Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 68

Thread: New Muzzleloader

  1. #41

    Default

    Here are closeup of the engraving on the cap box and toe plate. The engraving on the remainder of the brass as well as the lock and hammer is equally fine, and all duped from original Leman rifles.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  2. #42
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    504

    Default

    Nice! Thanks for posting. I can really see the draw of a custom rifle. That's some beautiful workmanship.
    Louis Knapp

  3. #43

    Default

    Thanks back at you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Louis View Post
    I can really see the draw of a custom rifle.
    In fact this is the first custom muzzleloader I've had built. Owned some others I picked up second hand, but this is the first where I got to call all the shots. It's as much about passing it on to appreciative offspring when I take the long dirt nap.

    I don't see this being my knock-around, do everything rifle. Already have some of those. This one is for special occasion hunts where the going will be fairly easy and the "spirit" of the hunt is more about nostalgia than rooting critters out of rough terrain. I'm going to be using it mostly with reduced loads for snowshoe hare, but certainly hope to take a deer or two with it. And yeah, I'll spend a lot of time looking and fondling!
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  4. #44
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    sand lake
    Posts
    68

    Default

    very nice !!!

  5. #45

    Default

    Thanks!

    If anyone is curious or inspired, the old Green River Rifle Works from the 1970's is "resurrected" after a fashion. For anyone not around back then, GRRW was a company set up with a bunch of talented gunsmiths who built guns one at a time by hand as close as possible to originals they had in their collection, including original Hawken rifles. A lot of premium rifles came out of their shop, even if it only lasted a little over 5 years as far as I can reconstruct.

    Anyhoo, in the last few years a GRRW Collectors Association was formed, and out of that a handful of the old smiths got together and put together an arrangement for more of the guns to be built, but with a CA in the barrel stamping to show they came out of the Collectors Association rather than the original GRRW shop.

    I am the proud owner of a GRRW 58 caliber Hawken, and when the association was formed it was natural for me to join (no membership fees). My Hawken was built by Ron Paull, who by coincidence lives here on Kodiak Island now. It was natural for me to really want another great gun by Ron, and that's where the Leman Squirrel Rifle came from. Read about the GRRW Collectors Association if you're curious. There's a detailed Hawken history there, as well as a listing of the guns being made and description of the ordering process. They're by no means cheap, but quite reasonable within the price structure for custom guns.

    It will take a while for my slush fund to rebuild after this one, but you can bet I'll sooner or later be going back to the well for another drink. Something tells me I really NEED a faithful reproduction of Jim Bridger's Hawken.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  6. #46

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Here are closeup of the engraving on the cap box and toe plate. The engraving on the remainder of the brass as well as the lock and hammer is equally fine, and all duped from original Leman rifles.
    I was driving across the lower 48 the other day with my mind wandering and that usually means guns and I thought, hmm wonder if BB ever got that Leman rifle back. So I got my trusty cell phone pointed at the right star and bingo there it was. BB she is a beauty.....a work of art. There is not a prettier piece of wood than curly maple stained dark. I really like it!

    Good smiths don't have to advertise...their buyers do it for them and such is the case here. I can only imagine your grinning from ear to ear, I am and it ain't even mine.

    I have been wanting another 32 cal.. I am needing another wrinkle in my squirrel hunting adventures. Hmmm...................

  7. #47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    I have been wanting another 32 cal.. I am needing another wrinkle in my squirrel hunting adventures. Hmmm...................
    For some reason I'm kinda fascinated with smaller caliber guns built and used back East when the market moved to big, tough guns for hard use out West. Lotta folks still lived in the East and continued to hunt, even as deer and bear populations dwindled and the few elk, moose and bison disappeared. Whole lot of smaller caliber rifles made in the Eastern market during the Western fur trade era. There's a lot of styles and detailing around when you start looking. Heck, even the famed Hawken brothers made "squirrel" rifles.

