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Thread: Looking for some info on Crow Pass

  1. #1
    Member Down Range's Avatar
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    Apr 2008
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    Default Looking for some info on Crow Pass

    Can anybody give some insight on Crow pass trail?

    How much time I should alot?
    What should I take?
    Hazards?
    What is the best time to go?
    Tactics for crossing the river?

    Down Range Out!

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Sep 2005
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    Eagle River, AK
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    Time - Totally depends on your priorities. I've done it in everything from a day to six days. I personally think that two days is the worst option, as you need to carry overnight gear but you're moving too fast to really enjoy the place. I like taking 3-4 days so that I can spend more time exploring than just moving down the trail. My favorite option is staying more than one night in a specific spot and using the off day(s) to explore areas that rarely see visitors.

    Take - Basic camping/hiking gear lists can be found elsewhere on the site. Be ready to be wet, stung by wasps, and to run into bears.

    Hazards - You'll be crossing a number of very steep snow slides on the first day. It is quite common to step on wasp nests right in the middle of the trail. Bears and moose are commonly encountered at very close range. Hypothermia risk should be taken seriously when wet and cold.

    Best time - Earlier has more snow up high, but the trail is more clear and the wasps are less of an issue. Later has less snow, but the trail can become overgrown up high and cow parsnip is a issue for those allergic to it.

    River - It's generally not a big deal. If you're with others, link arms and move slowly. Keep the waist buckle of your pack unstrapped in case you fall and need to ditch your pack. Cross between the marked spots and you'll be fine.

  3. #3
    Member SteveAK's Avatar
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    Oct 2013
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    Anchorage
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    I haven't done it yet, on bucket list, but attended a talk at the Eagle River Nature Center last year. Here are a couple of resources:

    http://dnr.alaska.gov/Assets/uploads...s/crowpass.pdf

    http://www.ernc.org/trails/crow-pass

    If you have a chance, attend the trail talk.

  4. #4
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    Nov 2009
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    Palmer, Alaska
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    I did it two years ago with my younger brother. July 31-August 1. Nice sunny days both days, except for a light 15 minute rain just after we set up our tent. We slept at the second bridge over Raven Creek from the Girdwood to Eagle River direction. There are two obvious tent spots there, one on one side of the bridge, and one on the other. They aren't marked on the map, but again, they are obviously perfect tent setup spots. There aren't any trees nearby to hang a bag in a tree for your food from bears, so we hung our food bag from the bridge, *no* bear could get it how we hung it, but perhaps a squirrel...

    The second day we travelled along the trail, very well marked, just overgrown a ton with tall grasses. They were damp from rain we never encountered where we camped. We must have changed our socks at least a couple times in 4 miles from being soaked. The spot for crossing the river is well marked, follow the directions, do it in the morning before it flows higher, etc. and you should be fine. It is extremely cold however. Even with alternate footwear and hiking pants my feet and legs were numb, except for above my knees. I basically had no way of knowing when my feet were touching the riverbed except for the tension I could feel in my muscles between knees and hip. After crossing we had lunch on the Eagle River (town) side of the Eagle River. We dried out extremely quickly, and had no need for any clothing changes except for putting back on socks and boots.

    At the end, I wish I had packed less clothing and more food, and had a pair of trekking poles as well. Even if it were to have rained (even a lot), I believe as long as you have a very nice pair of quick dry hiking pants, one set is enough. If you are going through somewhere that's wet or it's raining, your pants will be wet. There's just no getting around that. As soon as it's dry, in a jiffy, they're dry!
    First photo of me at bridge where we camped, second photo of my brother after crossing river.
    IMG_1591.jpgIMG_1598.jpg

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