the inertia driven system which is new to me so I did some reading up on it. Sounds like it's been getting some pretty high praise. Lots to be said about keeping dirty gasses in the barrel rather than all over the inside of the gun. Keeping a semi clean has always seemed to be a pretty big issue. What pros and cons have you guys heard about the inertia driven system?

    I'm really liking this.....check it out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lUWXOxVzVo
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    I owned an Benelli SBE before my extrema and I really like the way it handled, but I had trouble with it jamming. In my experience most jams in an autoloader come when the action fails to fully chamber the next round. In my opinion the spring that slams the new shell home is just to light in most semi autos. I believe that is why I have had such good luck with the extrema and why it has never jammed on me. Just pull the action back by hand on both guns and you can feel the difference. If Benelli would use a little stouter spring to prevent the jam when loading the next shell I would probably own one of those instead of the Beretta since I like you prefer the light weight feel and fit of the benelli.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoss View Post
    I owned an Benelli SBE before my extrema and I really like the way it handled, but I had trouble with it jamming. In my experience most jams in an autoloader come when the action fails to fully chamber the next round. In my opinion the spring that slams the new shell home is just to light in most semi autos.
    In the video I posted above, at around the 4:34 he shows the action movement. Do you think they may have addressed this with the SBE3?
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    In the video I posted above, at around the 4:34 he shows the action movement. Do you think they may have addressed this with the SBE3?
    I honestly don't know. I owned the original SBE when they came out. Almost all of the jams I experienced were because the longer shells were not pushed all of the way into the barrel (mostly when shooting 3 1/2's) or with the shorter shells the bolt did not rotate all of the way over like you can see it doing in the video you posted. Basically the chamber would close looking as though it had cycled, but it would not fire because the bolt had not rotated all of the way over. I have never shot or handled an SBE3 so I really can't say if that issue has been fixed or not, if it has the SBE3 would be pretty hard to beat in my opinion. If you go into a gun shop and handle both the SBE and the Berretta you should be able to tell if it has been fixed or not. As the bolt tension difference was very noticeable between the two when I owned the SBE. You could feel the difference when pulling it back and you could hear the difference when you locked the bolt and the released it to close as the Berretta really slammed shut.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoss View Post
    If you go into a gun shop and handle both the SBE and the Berretta you should be able to tell if it has been fixed or not. As the bolt tension difference was very noticeable between the two when I owned the SBE. You could feel the difference when pulling it back and you could hear the difference when you locked the bolt and the released it to close as the Berretta really slammed shut.
    Ok thanks.....I'll try and remember that. He did say though that the only problem he had after shooting a couple hundred rounds and then going on the pheasant hunt, that the only cycling problem was with a couple of the REAL light loads......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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