    Once my finances (and wife!) recover a bit, I hope to start the process for a Hawken squirrel rifle, just cuzz you never hear much about other folks doing them. Here is a link to the Hawken squirrel rifle from Don Stith, reknowned for his faithful Hawken kits put together based on original Hawkens he owns. Note that those are PARTS SETS rather than easy-do kits. They take a whole lot of gunsmithing to turn into a finished rifle.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  8. #48

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    For some reason I'm kinda fascinated with smaller caliber guns built and used back East when the market moved to big, tough guns for hard use out West. Lotta folks still lived in the East and continued to hunt, even as deer and bear populations dwindled and the few elk, moose and bison disappeared. Whole lot of smaller caliber rifles made in the Eastern market during the Western fur trade era. There's a lot of styles and detailing around when you start looking. Heck, even the famed Hawken brothers made "squirrel" rifles.

    Once my finances (and wife!) recover a bit, I hope to start the process for a Hawken squirrel rifle, just cuzz you never hear much about other folks doing them. Here is a link to the Hawken squirrel rifle from Don Stith, reknowned for his faithful Hawken kits put together based on original Hawkens he owns. Note that those are PARTS SETS rather than easy-do kits. They take a whole lot of gunsmithing to turn into a finished rifle.
    I had both a Seneca 36 and a Cherokee 32 at one time. They were very good guns for my purpose way beck then. My brother still has the 36 and the Cherokee belongs to a hill billy in App. Mountains. I looked at a couple CVA "Squirrel Rifles" at gun shows but even though they were in very good condition for what they are they are still junk in my book. I looked at the sight you showed me. I am pretty good at fit and finish work but fitting the breech plug might be beyond my ability......dunno new ground for me. However the description of the Hawken squirrel rifle in 32 with 7/8 barrel is what turns me on. They don't come with the lock though?

  9. #49

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    They don't come with the lock though?
    As far as I know, they don't come with a lock. I don't have any personal experience with Stith, but know lots of folks who rave about his products. "The most authentic" is what you usually hear. But I also know that turning his parts into a finished gun is the work of experienced builders at least, but mostly pro builders of good repute.

    I know you can get the Traditions Crockett 32 caliber in kit form, but I throw Traditions into the same category you throw CVA. Bought a finished Crockett and loved that little thing, but started having lock problems after about a year and a half. Traditions was happy to sell me a new lock for about half the cost of a new gun, but I told them to pound sand. It's still leaned up in a corner waiting for me to die. That's when I'll spend another cent with Traditions.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  10. #50

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    As far as I know, they don't come with a lock. I don't have any personal experience with Stith, but know lots of folks who rave about his products. "The most authentic" is what you usually hear. But I also know that turning his parts into a finished gun is the work of experienced builders at least, but mostly pro builders of good repute.

    I know you can get the Traditions Crockett 32 caliber in kit form, but I throw Traditions into the same category you throw CVA. Bought a finished Crockett and loved that little thing, but started having lock problems after about a year and a half. Traditions was happy to sell me a new lock for about half the cost of a new gun, but I told them to pound sand. It's still leaned up in a corner waiting for me to die. That's when I'll spend another cent with Traditions.
    Yup, don't think there is a nickels worth of difference between a CVA and a Traditions side hammer gun and their poorly cast lock assemblies are the thing that I can't live with for the same reason as you experienced.

    I wish Lyman made a 32 or 36. I have scads of pure lead balls in 32 and 36. Ole Butch had my 32 mold last as he was making buckshot for his 10 gauge that he shot coyote with. Butch had a bad habit of beating on the mold instead of the handle when knocking the ball out. It doesn't take much of that and then the molds don't line up so well. When Butch passed I got the mold back and 1,000 very poorly molded .310 balls. I have been shooting them out of my sling shot. But I have twice that many that are perfect and I need something with a side hammer with which to shoot them. I had a single shot H&R in 30-30 for a while and I loaded some of those round balls in 30-30 case at about 6-700 fps and they were fine for squirrels out to iron sight squirrel distance. However that is not the same. There is nothing that I enjoy more than sneaking around the squirrel woods with a little muzzleloader while wearing my knee high moccasins.

