Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 45

Thread: TTC Salt Substitute- where is it?

  1. #1
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Default TTC Salt Substitute- where is it?

    Hi folks,

    I just received a PM from a forum reader who was looking for the TTC salt substitute Cabelas is / was selling. I looked all over their site and can no longer find it. Anybody out there have a source for this stuff?

    Also, I am interested in taxidermist's opinions on it. I've never used it, have been leery of recommending it as a result, and have not really made up my mind whether I should dump my salt and put all my eggs in the TTC basket. So... what's your take on it? I'm looking for folks who have actual hands-on experience with the product, preferably with several critters in various temperature situations. Does it work as advertised? Would you use it again?

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  2. #2

    Default

    I know Marc Taylor has it on the shelf at Wiggy's.

    I spoke with my good friend, Rich Hamilton, on the phone about this the other day. For those of you who don't know, Rich operates Browtine Taxidermy in North Pole and is probably "the" best taxidermist in the state.

    Rich isn't sold on the stuff yet. He has had a few capes come in where the customers used TTC. He explained to me when the capes come in treated with TTC they are very difficult to work. Rich is meticulous about ensuring the capes are correctly fleshed before they go off to the tannery. He spoke of a moose or a caribou (memory fails me) he was fleshing. He cut off a nice size piece of tissue and noticed water just oozing out.

    Long story short he has too many doubts about this product at this time. I was really close to purchasing from Marc, but will instead stick with the salt...a product known to work.

    My recommendation would be for hunters to consult "their" taxidermists before applying TTC to their trophies.

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    15

    Default My TTC opinion

    For what it is worth....

    I have used it on
    2 Brown Bears
    1 Black Bear
    1 Moose
    3 Dall Sheep
    2 Goats
    2 Wolves
    3 Coyotes
    4 Fox
    1 Blacktail
    2 Iowa Whitetails
    1 Meat stealing little ***** of an Ermine. (oooooooo it still pisses me off)

    The hides that were sent out to the Tannery came back very nice.
    One Goat went to the Tannery the other to the Taxidermist, both came back fantastic. One Brown Bear went to the Tannery, the other to the Taxidermist, both are flawless. The Coys are in the freezer as is the little meat eating ***** of an Ermine. I have sent stuff to a local taxidermist and one back in AZ, zero issues. The sheep dried out more so than I imagined possible, kinda worried me at first. My Taxi said they were " Drier than a popcorn fart" but each came back in excellent condition. I have had zero negative things to report and I have used it quite a bit. The Taxidermist's I use are top-shelf, long-standing professionals who have been creating artwork for over 80 yrs between them.

    I have used the TTC in conditions ranging from roasting my butt off on a sheep hunt in Aug, then freezing it off the following year in the same spot. I have used it in the never ending rains of Kodiak and Prince of Wales to the rain like hell, sun come out and bake you in the next ten minutes of the AK Peninsula. Of course when it's rainy you may need to reapply a little here and there, but if you can get the TTC on there in a brief respite from the rains, very rarely have I ever needed to reapply to finish drying out the exposed flesh.

    The above member (Jimmy Urban) mentioned "He cut off a nice size piece of tissue and noticed water just oozing out." Well, it wouldn't matter if you were using salt or TTC, either one will only penetrate just so much tissue. If you take your time and flesh your critters like you are supposed to, either TTC or salt will do what they are supposed, you just need alot less of the TTC to make things right. I have found absolutely no reason to go back to salt again.

    Wait, there is one thing about TTC that isn't good, it sucks as a seasoning.

    There...see...there is something for the critics to dislike.

    Again...my .02 for what it's worth

    Good Luck in the draws everyone.

    I'll see you in the mountains.

    Todd Langford

  4. #4
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,391

    Default

    Even if it works as well as salt, what are the supposed advantages? Would this be a case of substituting one thing for it's equal, or are there aspects that would make TTC better? It seems like salt has been getting the job done pretty well for a long time.

  5. #5
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Default the main advantage

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Even if it works as well as salt, what are the supposed advantages? Would this be a case of substituting one thing for it's equal, or are there aspects that would make TTC better? It seems like salt has been getting the job done pretty well for a long time.
    Brian,

    I think the big deal with this stuff is its light weight. It is a fraction of the weight of an equal amount of salt, or so it is said.

