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Thread: Trail riding help

  1. #1
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    Default Trail riding help

    In reading an article today about an ATV rider dying in a roll over accident, got me to thinking.
    With the weight/size of the machines today, what are the chances of those riding with you, of being able to get the machine off you while under water? All of the machines that we have weigh between 700-1300lbs dry! I know that I am not able to lift/move one of them. While they all have winches on them, how long would it take to get the winch deployed in order to be able to move the machine?
    What emergency procedures do you have in such of case? When it really can get ugly is when one machine is out!

  2. #2

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    It is not JUST in or under water being pinned by the machine. About two years ago a man riding alone, on a dry trail was pinned under his machine. After suffering for many hours, he ended up taking his own life.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Every situation is different. The best advice is to ride carefully and take the time to analyze what you are driving on, across, over etc. A couple years back, I flipped my machine on top of myself because of a careless mistake. I was able to push it off of myself, but I was in bad shape. Broke some ribs and a little bruising on my liver. I feel very fortunate. A couple weeks later, another gentleman was not, that may be the person AGL is speaking of.

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  4. #4

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    I had a good friend Andy "The Bear" P. roll his riding lawn mower on top of himself over at his homestead, and he died under the machine. Farm tractors, horses, seems anything man rides he can get pinned under.

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    I was putting out from my cabin on the 6 wheeler one fine day. Right front tire hit a stump in the grass. Tore the handle bar out of my hands and wheeler tried to climb the stump. It nearly went over on me. Not sure this old man could have got out from under it. My personal trail also, so not likely anyone would have been along to help. Be careful out there.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  6. #6

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    There probably isn't much in the way of physical equipment you could have with you to help extricate yourself since most things would not be within reach if you were pinned. Under water makes things a lot worse for obvious reasons. Traveling in a group will always help since you will have others who can react and try to assist if possible. For non-water times, it would be strongly advised to have some form of communication within easy reach (not in a bag/storage on the machine, but on your person in a pocket or on a lanyard). Whether it is a cell phone if you are somewhere you have signal or a sat phone or other GPS locator, if you have it within reach, you may have a way to call for help.

  7. #7
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    That's a tough one. People can do pretty amazing things in an emergency situation with adrenaline.

    I ride alone a lot and would be like dude in post #2, except I'd just be pinned forever, I suppose. As many people that hunt Eureka & Denali during hunting season, it's desolate prior to the big game opener.

  8. #8

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    A few years ago another fellow died in Homer when his machine rolled over on him, think a handlebar got under his ribs and caused massive bleeding. There is a lot of weight and force when they get moving. Not for everyone, but youtube is full up guys doing crazy things in Side by Sides and the roll cages seem to do their job pretty well, something to consider, though you'd have a lot harder time getting one unstuck by yourself.

    Seems like every year someone dies crossing the Brushkana off Denali. Be careful around water.

  9. #9
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    Those of us that do any amount of riding, will get in 'trouble' at some point in time.
    Many years ago, I was hunting with another families kids when I got into trouble. We had gotten caribou about dusk, which meant riding back to camp, 8-9 miles, in the dark. We each had full caribou on our machines. I hit a 'dump' in the trail and got rolled. My machine had me pinned so I could not move. I was not in the position of being hurt, just could not move the machine so I could get out from under it. I was lucky enough that the two kids were there and we able to lift the machine off me. They were both good size and able to lift lots of weight. I called them my 'human hoist' for what they could do. After that I paid more attention to when/where I was riding.
    I was one of the lucky ones!

  10. #10

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    Our emergency plan starts with prayer before every trip. We try to use our head and remind our selves that we are riding to have fun and avoid taking unnecessary chances or being reckless. Side hilling, steep hills, obstacles in the trail, excessive speed and water crossings are probably where most of the ATV dangers are.

    I never cross any stream if I think it is to deep or fast as their is nothing on the other side that is worth risking our life or a 10,000 dollar machine over.

    Any side by side machine will be a death trap if it flips over, as you and your passengers chances of getting out of it while underwater and bouncing your head on the river bottom are slim.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    Any side by side machine will be a death trap if it flips over, as you and your passengers chances of getting out of it while underwater and bouncing your head on the river bottom are slim.
    Seatbelts are not your friend underwater, but a roll cage may keep you from getting pinned underneath the machine.

  12. #12
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BQuad View Post
    Seatbelts are not your friend underwater, but a roll cage may keep you from getting pinned underneath the machine.
    I have H style harnesses in my RZR and won't do them again. The best setup is a race style harness with a single quick release that separates the harness into 4 separate straps. With the H style you still have to pull your arms out of the loops which adds time/effort to getting out in an emergency.


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    Having been in 3 aircraft noseovers (ahem, flown by others, 2 landing against my advice) and having flipped my SxS 3 more times than I wanted to, I realized that:

    - There is nothing over there, wherever "there" is, that I MUST get to;
    - Whatever the style of restraint is called (or actually "is"), that releases everything with one button, lever, etc is absolutely critical. In one of the plane flipovers, between gear and crumpling fuselage, I was held by straps so that I could only move one forearm.......fortunately that was enough.

    " The best setup is a race style harness with a single quick release that separates the harness into 4 separate straps."
    Tick tock, Tick tock, the Texas Clock

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoose35 View Post
    Every situation is different. The best advice is to ride carefully and take the time to analyze what you are driving on, across, over etc. A couple years back, I flipped my machine on top of myself because of a careless mistake. I was able to push it off of myself, but I was in bad shape. Broke some ribs and a little bruising on my liver. I feel very fortunate. A couple weeks later, another gentleman was not, that may be the person AGL is speaking of.

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    Don't know how long you've been here, but do you remember the guy that died after rolling his new Grizzly over on himself right off the side of the Spur Hwy? They looked and looked for him for days. If I recall he rolled into some thick brush or alders and couldn't bee seen even though he was right there close to the road. I also think it was supposed to be a quick ride to the store or something....was a pretty sad and unfortunate tragedy.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  15. #15
    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Don't know how long you've been here, but do you remember the guy that died after rolling his new Grizzly over on himself right off the side of the Spur Hwy? They looked and looked for him for days. If I recall he rolled into some thick brush or alders and couldn't bee seen even though he was right there close to the road. I also think it was supposed to be a quick ride to the store or something....was a pretty sad and unfortunate tragedy.
    Yes, I was here and remember that. Things can go bad on a wheeler in a hurry

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