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Thread: Opinions on brown bear round. 9.3x62, 375 ruger, 416 ruger, 45-70.

  1. #1

    Default Opinions on brown bear round. 9.3x62, 375 ruger, 416 ruger, 45-70.

    Just looking for general consensus.

    I already have a 9.3x62 mauser with a 22" bbl, but am thinking about building a 375R or 416R on my control feed SS Savage action. IE a rebarrel.

    Seems like 375R is too close in diam to the 9.3x62 although the 375R packs more punch.
    I have owned a 375R before (barrel) and sold it like a dummy. Very nice round.

    Could step up 416R and that would be good for anything on the planet, although with the correct bullet most likely a 9.3x62 would also.

    Could also go for a 45-70 in a lever action, a bit faster to cycle, but not the range of the 375R especially. 416R either.

    I don't think I will ever sell my 9.3x62 since I built it from scratch and if I set up a 375R I honestly dont know how much I would use it.

    My gut feeling is I would use a 45-70 more often than a 375R or 416R.

  2. #2
    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    You need to consider the range at which you'll be taking shots. Any time I pack through heavy brush or walk into a bait site I go with my 45-70. Its got a short barrel so I can wheel it around quickly if necessary and it packs a hell of a punch. Im confident with it open sighted to a little over 100 yds but beyond that I wouldn't even try it.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

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    The 375 Ruger is a good round and you can pick up ammo for about 60 bucks a box now at Cabela's, I don't know what .416 is running but i've seen it going for 150 bucks a box I believe. I've never shot a bear with a .375 but it puts the hurt on moose, and I know a lot of people have been using the .375 H&H all over Africa and Alaska for many years shooting big game. The 375 Ruger is a little hotter than the H&H so it should work fine. I would feel comfortable shooting anything in this state, if you're going to shoot anything like a caribou or something I would just shoot it in the neck if you're worried about meat loss.

    45-70 is a good round from what I've heard but I've never used it, with the .375 I am good enough at shooting I can nail a target 400 yards away with the scope on it. I know a guy who shot a moose and a black bear with a .416 Remington mag, it put the hurt on both of those but I do not know enough about the .416 Ruger to say how similar it is to the Remington, that being said it should dust anything in this state.

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    Quote Originally Posted by acg515 View Post
    The 375 Ruger is a good round and you can pick up ammo for about 60 bucks a box now at Cabela's, I don't know what .416 is running but i've seen it going for 150 bucks a box I believe. I've never shot a bear with a .375 but it puts the hurt on moose, and I know a lot of people have been using the .375 H&H all over Africa and Alaska for many years shooting big game. The 375 Ruger is a little hotter than the H&H so it should work fine. I would feel comfortable shooting anything in this state, if you're going to shoot anything like a caribou or something I would just shoot it in the neck if you're worried about meat loss.

    45-70 is a good round from what I've heard but I've never used it, with the .375 I am good enough at shooting I can nail a target 400 yards away with the scope on it. I know a guy who shot a moose and a black bear with a .416 Remington mag, it put the hurt on both of those but I do not know enough about the .416 Ruger to say how similar it is to the Remington, that being said it should dust anything in this state.
    Brought 3 nice caribou bulls home a couple weeks ago. Got almost 100 pounds of boned out meat from the necks alone. Neck shots, especially with that big of a rifle can ruin lots of meat. Just plunk them in the ribs like you normally would and there's little meat loss.

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    Member Antleridge's Avatar
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    I love the 9.3s; I have two 62s and a double rifle in 74R and I am comfortable with them for brown bears. I have a 375H&H and never carry it cause I don't think there is much real-world performance diff b/w the 9.3s and the 375 - JMO. If you're looking for more that the 9.3 for browns, I would go with the 416 - it will be a nice step up in performance. I have a 416Rem and like it, but some folk I trust love the 416R.

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Antleridge View Post
    I love the 9.3s; I have two 62s and a double rifle in 74R and I am comfortable with them for brown bears. I have a 375H&H and never carry it cause I don't think there is much real-world performance diff b/w the 9.3s and the 375 - JMO. If you're looking for more that the 9.3 for browns, I would go with the 416 - it will be a nice step up in performance. I have a 416Rem and like it, but some folk I trust love the 416R.
    I've never shot a bear, but I agree with this. I don't think you get much more out of a .375 over the 9.3x62 except longer range capability (and more recoil). If you were going to go up from the 9.3, I think the 416 would be a substantial step up, otherwise, stick with your 9.3. I think the 9.3 has great ballistic capability out to 200-250 yards. Beyond that, the .375 has the advantage. I think the benefit of the 9.3 is a moderate velocity combined with a heavy bullet = a nice big hole and little meat damage like you can get from a 300 or 338 WM.

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    My suggestion would be moving to the 416. I see a lot of overlap with the 9.3 and 375, and I've been considering the same thing. For me it's the cape buffalo that made me want to move up, otherwise the 9.3/375 is plenty, and a proven performer on brown bear.

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    Member Trappnguns's Avatar
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    Umm... 30-06 semi auto (such as a BAR)... That's all I ever when looking for bear with..

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    Quote Originally Posted by CapnMike View Post
    Brought 3 nice caribou bulls home a couple weeks ago. Got almost 100 pounds of boned out meat from the necks alone. Neck shots, especially with that big of a rifle can ruin lots of meat. Just plunk them in the ribs like you normally would and there's little meat loss.
    I grind most of that meat anyways so I don't lose a lot if I pop it right behind the head.

  10. #10

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    For a close range defense gun I suppose the 45-70 is OK. But for a serious hunting round I wouldn't consider the 45-70 for brown bear, it's a close range round at best. The loss of energy at longer ranges is just too great, especially considering that there are much better calibers available. Why would you want to handicap yourself or possibly lose a wounded bear.
    I had a client show up for a brown bear hunt with a lever action 45-70, when a bear presented it's self at 150 yards he asked to use my 375, which I happily handed him.

  11. #11

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    Why not a 338? I own a 375, and it's a nice gun. Worked great as a guide gun for me back in the day when I was an assistant guide, but starts dropping really fast after 200 yards. Same thing for the 45-70 and 416. The 338 packs a good punch, is reliable at farther distances, and the ammo is a lot more affordable. Just my .02. That being said, it is wise to make your shots on bears closer than 200 yards. And closer than 100 yards is even better, but you don't always have the luxury of getting that close.

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    I am surprised no one brought up a short 12 gauge with slugs. Very effective at close range.

    375 or 338 are good choices for longer ranges.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Just stick with what you have,plenty for Alaska and most of Africa
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Any besides the 45-70
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

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