    Duster makes a pretty powerful case for it. Hard to argue with those kinds of results, and ultimately that's the real proof.

    Those who know me know that I'm usually hesitant to endorse a product until it has proven itself. In this case I'm still a little gunshy. I'm wondering if Cabela's still carries it and if not, why not? Just wondering...

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  6. #6

    Default

    Brian 4.5 lbs of TTC will do the same as 25 lbs of salt. So if weight is an issue, like flying out in a cub it sheds the pounds big time. I cant find the stuff or I would have tried it by now. Duster told me about it a couple years ago, its hard to find it in Fbks, but they always have it at Wiggys is Anchorage.

  7. #7

    Default T.T.C. web site

    If you cant find a place locally to buy it here is the site to buy it from the company direct.
    http://www.bringmin.com/catalog/prod...roducts_id=127

  8. #8
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Default Calling Marc Taylor

    Hey Marc,

    Your name came up in this TTC thread as a source for the stuff. Do you have a website for the Wiggy's store? If so, could you post a link to it here? I see your other website for your books and such, but I'd like to see your online store if you have that yet.

    Thanks, Marc!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Duster View Post
    The above member (Jimmy Urban) mentioned "He cut off a nice size piece of tissue and noticed water just oozing out." Well, it wouldn't matter if you were using salt or TTC, either one will only penetrate just so much tissue. If you take your time and flesh your critters like you are supposed to, either TTC or salt will do what they are supposed, you just need alot less of the TTC to make things right. I have found absolutely no reason to go back to salt again.
    I agree with you in many respects. However it is the taxidermist's job to ensure the capes are properly fleshed before going to the tannery, unless of course he tans them himself. Not every hunter is as meticulous about caping as others. I believe with the above example the TTC created a hard almost non-pliable cape that appeared to be dry, but wasn't. I'm not a taxi, but I know enought that if this wasn't caught the potential for hair splipage is inevitable. If it were treated with salt, the excess meat would merely turn into an obvious gooey mess still capable of being fleshed properly...though also running the risk of hair slipage.

    I love the idea of the product...I mean who doesn't want to reduce weight? Out of respect for my taxidermist though, I'll continue to use the salt until he is convinced.

  10. #10
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,279

    Default You Ring?

    I'm "online at the store" from 11:00 to 6:00, Tuesday through Saturday.

    If I've ever steered anyone wrong, then speak up now...

    (chirping crickets)

    Okay then, trust me on this. TTC works wonders. Beyond weight savings, it pulls moisture from the hide IMMEDIATELY, and "SETS" the hair once it's done pulling moisture. Your cape/hide will appear shriveled, and it is, because the moisture was just blasted out of it.

    It'll take away any excuse that a poor taxidermist may have for returning you a slipping mount, and great taxidermists will learn to love it for the same reason; It eliminates the possibility of slippage.

    I have used it for the last three years without losing a hair. Period. And some of us (you) may consider this stuff for your own heads! Pun intended.

    _Unlike salt, you only apply it once, then forget about it.
    _You only carry it in. It will melt and dry your hide in as little as 24 hours giving you less to carry out from a pack-in hunt.
    _It does not substitute for a poor fleshing job, but PENETRATES DEEP.

    I used less than a 4lb 11oz container on my 8 1/2' bear this spring. Two days later I turned it over to the taxidermist (He's an award-winning one). He was amazed at how much moisture was pulled out in such a short period of time, and stated that it was "tanner ready".

    I buy it in bulk to keep shipping down, and therefore your price down.

    Yep, I've got it in stock - all the time - so come and get it.

    Taylor

  11. #11
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Default one more question

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Taylor View Post
    I'm "online at the store" from 11:00 to 6:00, Tuesday through Saturday.

    If I've ever steered anyone wrong, then speak up now...

    (chirping crickets)

    Okay then, trust me on this. TTC works wonders. Beyond weight savings, it pulls moisture from the hide IMMEDIATELY, and "SETS" the hair once it's done pulling moisture. Your cape/hide will appear shriveled, and it is, because the moisture was just blasted out of it.

    It'll take away any excuse that a poor taxidermist may have for returning you a slipping mount, and great taxidermists will learn to love it for the same reason; It eliminates the possibility of slippage.

    I have used it for the last three years without losing a hair. Period. And some of us (you) may consider this stuff for your own heads! Pun intended.

