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Thread: Using Levitator raft to haul ATV across river?

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    Default Using Levitator raft to haul ATV across river?

    Anyone ever try to use the Levitator or something similar to haul an ATV across a river?

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    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
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    I've never tried but I imagine it's doable if you could make a suspended, rigid floor. Otherwise the weight of the machine would cause the floor to sag and the the tubes to pull inwards. I would definitely test it in shallow water prior to a river crossing though.

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    Not sure if the Levitator video on our website can still be viewed, but it's worth a shot to see a 4-wheeler placed onto a Levitator.

    lb
    https://pristineventures.com

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    Those were my thoughts. I would plan on utilizing a 1 inch thick sheet of plywood for the base, what I need to look into is if it would be better to load it perpendicular to the raft or in line with it. My real concern is the moment of inertia being too high to cross a river in class II/III waters.

  5. #5

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    yeah, i'd say pucker up. I wouldnt do it, but i dont own a wheeler. The one suggestion i have would be to keep your CG as low as possible and the raft balanced around the compass. Depends on the river speed entirely.

    I used 1" plywood as a base if memory serves. but it was a dry run.

    sketchy
    https://pristineventures.com

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    I understand the pucker factor, its the river speed that really concerns me, at least with the river I have in mind. I do not hunt much from an ATV, mostly canoe and raft but just exploring options. I appreciate your input though Larry as I know you are very experienced.

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    Member Ken R's Avatar
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    If you can get your hands on some cataraft tubes and lash them to the sides it would keep your CG low. I've thought about doing it with my cat tubes, but never had the balls to risk my RZR going for a swim. But, I'm sure someone has tried it?

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    On a related note, I did a load test on a 14' conventional self-bailing round boat (an NRS Otter) last fall. I placed a sheet of 3/4" plywood across the tubes and placed two empty plastic fish totes atop the plywood. I slowly increased the load and was able to get 2,000 lbs. of water in the totes before backing off for fear the plywood would snap in two. I was never able to submerge the tubes up to the D-rings before backing off. The tubes rotated slightly inward as the self-bailing floor hogged up longitudinally, while the main tube shape became oval. I believe (but was not able to demonstrate) that the floor would not have flooded out with increased weight, but would have been pushed up until it was at least even with the top of the tubes. As I increased the weight, I also measured the increasing draft of the boat. I have not published the numbers yet, as another more pressing issue pushed that project off my desk temporarily. I hope to provide the details at another time. It was an interesting test that changed some of my perceptions of how inflatable boats handle extreme loads.

    I would not have ever attempted moving this kind of weight with that boat on moving water.

    My initial reaction to hauling an ATV on an inflatable would be to consider a cataraft such as the AIRE Super Leopard or the Cougar. These boats handle 3,000# and 2,500# respectively. The main advantages of this setup are better tracking than a round boat, the ability to add a swing-down loading ramp to drive the vehicle aboard, and the ability to spread the tubes via frame extenders, to accommodate the width of the vehicle. The wider stance of a wider frame gives you greater stability with the heavier load.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
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  9. #9

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    I have used my Aire Cougar to haul my Yamaha Kodiak 4 wheeler across the river before and that worked fine.

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