  11. #51

    Default

    I sure hear you on the pleasures of small game skulking with a muzzleloader. I think I've said it before: I shouldn't even claim to be a deer hunter, because I probably put in 100 hours on small game for every hour I put in on deer.

    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    I wish Lyman made a 32 or 36. I have scads of pure lead balls in 32 and 36.
    Just a heads up. Bud got all spun up for the same and had a smith gin up a 32 caliber drop-in barrel for his Lyman GPR. Accurate as a snake bite, but that thing weighs a long ton. The 15/16" barrel has so much steel left after boring that little .320" hole, it's only fit to serve as a pry bar for moving large rocks. He still shoots it at the range, but it's purely a range rifle. He carried it on a hunt zackly once before admitting his costly mistake.

    No tears shed though. He found a H&A underhammer "buggy rifle" in 32 cal. Weighs about the same as a Ruger 10/22 and easily as accurate. Keep your eye to the ground for tracks leading you to one of those! Of course, suspend pursuit if you come across BrownBear tracks ahead of yours.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  12. #52

    Default

    I have for sure come full circle in my hunting. I used to think that one started off hunting small game and then graduated to big game. Boy is that philosophy flawed. I became a horn hunter for a while and got some dandies. I have two heads left and they go two of my grandkids as soon as they convince their mom that it's ok to have them on their bedroom wall! I think back to the pleasures of my youth. Stuff a couple peanut butter sandwiches in a sack, grab a dozen 22 shells, my trusty iron sighted Remington 514, twine string it to the handle bars and head for the woods. My dad got off work from the Oliver tractor factory at 4 PM and if I wasn't home by then he'd bring his old truck to the woods and load my bicycle up and honk his horn and hope that I wasn't sound a sleep under a tree somewhere in that 120 acre patch. By mid January that patch contained the smartest squirrels in the world. They endured 4 months of that young two legged devil who kilt their young. I can remember my neck getting so sore for staring up in those tall hardwoods looking for a head in a crotch looking back at me. By the end of the season it was looking for the smallest thing out of place in those trees as once you saw the tip of tail hanging off of a branch it was a long period of time before their curiosity would get the best of them and they couldn't stand it any longer and they had to peak over the branch to see if the 2 legged devil was gone. They usually found the barrel of that 22 already trained on them.......I win again. Now-a-day I would rather shoot two with a front stuffer then a half a dozen with a 20 power scope on a fat barreled 22. Sometimes well after dark my wife will call my cell phone to make sure that the squirrels didn't finally win and the now old two legged devil hadn't taken a dirt nap in the woods. I answer with a nope, I ain't dead, I'm just cooking squirrel over the fire and listening to the owls. You know BB, getting old isn't so bad so long as you do it right! I used my 514 again last fall. There will be a 32/36 smoke pole in the works for next fall........

  13. #53

    Default

    Talk about parallel paths! Sad to contemplate how few kids these days are likely to grow up like we did.

    Interesting thing to me, like most of us I followed Keith, O'Connor and all the rest of my big game heros over the years. And eventually every one of them turned into a bird and small game hunter. I didn't understand it in my youth. Now I do!
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  14. #54

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Talk about parallel paths! Sad to contemplate how few kids these days are likely to grow up like we did.

    Interesting thing to me, like most of us I followed Keith, O'Connor and all the rest of my big game heros over the years. And eventually every one of them turned into a bird and small game hunter. I didn't understand it in my youth. Now I do!
    For sure. I quit pheasant hunting for good about a decade ago. New knees and I'm now back at it. I hunted almost everyday after work this past season. My new pup made me. I can't remember ever having that much fun when I was doing it 30 years ago. I guess I appreciate it more now. I love to watch that dog work and savored every moment of it. I did miss a few easy shots and that never used to happen. I just figure that God wanted that one left for seed, then tell the dog that I'm sorry and look for another one.

    BB, we can't get our youthfulness back but we can go back to when we were youthful and I'm telling you it's more fun than it was the first time around!