    _Unlike salt, you only apply it once, then forget about it.
    _You only carry it in. It will melt and dry your hide in as little as 24 hours giving you less to carry out from a pack-in hunt.
    _It does not substitute for a poor fleshing job, but PENETRATES DEEP.

    I used less than a 4lb 11oz container on my 8 1/2' bear this spring. Two days later I turned it over to the taxidermist (He's an award-winning one). He was amazed at how much moisture was pulled out in such a short period of time, and stated that it was "tanner ready".

    I buy it in bulk to keep shipping down, and therefore your price down.

    Yep, I've got it in stock - all the time - so come and get it.

    Taylor
    Marc,

    I gotta ask... will it keep MY hair from slipping? And if so, what do I do about a shriveled scalp?

    :-))

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  12. #12

    Default ttc

    Have seen it applied to 4 brown bears. Really pulls the moisture out for sure. Tanner was a little worried at first that maybe too much dehydration, but after soaking 2x, was really happy with the outcome. I used just a bit more than a 4.5 lb jug on my 9+foot brown, and the hide turned out excellent! Much less weight than a 25 lb salt bag, and less hassle. My 02 cents.

  13. #13
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eagle River (Home!)
    Posts
    1,285

    Default

    Anyone used TTC to assist in curing salmon eggs I use plain salt with some mixes before the borax die treatment?

  14. #14
    Member 1CRAZY1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Working now in Central Colorado.
    Posts
    37

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Urban View Post
    I know Marc Taylor has it on the shelf at Wiggy's.

    I spoke with my good friend, Rich Hamilton, on the phone about this the other day. For those of you who don't know, Rich operates Browtine Taxidermy in North Pole and is probably "the" best taxidermist in the state.

    Rich isn't sold on the stuff yet. He has had a few capes come in where the customers used TTC. He explained to me when the capes come in treated with TTC they are very difficult to work. Rich is meticulous about ensuring the capes are correctly fleshed before they go off to the tannery. He spoke of a moose or a caribou (memory fails me) he was fleshing. He cut off a nice size piece of tissue and noticed water just oozing out.

    Long story short he has too many doubts about this product at this time. I was really close to purchasing from Marc, but will instead stick with the salt...a product known to work.

    My recommendation would be for hunters to consult "their" taxidermists before applying TTC to their trophies.
    Not to bring up an old subject, but I think its kind of interesting that Larry Bartlett likes TTC so far and he uses Browtine for his videos. Doesnt quite add up

  15. #15
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,272

    Default

    TTC is a very good product. I used it on a 2006 Sheep hunt. For those that remember we had a ten year storm the first few weeks of Aug. I killed my Ram on opening day, it started raining and did not stop for 7 days. I used TTC to salt my cape. It worked very well, while the hide never dried out completely it did lock in the hair. I was told that it also has a additive that helps kill bacteria. I took my Ram to Rich at Browtine. He was sceptical about the TTC as stated above. He said that he did not care for how it dried out the hide. He said that most hunters fail to properly flesh the hide, myself included. He said that it was harder to remove the remaining flesh because the TTC drys it out so much. It was a full week before I got my hide off the mountain. The finished product came out great, no hair loss and a beautiful mount done by Rich. People get used to working with the same products and some are reluctant to change. I would use TTC on any trophy animal I take, I only use it on hunt where weight in an issue. Salt is great and has been used forever, But 5lbs of TTC will do the same job as 25lbs of salt. So on fly-ins, it is TTC for me. I believe Rich will back TTC now, I will ask him the next time I see him. He has 2 of my bears still.
    Raw Sheep hide with TTC


    Finished Product



    Steve

  16. #16
    Member 1CRAZY1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Working now in Central Colorado.
    Posts
    37

    Default

    Thanks Stid! Nice pics and good info!

  17. #17
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,272

    Default

    No problem glad to help. Just to add a side note, no amount of salt or TTC will cure a hide if it was poorly fleshed. Large hunks of flesh and tissue must be removed and the ears, eyes, lips and nose have to be split and fleshed as well. Most hunters are not taxidermist and are used to dropping off their game either whole or caped with the skull still in it. An Alaskan hunt often requires a several day wait to get your game out. Spend some time learning to do your part and your Taxidermist will be able to do you a good job. I have seen game laying around at pick up points in all sorts of plastic bags, laying out in the sun. You have to care for your game hides and meat from the time you pull the trigger until you get it to frozen. NEVER let a hide sit in plastic, use game bags. After a hide is frozen you can put it in plastic. Alaskan hides are hard to freeze because of all the hair. It took me 3 days to completely freeze the wifes Grizzly hide this fall. Make sure to turn the hair side in and make sure to turn the face inside out. I had to rotate the hide around several times to ensure it was completely frozen.

