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Thread: Bleeding brakes

  1. #1
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Unhappy Bleeding brakes

    The King Quad ('01, LT300) saga continues: Front brakes.

    I thought that I just needed new brake shoes, but after I replaced those, I found that I had no action with the hydraulic aspect so I replaced the plunger and associated parts in the master cylinder. Pretty sure I did it right.

    Bled the heck out of it.

    No resistance at the brake lever; no action with the slave cylinders.

    Put in a new brake slave cylinder I thought was suspect.

    Bled the heck out of it.

    Still no resistance at the lever, no action at the brake cylinders.

    Got a Mighty-Vac brake bleeder thinking this would do the trick, and bled the heck out of it.

    Again, no resistance at the lever, no action at the brake cylinder.

    Bled the banjo fitting. No change.

    What am I doing wrong?

  2. #2
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    Default

    If you did bleed the brakes properly and replaced those parts the only thing I can think of is that you have a leak somewhere in your brake line.
    Did you start at the wheel furthest from the master brake cylinder and completely close the fitting before releasing pressure on the levers?
    Are you getting fresh fluid out of the fitting you are bleeding from?
    These KQ's were famous for the brakes sticking. Have you pulled off all the drums and examained all the brakes?
    Tennessee

  3. #3
    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    Are you holding the brake lever in the engaged position as you partially bleed and then tighten the fitting? As Snowwolfe said, If your bleeding it correct the only thing else would be leak in the line.

  4. #4
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default I've been using a vacuum bleeder

    supposedly you only need to crack the bleeders and pump the vacuum. No need to move the lever at all.

    As far as sticking brakes, the shoes and drums have been cleaned.

  5. #5
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Double check the plunger seals in the master cylinder. I did the same thing on a six wheeler a couple years ago. I had one little spot on the lip of the main rubber seal that folded over on me during the initial install. Replaced it and very carefully reinstalled it. Did the trick. My mityvac has a gauge on it and I pump it up then crack the bleeder until it goes down almost to zero. Repeat until you have good lever.

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    If the master has a rubber line comming off of it, clamp it off. If you still don't have any resistance at the handle then either the master is full of air or it has a bad seal, or not assembled correctly.

    If the master doesn't have a rubber line get a plug and plug it off.

    A pair of vice grips can work to pinch it off, but be gentle, it doesn't take much. A clamp made for it works better.

    If you have a good handle with the master clamped off, them remove the clamp and move down to the next rubber line and see how the handle feels.

    Good luck.

  7. #7
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    I had the same problem, atleast symptoms on my wifes bigbear. Come to find out on her bigbear, to get a good handle pressure, the shoes have to be adjusted so they are touching the drum. I guess the wheel cylinders have such a short throw, they have to be adjusted tight.

  8. #8
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Followed your good procedure

    Quote Originally Posted by FarmerGrant View Post
    If the master has a rubber line comming off of it, clamp it off. If you still don't have any resistance at the handle then either the master is full of air or it has a bad seal, or not assembled correctly.

    If the master doesn't have a rubber line get a plug and plug it off.

    A pair of vice grips can work to pinch it off, but be gentle, it doesn't take much. A clamp made for it works better.

    If you have a good handle with the master clamped off, them remove the clamp and move down to the next rubber line and see how the handle feels.

    Good luck.
    I put a vice grip on the line and had NO resistance. Guess it has to be the master. Thanks Farmer, and all of you for your input.
    Anyone have an extra master cylinder you're willing to part with? I'm thinking any Suzuki of late 90s/early 00s will work.

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    I imagine that you are talking about the front brakes? In some ATV's, including the '94 Big Bear I own, the brakes must be adjusted. In order to do this (1994 Big Bear):

    1. Adjust the lever free-play (at the handle bar) to within specifications (just before the adjuster on the handle contacts the Master Cylinder piston). It's .12"~.20".
    2. Place the machine on a level place, lift it and put it on 4 jacks, spin the wheels by hand and apply the front brake. Check the free-play just before the brake is applied.
    3. Remove both front wheels, and pull out the inspection plugs.
    4. Rotate the drum so that you see the adjusters through the hole (two adjusters per wheel).
    5. Rotate one of the adjusters with a flat screwdriver until the front brake locks, then turn the adjuster back 3 clicks, and squeeze the brake lever several times.
    6. Rotate the same drum 180 degrees so you can see the other adjuster on the same wheel, and repeat the steps on this second adjuster. Make sure there is no brake drag.
    7. Repeat the steps on both adjusters for the other drum.
    -----------

    As you can see, you must follow the instructions on the manual FOR YOUR INDIVIDUAL ATV. First adjust the lever free-play. If you don't adjust the brakes properly after replacing the shoes, then the master cylinder can't reach far enough to move the brake shoes.

    Hope this helps.

  10. #10
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Ray and Blink-

    There is no actuation of the slave cylinders at all, so the shoes cannot move. I have been messing with it without the drums on, so I can see that the slaves are not even moving one little iota. Nada.

    Pretty sure Farmer was right: it has to be that the master isn't doing its job at all. I'll have to worry about the adjustment after I get some movement. Any kind of movement at this point would be nice to see.

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