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Thread: Headlight and rear flashed

  1. #1
    Member LOCALAK907's Avatar
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    Default Headlight and rear flashed

    Looking for firsthand pros and cons on headlights and flashers. Just got our first fat bikes and well it's freaking dark at 5pm lol


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  2. #2
    Member LOCALAK907's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LOCALAK907 View Post
    Looking for firsthand pros and cons on headlights and flashers. Just got our first fat bikes and well it's freaking dark at 5pm lol


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    Oops flasher


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  3. #3
    Member SteveAK's Avatar
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    I am partial to Light and Motion lights. I have an older Vis 360 which works well for commuting and adequate for snowbiking. The newer Vis 360 has more lumens and longer run time. I also have hub generators on my snow bikes and use a Supernova light. Not highest lumens because I use for commuting on paths. http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/lightingsystems.htm Excellent source of information. I just got a Fortified light for son's bike, http://fortifiedbike.com/, seems bright but haven't seen it in use. Also put on this light, https://www.cateye.com/en/products/detail/TL-LD570-R/, on son's bike so that he doesn't have to remember to turn it on.

    Lots of options.

    Lots of options.

  4. #4

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    There are a ton of options for the headlight end of things. The taillight is easy. You don't need much, if anything (I don't use anything but I am only on the trails in the woods and not riding the roads). Just about any red blinker works great for the rear.

    For the headlight, you want something fairly bright for riding trails. Ideally, something with multiple settings for intensity. When I ride on wider, multi-use trails (such as the Tour of Anchorage trail in Anchorage), I will use the low setting since I don't need a lot of detail, but when I get into the tight singletrack where I am dodging trees, ruts, roots, and wayward moose, then I like to use a higher setting. Also, if I am trying to ride faster, more light helps to see things before you run into them. Anything with 500+ lumens typically work great but you can get away with less depending on your type of riding. Another thing to consider is a 2nd light for a helmet mount. The bar mounted light is great, but if you are riding on twisty trails, it is often nice to see ahead to what you are going to be getting to around a corner.

    My setup includes a Nightrider Pro 1800 (a bit overkill, rarely use anything but the lowest setting) on the bike and a Nightrider Lumina 750 on the helmet. I only turn the helmet one on for singltrack riding or racing for the most part.

    If you are commuting on/adjacent to the roads, be very cognizant of drivers. Strobe lights can work well for being seen during day and twilight times, but the high intensity strobes can be blinding and very distracting to oncoming people/vehicles at night. A low intensity LED headlamp with a flash setting can accomplish the task of making you visible without blinding others. Combine that with a steady beam headlight and you can see where you are going and won't give anyone a seizure.

  5. #5
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    For commuters I highly recommend that you carry a spare headlight that you keep charged. I have, more than once, let my primary light battery die and have had to ride the last couple miles home in the dark with only a taillight. I now carry the Serfas Thunderbolt as my backup in the winter. It produces 90 Lumens, with a couple different power saving settings (including strobe). It's also my primary light in the summer. Super convenient to temporarily mount anywhere on any bike. Recharges with a micro-USB cable.

    Their red light works find as a primary taillight in either the summer or winter.

    $45 MSRP, but the Hording Marmot had them for $20 each. Not sure if they are still in stock.

    https://www.serfas.com/products/view...-lights|page:3

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