    Steve

    Steve

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,956

    Default

    Speaking of Larry and Browtine, I think it was. Take a look at Larry's "Wilderness Taxidermy" videos. Its a great three disc set on how to do the things Stid just mentioned. It details turning the ears, lips, etc.

  19. #19

    Cool Part of the Plan!

    I agree with STID,
    It's not the Taxidermist's "Responsibility" for any damage that has already been caused by someone's failure to due proper trophy preservation! So you can't hold your taxidermist responsible for problems that arise with your cape after you have dropped it off and left. Alot of the problems with capes when they come in are immediately apparent, but some aren't. Someone said it is the "taxidermist's responsibility" to ensure all the proper care has been done prior to shippment to the tannery...... Uhhhhhhh Not so much! Just as you would plan to buy all that cool guy gear for your hunt, clean your rifle, shop your food menu, or inspect that bow prior to you going afield, you need to include planning for and executing proper trophy preservation during your hunt with the proper gear. This is one of the most important, yet over looked parts of a hunt!!! You wouldn't go afield with an unsighted rifle, or arrows you just bought at walmart would you? Sure, as a Taxidermist, I think of all this as second nature, but it is not that hard to learn. I think it often comes down to time. Is it time consuming to completely flesh your hide removing all meat and fat, turn eyes, lips, ears, and nose properly before applying a preserving agent? Heck yes it is..... were talking about hours here that need to be dedicated to this in order to be performed properly. I feel that is what turns people away from doing the right thing. Most times the cape ends up in a meat bag hung in a tree while the celebratory beers are consumed by the camp fire. It must become one of those "Hunting Discipline's" for all that go afield no matter the duration/location of they're hunt. It's something that needs to be understood is all. Think about it as you sit back with a beer and stare at that trophy Sheep or Goat on your buddies wall, and compare that to the Horn mount on your's that would have been, should your cape not have slipped! Anyway, Point Made..... I recommend all check out the DVD called "Wilderness Taxidermy". Larry Bartlett and Rich Hamilton have teamed up and done what many taxidermist's wish would have been done long ago. They made an awsome video that covers not just the hunt, but planning for and executing the complete trophy preservation process from when the animal hits the ground, to when you hand your taxidermist a "Well Cared For Specimen". Very informative!!! I definately applaud they're efforts to make the world of hunting and taxidermy a more perfect place! I hate to think of all the times I have seen awsome trophies wasted because of "user Head Space and Timing". Your choice to use TTC or Salt won't matter if you haven't already set the stage for your preserving agent to be successfull. I think TTC works great for what it is designed to do, but that is after proper trophy care has been done. It definately depleats the hide of harmful fluids rapidly speeding up the drying (protecting) process. More so than our old faithful "Non Iodized Salt" which does require more than just one application, but is still tried and true when used properly....... anytime you leave any "Impurities" on the hide, you risk slippage in that local, and the area around it no matter if salt was used or TTC. Don't leave it to chance, bacteria has been around for millions of years, and chances are it will find a way to continue if not controlled properly. Once you have your trophy properly cared for and salted/or TTC'd, remember, you still arent out of the woods yet! Now you must still win the battle against all the challenges that climate can bring to the table, by keeping it as cool and dry as possible. Sorry for the long post, but this is a topic that I strongly believe in as a taxidermist, and always attempt to make this important subject known when given the opportunity.................... Good luck to all, and thanks for the opportunity to post.
    Be safe, and enjoy your time outdoors!
    Mountain Man

    "I'm not here for a long time! I'm here for a good time!!!!!!!!!!!"

  20. #20
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,272

    Default

    Well said Mountain Man, "Wilderness Taxidermy" is a great DVD to add to any collection. It will pay for itself in one animal. Rich likes to point out my taxidermy skill shortcomings by repairing them for me at a cost...LOL. My last lesson on ear turning cost me 125 bucks to repair my mistake. A good taxidermist can do great things, but help them out and bring them something nice to work with. It will save you money in the long run.

    Steve

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •