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  1. #1
    Supporting Member zman313's Avatar
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    Default Raft ?s

    HI all. A big thank you to the people involved with this site, impressive amount of valuable information. I have a few days to kill before I head out to camp to moose hunt, so my buddy and I are going to float the the Ivishak 9/2-9/8 from a few miles outside the 5 mile corridor back to the road. Would we better of in 2 pr-49s or 1 raft together? If one raft, any recommendations would be appreciated. I'm calling this a fishing/camping trip with the hope we can put on some miles and find a bou or two. I've done the death walk before. My buddies first trip to AK, he in for a treat weather we find animals or not. Any other advice would be a help, thanks.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by zman313 View Post
    HI all. A big thank you to the people involved with this site, impressive amount of valuable information. I have a few days to kill before I head out to camp to moose hunt, so my buddy and I are going to float the the Ivishak 9/2-9/8 from a few miles outside the 5 mile corridor back to the road. Would we better of in 2 pr-49s or 1 raft together? If one raft, any recommendations would be appreciated. I'm calling this a fishing/camping trip with the hope we can put on some miles and find a bou or two. I've done the death walk before. My buddies first trip to AK, he in for a treat weather we find animals or not. Any other advice would be a help, thanks.
    Depends. There are pros and cons to both types of rafts. The Ivishak can be shallow water, but easily doable in a raft as long as you pack light for the upper stretch. Channel selection is critical as it is heavily braided. But as long as you are not overloaded you should be fine with a raft. I am not a big fan of the pack rafts, mostly because of comfort, capacity, and stability, but I know there are definitely rivers that are not floatable in anything other than a pack raft. But I don't think the Ivishak is one of those rivers. One advantage I could see with a pack raft on that river is you could hike up some of the tributaries to hunt for sheep or caribou and you could float out to the main river.

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    Supporting Member zman313's Avatar
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    I didn't even consider hiking up some tribs. Great thought thanks!

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Water drops quick that time of year, even quicker if it gets cold. PR 49 each would be how I would do that, plenty of raft for one caribou each and light enough to drop through the skinny spots. You don't mention how you are getting up river, but if I was hiking in, PR for sure.

    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"

  5. #5
    Supporting Member zman313's Avatar
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    Leaning toward the PR. Getting dropped by Randy Quincy. Thanks for the pic

  6. #6

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    If you do not already have your PR-49 I am trying to get a group buy going on the sale forum. Just trying to save some money let me know.

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    HaHa! that picture is epic.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by zman313 View Post
    I didn't even consider hiking up some tribs. Great thought thanks!
    And the possible added bonus of having more flexibility to split up with your hunting partner if that is what you prefer, although it's usually never recommended to split up for safety reasons, but there are times when it can help your chances of success. Other than that I would say you are better off with a raft. Safer, more comfortable, and even though many claims have been made to over exaggerate the weight capacities of pack rafts (in my opinion) I still feel like a round raft has a much higher capacity to carry more weight safely. But you probably want to be careful with too much weight on the Ivishak.

    Well, Steve would be the guy who would know best. Looks like he has done it in a packraft. I've only taken my raft so I would take his word, not mine. That being said, I'm sure he would agree that if he had to take out more than one caribou per pack raft, it would be a challenge.

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    Supporting Member zman313's Avatar
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    Thanks Bushwack, won't be more than one caribou per raft, unless we get into some good char fishing or a wolf.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    Well, Steve would be the guy who would know best. Looks like he has done it in a packraft. I've only taken my raft so I would take his word, not mine. That being said, I'm sure he would agree that if he had to take out more than one caribou per pack raft, it would be a challenge.
    I disagree. I have had my packraft loaded with roughly 500 pounds total which is less than what 2 caribou and myself and my gear would be certainly and the PR-49 does just fine. I didn't find it too challenging.

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    After seeing that I'm glad I went with the legend... being under-boated is no fun.

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    That's my point

  13. #13

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    looks like a pretty good way to lose a few quarters...lol

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    Larry Bartlett pristine ventures

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    I'd imagine the PR-49 can float close to what it's rated at. It just depends what you will be floating. It is after all a 15 pound boat, and has limitations. When loaded beyond 400 pounds. Be careful what you hit..lol Not much give anymore. I've done two major repairs on mine in two floats(6 inch plus tears). The second I was able to mend temporarily with tyvek tape and get out.... the first needed an over night cure. The river I float has sharp rocks...

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by anchorrivercrowds View Post
    I'd imagine the PR-49 can float close to what it's rated at. It just depends what you will be floating. It is after all a 15 pound boat, and has limitations. When loaded beyond 400 pounds. Be careful what you hit..lol Not much give anymore. I've done two major repairs on mine in two floats(6 inch plus tears). The second I was able to mend temporarily with tyvek tape and get out.... the first needed an over night cure. The river I float has sharp rocks...
    HAHA I have put a couple holes in mine, but they still are ticking. I agree the creek, your experience level, and how much you wanna haul will decide which raft is best suited for your needs.

  17. #17
    Supporting Member zman313's Avatar
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    Thanks all, ordered 2. There going to get a workout, later this year.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    HAHA I have put a couple holes in mine, but they still are ticking. I agree the creek, your experience level, and how much you wanna haul will decide which raft is best suited for your needs.
    yea, more than anything, I'd encourage anyone using a PR-49(or any raft) to do some research, and be prepared to do repairs..up to several feet. Thankfully these rafts can operate low pressure and get you out.. so like I said, my on the fly tape repair of a 6 inch gash held(I needed to stop periodically and re pump, but I got out). Hey.. it's a pack raft... asking a 15 pound boat to perform like a Soar, or other is ridiculous... it can NOT/does not!!

    Know your gear.. be prepared.

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    I am always puzzled by the desire to do a float hunt with a boat that is pushing its limits at 400 pounds?
    The other side of this conversation is on river repairs. I rent a lot of boats out over the course of a season and it is aways my goal that my guys don't have to do repairs.

    I know I am looking at this from a different place but why push the safety and comfort of your hunt?

    Walt
    Gulkana Raft Rentals
    Northwest Alaska Back Country Outfitting

  20. #20
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gulkana Rafting View Post
    I am always puzzled by the desire to do a float hunt with a boat that is pushing its limits at 400 pounds?
    The other side of this conversation is on river repairs. I rent a lot of boats out over the course of a season and it is aways my goal that my guys don't have to do repairs.

    I know I am looking at this from a different place but why push the safety and comfort of your hunt?

    Walt
    Gulkana Raft Rentals
    Northwest Alaska Back Country Outfitting
    Because going with a light packraft can either allow you to fly into smaller strips with lighter aircraft or to hike into more remote, less pressured bodies of water. There are places you can access with a packraft that you can't with other watercraft. Benefits and drawbacks, no doubt.

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