Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: How to "waterproof" rifle

  1. #1

    Default How to "waterproof" rifle

    Just bought CZ 375H&H for bear hunts. Has the wood stock. Thought about putting on a McMillan fiberglass for water resistance and to shave weight. Found out the fiberglass will actually add weight so for the cost of the new stock I'm really just gaining on the moisture side of the equation. Other than getting the walnut stock glass bedded, is there another low $ way to prevent rain from swelling the wood? I see where some oil the inside of the stock real good. I was wondering why Marine Spar polyurethane coating wouldn't work to keep moisture out. It seems like the Marine Spar would not require sanding down the inside of the stock since it's a thin coat - unlike adding glass. I appreciate any advice. I'm trying not to go crazy customizing a good value gun, while minimizing potential problems with a standard walnut stock. Thanks much

  2. #2
    Member shphtr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    1,376

    Default Syn stock

    If you want to save weight and use a McMillan stock you will have to use their edge/carbon fiber stock but I am not sure if it is available for a CZ. There are a number of other stock makers that I am sure can replace your wood stock with a quality syn one and have you realize a sig weight reduction - MPI, Lone Wolf, High Tech to name a few.

  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Not really practical for a stock that is already finished, but if you are making a stock, completely saturating it with epoxy before adding an oil finish will make for an utterly stable stock. I did that on the stock on my 350, and it has been rock solid in hot, cold, wet and wetter.

    You could sand off the existing finish, heat the stock up on the minimum setting of your oven to open the wood poors, then slather with a good slow setting epoxy. Then sand smooth and add an oil finish if you desire. Lots of work, especially removing the old finish, but you'll as solid a stock as you can get.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    I doubt if the stock from Mcmillan would add any weight. What does your wood stock weigh? The Mc will weigh in at about 2 pounds. There is currently approximately a five month lead time in getting one though (I just ordered another one last week myself).
    Glass bedding will certaintly help as long as it is done properly and the barrel is free floated. I doubt any wood stock can be made 100% waterproof.
    A good bedding job will run you $150-200 and a McMillan stock will cost $425 shipped to your door.
    There are a lot of good stocks out there but the McMillan is the only one I have experience with as of late. There inletting and CNC work is outstanding and the last four I purchased in the past 18 months were drop in replacements.
    Tennessee

  5. #5
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,214

    Default

    1. I put an MPI stock on my old 358Norma Mag and was one happy camper.

    2. I have a stock that I made back in the early 1970s from English Walnut. (Fajen thumbhole) It has never changed zero and has been dunked in water, carried through rain and all sorts of terrible things.
    The exterior is muti coat finished in Deft Bar-Top finish. The interior was 100% glass bedded.
    Plus I rubbed the interior and exterior with a mix of carnuba (sp) and bees wax ever year or so. The water beeds right off.
    It also runs right off the metal parts after they are lightly coated.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks much. I emailed CZ and they said the walnut stock for the 550 375H&H is 2lbs 10 oz. They said the McMillan would be "slightly" heavier but said it was a great option. I'm leaning towards have a smith glass it for me.

  7. #7

    Default

    Be clear in your mind that "glassing" will not take care of all the potential for swelling. It is intended more to true up and stabilize the bedding for better accuracy, but will not necessarily reach into other areas of exposed wood to prevent water absorption. The easiest and quickest way I've found to seal the inside of a stock is with spray-on Tru Oil. Spray the interior surfaces, then use a paper towel to carefully clean the overspray from exterior surfaces. The spray is a real advantage because it reaches into crevices usually missed with a brush.

    Also, be careful about simply "oiling" the inside of a stock. Over the years excess gun oil can soak into wood around the bedding surfaces and soften them enough to deteriorate accuracy. I've had to remove oil saturated wood- especially around the tang- from a number of rifles I picked up secondhand over the years, then glass bed to restore accuracy. Giving away secrets, but a couple of hours spent glass bedding a gun that was picked up cheap because it was "shot out" is a heck of a way to get bargains on some otherwise really nice guns. In my experience "shot out" guns more often have bedding problems than bore problems.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,802

    Default

    "I'm trying not to go crazy customizing a good value gun, while minimizing potential problems with a standard walnut stock. Thanks much"
    __________________________________________________ ___

    Paint the inside of the stock, barrel channel, etc., including stock screw holes, magazine well, trigger inletting, all of it, with Birchwood stock finish a couple three times to seal it.

    Then put a layer of Rig gun greese on the underside of the barrel, action etc. everything. Then wipe down the topside/exposed metal with rig too.

    Next, put a piece of electrical tape over the end of the barrel.

    Provided your stock finish is sealed enough, that oughta keep things from rusting for a little while anyway. You can wipe of the rifle before you go beddy bye. Maybe, take some canned air to blow things out. Even a bore snake to pull through the barrel.

    If water gets into your action, unload and dry it out each evening. (With a paper towell??) Wet cartridges can corrode in there.
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •