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Thread: Quarter weight?

  1. #1

    Default Quarter weight?

    What do you guys think a hide quarter (bone in) of an adult bull weigh on average?
    I was just curious. I guess I should've weighed them when I had a chance.
    It seemed a bit heavy when packing over a mile.



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  2. #2
    Member ak_cowboy's Avatar
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    Moose or caribou?
    My moose front were about 120, caribou was around 50

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  3. #3

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    i'm not sure what the numbers are but on my back a 50+ bull weighs about 3x that of a spike/fork.

  4. #4

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    the further you have to pack it. the heavier they get. Add 10lbs. for every 1/4mile.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by isnarewolves View Post
    the further you have to pack it. the heavier they get. Add 10lbs. for every 1/4mile.
    Could be like 15 pounds haha
    It's like a fish! It just keeps growing out of control the more you talk about it.
    The pack was about a mile and a quarter.

    55" moose


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    Had a very large bodied moose this year a buddy in camp got and we called him Popeye because his forearms were massive along with everything else on him...his hinds were 120. Biggest we have shot.

  7. #7

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    My buddies 53" bull's hind quarters were 101 pounds each.

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    Member Sockeye Scott's Avatar
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    We weighed hind quarters on a 50" moose at 112 lbs.

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    I just weighed a rear moose quarter, deboned. It was 124lbs including an aluminum frame pack....

  10. #10

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    Okay thanks guys!


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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Highly variable. You can have two bulls of equal antler size, yet two vastly different body sizes. We killed a 64" bull last fall, which made the Boone and Crockett record book, and the hind quarters weighed 130# each. A client of mine killed one a few years ago, a younger 60" bull of unremarkable antler development (short palms, skinny beams, not many points, and poorly-developed brow structure) and the hind quarters were 165# each. I killed one in the arctic many years ago that taped out at 58", and though we didn't weigh the hind quarters, I can tell you that they were even larger than those from my client's 60" bull I mentioned. Lots of variation.

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    As Mr. Strahan says, its really too variable to get more than an average. Another major factor is how you cut your hindquarters. We split ours at the pelvis (with a sawzall), and then cut all the way through behind the last rib (with a sawzall). This obviously adds a tremendous amount of weight. My 62" large bodied bull this year weighed in at 140#. A buddy's 66" bull was of the 'super' large body size variety. We didn't weigh his but they hung in our cooler next to mine and dwarfed the hinds off my moose. We guessed his at a solid 165#+. The heaviest we've put on a scale were 180#. We cut them this way for one purpose- we age our moose for 12-16 days in a a shed that's been converted to a cooler with an AC unit. Temps stay 37-39 degrees during the day, then we turn the unit off and put fans on them at night. Cutting them the way we do preserves some of the best cuts in the moose, e.g. Sirloin, back end of the New Yorks. Hamming hinds at the ball joint exposes a lot of meat that has to be discarded unless it's processed relatively soon.

    We pack our moose on our backs as most of our access is via super cubs. That being said, we rarely kill a moose more than 1/2 mile from a landing spot.
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  13. #13

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    I have packed many moose over the years and a decent sized bull will have hind qts. in the 165-175 pound range. I chafe always carried them as a whole leg because the hoof makes a nice can't-a-lever (sp?) but you could hack the upper from the lower but still a 60+ inch bull will be to big to carry on a frame for a guy my sized very far.

    I had an elder from the village of Noatak tell me one time many years ago If you can't see your boat, don't pull the trigger" Very smart man!

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    Got 93 off a hind this year

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    This year we had a 60 that had 110, a 40 that had 90 and a 50 that was 105. Pretty typical of our experience. Antlers haven't got much to do with butt weight in general. For us, anything over 50 inches is within 10 lbs of each other, but there have been a couple toads that pushed 140. Not sure why the difference but most talk of 150 lb quarters is illusion. They happen, but most are under 120.....they all hurt.

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    The first moose I ever packed out left the field in 5 pieces, we split that thing right down the backbone, then cut those halves in two at the second rib. The neck was separated from the shoulder area before we split it. That was a mid sized bull, 45 or so inches but a hearty body. Those rear "quarters" weighed in over 170 each.

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    There are 3 weights to quarters (whether moose, 'bou, sheep, deer, or even some hogs): 1) the perceived especially-at-the-bar-or-around-impressionable-young-ladies weight; this is usually a large figure and supported by great tales of strain and strength and with much gusto: "There I was, 20 miles from camp, with swamp to cross uphill both ways, and with angry bears on every side, but I managed to make it with 150# of meat on my back and I also chopped a weeks' supply of wood afterwards"; 2) the weight of the quarter as it would have weighed 20 years ago: "Yep, this 50# quarter may have really kicked my 58 y.o. butt..... but, back in the day I never had a problem packing 180# quarters twice a day"...uphill both ways, of course; and 3) the weight that we keep in deep dark places that we don't talk about...the actual weight from a scale. Since #3 can be proven from the scale, that means we don't have to talk about it, right?
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    I got 500 pounds of boned out meat from a nice sized bull a few years ago. Didn't weigh the quarters. But I'm thinking those hinds with the bone in would have easily topped 150 each. Fortunately didn't have to pack him.
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  19. #19
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    Highly variable. You can have two bulls of equal antler size, yet two vastly different body sizes. We killed a 64" bull last fall, which made the Boone and Crockett record book, and the hind quarters weighed 130# each. A client of mine killed one a few years ago, a younger 60" bull of unremarkable antler development (short palms, skinny beams, not many points, and poorly-developed brow structure) and the hind quarters were 165# each. I killed one in the arctic many years ago that taped out at 58", and though we didn't weigh the hind quarters, I can tell you that they were even larger than those from my client's 60" bull I mentioned. Lots of variation.

    -Mike
    I believe nature has a unique way of determining for each animal weather more nutrition needs to go to the body or the antlers. Sometimes it balances out nicely. But I too have seen 70" moose with pretty lean hinds, and high 50s with massive ones. Never did weigh any, but you sure could tell when they're on your back. Sometimes it seems that a lot of those real big/heavy horned bulls have a lot of upper body mass. Maybe it's from having to hold up those heavy racks?
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    Member Bambistew's Avatar
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    I called IVM a few years ago and asked about take in weights on moose quarters. It ranged from 80-125 pounds on average bone-in (spikefork to large bull). they did say that a few Clydesdale type bulls came in form time to time that were bigger, but on average that was the weight of hind quarters.

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