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Thread: Heel Blisters

  1. #1

    Default Heel Blisters

    Anybody want to share their secret to not getting blisters on their heels climbing? I thought I had it solved, but started getting them again. Do you tighten your boots, loosen your boots, lace them differently, what? Also, have you found any blister prevention that actually stays on when your feet sweat?
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

  2. #2

    Default

    Tight boots from the get-go is a must, double up the socks with a thin pair underneath (I have a really thin pair of socks made for runners from Skinny Raven that I love), mole-skin has always stuck well on my feet and put it on before you go.

  3. #3
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    Default tape the feet

    Before you get blisters, apply tape. Several people I know use duct, I like athletic. Eliminate the friction before the red hot spots start and you have a better chance.
    Have to agree on the 2 sock method. Thin polys and a medium/hvy pair of synthetic blend works for me.
    Last thing, have dry socks as often as possible. Now, just where did I put my boots anyway?

  4. #4

    Cool Sock choices

    A great subject, because we're all different. I tend to use a light poly type inner sock with a Smart-Wool (or=) outer. However, it doesnt always work out like I'd hope-periodically recincing the laces should solve the slippage factor but that hasn't always been the case. Anybody else?

  5. #5

    Default

    Just in case you haven't done this -- When you put on the boots, before tightening the laces, lightly slam the back side of your heel on the floor and keep the heel in position against the back of the boot as you tighten the laces from the toes up.

    Two pairs of socks are essential to prevent blisters in almost any boots worth wearing in the mountains. I prefer moleskin for preventing hotspots from worsening. If you let it go too far from that, you'll need to bandage and pay very close attention to the blister.

    During the day, the boots can stretch a little as they warm up (unless they're plastic double boots.) You may have to retighten after the first half hour or so.

    New boots may cause blisters until they come to an understanding with your feet during a suitable break-in period.

    If you still get blisters, the boots probably don't fit you well. See a hiking boot specialist for advice on fit.

  6. #6
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    Default had your problem

    I had your problem going into sheep season last year and resolved the blisters with from the rubs with a thin inner sock. That being said I was not preventing the rubbing from occuring but only the hot spots it was creating. This year I bought a pair of danner heal and arch supports. They take just enough of the extra room in my Meindles to get rid of the rub I was having. My boots are futher broke in to my feet now too which may also be part of the solution.

    As for the care of a blister I have been very impressed with a product made by Band Aid. I believe it is called Blister Block. It is basically a large band aid with a gel like stuff in the pad and the adhesive is heat activated. The hot and more sweaty feet only make it stick better. I've had one last for several days in the field without having to be replaced.

    -Carnivore
    Everything that lives and moves will be food for you.
    Genesis 9:3

  7. #7
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    Default

    All of the advice given here is very good. I will add a quick fix which I used that I have employed a couple of times since. I was on a scoiting trip for sheep and was 2-3 hours from my vehicle and about 3500 feet higher. My plastic boots with liner had never chaffed my heels. Suddenly I realized that it was starting and when I took my boots off to let my feet cool in the air I saw that I definitely had the beginning of a blister on each heel. I knew that they would be really bad by the time I got down. After thinking a bit I realized that I had nothing that would help since this was just a hike. Finally after taking a drink of water from one of the purified water jugs (refilled with water from home) which I had with me, I had the bright idea to cut a piece of plastic from the round side of the jug and slipped one down behind each heel between the bootie and the outside of my sock. Not only did it ease the start of the blister but the blister had just about disappeared by the time I got home. I carried these plastic pieces in my gear (after being trimmed a bit with scissiors to improve my knife work) as part of my gear. It turned out that I had put enough miles on my boots to wear off some of the material in the heel of my bootie and the stitching stuck through enough to cause the blister. The plastic stayed right in place and let the sock slide freely up and down a bit and that worked fine.

  8. #8
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    Default

    In my case it's as simple as wearing boots and socks that fit correctly. Insoles and heel lifts are required in some boots. A second pair of socks won't fix a bad fit. If it's warm and I expect my feet will perspire enough to make my socks damp I'll carry a change of socks and use them before turning downhill. That seems to be when the foot misery really sets in....going downhill. I like Smartwool socks okay but I like expedition weight Capilene socks even better. At the end of the day the capilene still fits my foot as snugly as when I put them on. The Smartwool socks get baggy. I hate it when socks settle down low and loose inside my boots. If I'm doing serious climbing I'll always use capilene since they stay put on my feet better. I'd rather prevent blisters than treat them.

  9. #9
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    Default

    Carry vaseline with you, and apply it to your feet. Toes, heels, all parts. I discovered this when I ran marathons. They had it at the aid stations, and we used it for other things that chafe too. Like most runners, I applied it before the race

    It also worked for me on a hiking trip. I walked for 12 hours, two days in at row.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  10. #10
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Question mole skin

    I've seen alot of people mention it. Do you just apply the sticky side right to your skin or in between 2 socks?

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