  15. #55

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    BB, we can't get our youthfulness back but we can go back to when we were youthful and I'm telling you it's more fun than it was the first time around!
    There it is.

    Youngsters reading this won't understand any more than we did when our heroes switched to the little stuff. But you and I can say for sure, they'll be smiling our smiles in a very few years!
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  16. #56

    Default

    I picked up the rifle Friday, but sad to report the weather has closed in to the point there will be no shooting for a while.

    Meanwhile, I have to say it's probably one of the nicest rifles- muzzleloader or bolt- I've ever seen. Certainly one of the nicest I'm ever likely to own.

    But pretty as it is, I intend for it to be a shooter. The smith may have gone above and beyond in the pretty stuff, but more important to me, he fine tuned the shooting details too. It's balance point is right under the front sight (done by adding a bit of extra barrel length to counter the extra LOP I need for my gangly frame). He has his own "trade secret" ways of adjusting a trigger, and it shows in this one. Though it's a single trigger, it has zero take-up or overtravel while breaking at well under 5#. Haven't taken a trigger scale to it yet, but I'm guessing between 2.5 and 3. And crisp? Holy cow. Even though heavier, to me it's even better than most double set triggers I've used.

    Funny thing is (more trade secrets, when I asked him), the traditional tiny low sights are very easy to see, even with my old eyes. And with the thin front blade and narrow gap in the rear, it's going to be real easy to do precise shooting on bunny heads.

    I'll have to use it for deer in the regular season rather than the muzzleloader season (50 cal minimum) since it's a 45. But no big deal for me. It needs to flatten a few deer to prove itself, but it's really a snowshoe hare gun in disguise. If it proves as accurate as the sights make me hope, it might even start accounting for a few ptarmigan heads.

    I feel like a proud new father in the maternity ward!
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  17. #57

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I picked up the rifle Friday, but sad to report the weather has closed in to the point there will be no shooting for a while.

    Meanwhile, I have to say it's probably one of the nicest rifles- muzzleloader or bolt- I've ever seen. Certainly one of the nicest I'm ever likely to own.

    But pretty as it is, I intend for it to be a shooter. The smith may have gone above and beyond in the pretty stuff, but more important to me, he fine tuned the shooting details too. It's balance point is right under the front sight (done by adding a bit of extra barrel length to counter the extra LOP I need for my gangly frame). He has his own "trade secret" ways of adjusting a trigger, and it shows in this one. Though it's a single trigger, it has zero take-up or overtravel while breaking at well under 5#. Haven't taken a trigger scale to it yet, but I'm guessing between 2.5 and 3. And crisp? Holy cow. Even though heavier, to me it's even better than most double set triggers I've used.

    Funny thing is (more trade secrets, when I asked him), the traditional tiny low sights are very easy to see, even with my old eyes. And with the thin front blade and narrow gap in the rear, it's going to be real easy to do precise shooting on bunny heads.

    I'll have to use it for deer in the regular season rather than the muzzleloader season (50 cal minimum) since it's a 45. But no big deal for me. It needs to flatten a few deer to prove itself, but it's really a snowshoe hare gun in disguise. If it proves as accurate as the sights make me hope, it might even start accounting for a few ptarmigan heads.

    I feel like a proud new father in the maternity ward!
    Proud new father huh? As many guns as have passed through your hands and for one to make feel that way says it all. It's real hard to
    Get me overly excited about a gun anymore. If anything would do it a custom made squirrel front stuffer would. As far as guns go I want for nothing......but a skirl gun. I'm stacking my nickels.

  18. #58

    Default

    Pm sent back to answer yours. Actually two. I hadn't learned to type yet on the first one!
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  19. #59
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    440

    Default

    That looks really nice!
    That country was so hungry even the ravens were packin' a lunch.... HUNGRY I tell ya'!!

  20. #60
    Member sharps5090's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Brown Bear, do you want to sell that Traditions 32? I'm looking for a small rifle for my 6yo grandson. He just loves the muzzle loaders buy I don't hace anything small enough for him to shoot.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •