Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 51 of 51

Thread: missing plane ancorage to soldotna

  1. #41
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,173
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  2. #42
    Member Barnstormer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Sterling
    Posts
    54

    Default

    Both my planes have 406 ELTís that are coupled to GPS units, providing pinpoint location. But there is no guarantee the ELT will activate, no matter what the frequency it works on.


    Case in point. The Piper PA-28 Cherokee that back in December left Port Alsworth bound for Anchorage. No ELT signal received. No airplane found.


    Another case in point, and this one changed how and when I use my inReach. Three years ago a young friend went missing while on a Sunday morning fun flight. Knowing he left at 7:00am and was planning on meeting a friend back at his home airport at 11:00am I determined we had about a 60 mile radius we needed to search as he was likely to have gone in any direction. We flew to every place we knew he liked to go. We even scouted an area where a helicopter was working a number of small brush fires. No joy. Late in the day I landed to get some water and refuel and learned on the news that the fires had been started by a plane crash (firemen hadnít known the cause of the fires until hours later when they came across what was left of the plane and my friend).


    The crash site was only 4 miles from my airport. The 406 ELT never went off, perhaps because the plane crash landed on its back. Had a fire not started my friendís family would not have closure as the crash site was in a rugged area with no road access.


    Up to that point I only used my inReach when flying into the backcountry, and only paid for the basic subscription which tracked once every 10 minutes. I now use my inReach whenever a propellor is turning in my plane, or when I fly with friends. And I now pay for two minute tracking. Iím no longer relying on an inertia/impact switch in the 406 to activate, nor relying on myself to have enough time to activate the 406 manually with the panel mounted switch.


    My friends and family now know exactly where I am within a two minute radius any time Iím flying. The type of flying I do makes filing a flight plan impractical, Iím subject to go somewhere else at any moment, so the inReach tracking is my flight plan, and a far more accurate one.


    I also have a PLB and Sat phone on board at all times, but thatís a different discussion - and my choice, as is using an inReach. Even though it would not have changed the outcome, my friendís death is why I care about this.
    Phil Whittemore
    If you're not living on the edge you're taking up too much space.

    https://share.delorme.com/PhilWhittemore

  3. #43
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    38

    Default

    What about radar tracks? Aren't they recorded routinely? I remember that the incident where the pilot likely spatial disoriented into the inlet a few years back the track clearly indicated where he likely went in. But that information only came out publicly months later in the final NTSB report as I recall. If they're in primary radar contact it would seem to be critical information.

  4. #44
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,173

    Default

    Record the area around an ant-hill for a day and then go back later to figure out the trail of one particular ant.

    Sometimes they intentionally withhold information, like when a highly intoxicated person takes off in the middle of the night and dives into the inlet.
    They may be afraid that some folks would not think much about searching for someone in those circumstances.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  5. #45
    Member Wldlndfirefghtr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Eagle River & Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    86

    Default

    We had a meeting with the RCC and 212th rescue last year at my work, they gave a presentation on capabilities as it is of interest to us in the Wildland Fire Suppression world for when we have smoke impacts and can't respond ourselves to an emergency. Anyways....

    What was interesting to hear was that it can take up to an hour or so for them to get the request when you hit the SOS on a DeLorme or Spot, as it goes to a call center in the L48, then depending on the familiarity of the person receiving the distress, has to look up who the responding agency is for the state the SOS is originating from, in our case in Alaska it's the Troopers...then the Troopers have to request assistance from the RCC which then stands up the 212th.

    A 406 PLB signal would more directly go straight to the RCC

    Was a very interesting and informative discussion.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #46

    Default

    Anyone know which airstrip they were landing at? All the strips I know of over there have to be covered in several feet of snow this time of year...

    Just curious to know.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #47
    Member theultrarider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    1,019

    Default

    It said in the adn article. I forget. But it also said it hadn't been plowed thus why it nosed over onto its lid. I'm guessing he put his bird down cuz he had too and not because he wanted too.

  8. #48

    Default

    We have lots of snow in the valley but reports are it is very light at 2,000 ft. Northern lights 300 race did not go past Talvista lodge this year due to snow level. Picture looked like might be some bare wind blown ground.
    DENNY

  9. #49
    Member theultrarider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    1,019

    Default

    From the USCG

    JUNEAU, Alaska ó A Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew located and rescued three survivors of a plane crash from a ridgeline landing strip in the vicinity of the Chakachatna River, in the Kenai Peninsula Borough, Monday evening.

  10. #50
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6

    Default

    It looked like the strip at N61.21778 W152.16052 which is a good option for a wheel plane if it is waiting on weather east of Merrill Pass. This is only good though when there is no snow on the ground usually.

  11. #51
    Member mit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    694

    Default

    Oh boy that 406 really saved Stevens butt!
    Tim

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •