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Thread: Metal detecting (Not for gold)

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    Default Metal detecting (Not for gold)

    Got myself a nifty new toy. A metal detector. I want to take it out to some historical sites like mines or ghost towns or something. Yes, I know the laws pertaining to artifact hunting. Anyone ever go out and do metal hunting? Any good spots or pointers? I'm not really interested in gold or getting rich or anything, I just like history. I'm thinking of going out to Kennecott to try my luck before the snow hits.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    No offense meant... You say you're aware of laws pertaining to artifact hunting; are you aware Kennecott ia a National Historic Landmark within a National Park?
    He who knows nothing is closer to the truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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    Are you aware that many old gold mining towns are private property, and some of those property owners would not be happy if they found you digging up their relatives.

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    Member theultrarider's Avatar
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    And Kennicott is an active park with a fulltime staff watching your every move?

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Yes please avoid the national parks.
    I once asked about detecting a state park here on the peninsula.
    The detecting wasn't going to be an issue but I then I mentioned having to dig the targets and that became an issue.
    They hadn't realized at first that detectors are worthless without being able to dig the targets.
    But I realize government employees are not always the smartest bunch.

    I recommend a good plastic scoop and small pick for digging targets.
    Also a screwdriver works well for coins.
    In grassy areas use the screw driver for coins and small targets.
    Larger ones cut a plug and put it back when done.
    Use the plastic scoop and the law of halves.
    Once the target is In the scoop put half the dirt in your hand and wave the scoop over your coil with your other hand.
    If it's in the scoop drop the dirt from your hand and repeat.
    If in your hand empty the scoop and repeat.
    You'll eventually get to where there's just a little dirt and your gold/coin/etc.
    Always check for a second target in your hole.
    Bring a good magnet I like having one stuck on my pick to make metal trash easy to find.
    Also a small spray bottle of water for cleaning small items off.
    Don't get too focused on your detecting.
    Look up occasionally and keep track of were your going so you don't get lost.
    Also watch for bears.
    Remove all trash you find and fill in your holes.
    Remember leave no trace.

    BTW what brand and model of detector did you buy?
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Like I said, I know the laws. I don't plan on digging or taking anything. And Kennecott was just an example. I have a 4 year old daughter that would love to go with me and assist me in just looking around and finding things.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    BTW what brand and model of detector did you buy?
    https://www.amazon.com/Garrett-Ace-1...metal+detector

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply.
    I'm not familiar with that particular detector.
    They used to say you got 1" of depth detection for every $100 your detector cost.
    But I'm not sure if that holds true anymore with modern electronics.
    Certainly that is a beginner level detector but Garrett is a good name brand.
    As far as not digging targets well... then what's the point?
    Detectors are for finding buried objects you can't see on the surface!
    Are you really insinuating you'll use your detector to find hidden metal items then not dig them up?
    Digging them and leave them behind?
    There are plenty of places to legally use a metal detector and keep what you find.
    Research a few such places lace up your boots and head out.
    If you think the item(s) you found have significant historical value you can always donate them to a museum or historical society.
    Be safe,legal and enjoy your new hobby.
    Lots of old mines in Alaska and old town sites, homesteads etc.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    Thanks for the reply.
    I'm not familiar with that particular detector.
    They used to say you got 1" of depth detection for every $100 your detector cost.
    But I'm not sure if that holds true anymore with modern electronics.
    Certainly that is a beginner level detector but Garrett is a good name brand.
    As far as not digging targets well... then what's the point?
    Detectors are for finding buried objects you can't see on the surface!
    There are plenty of places to legally use a metal detector and keep what you find.
    Research a few such places lace up your boots and head out.
    If you think the item(s) you found have significant historical value you can always donate them to a museum or historical society.
    Be safe,legal and enjoy your new hobby.

    It *says* that it can do about 6 inches down. I'm not too worried about it, it's just something fun for my daughter and I. She'd freak out if she even found a penny. I plan on eventually going out to my cabin and do some hunting around and digging, but just for surface stuff, it'd be a blast for the little one. Any pointers on legal areas around 100 miles or so from Anchorage? Thanks for the response!

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TintedSnow View Post
    It *says* that it can do about 6 inches down. I'm not too worried about it, it's just something fun for my daughter and I. She'd freak out if she even found a penny. I plan on eventually going out to my cabin and do some hunting around and digging, but just for surface stuff, it'd be a blast for the little one. Any pointers on legal areas around 100 miles or so from Anchorage? Thanks for the response!
    Yes they can be a lot of fun.
    I live on the peninsula so couldn't help you on stuff near Anchorage.
    Pick up a copy of the gold prospectors magazine.
    You'll find the contact info for the Anchorage chapter of the GPAA in there.
    They could likely help you.
    If you attend one of their monthly meetings you'll likely meet many local detector enthusiasts.
    I know our Kenai chapter used to do a once a year class and coin hunt at one of our monthly meetings.
    Fun times finding quarters and dollar coins while learning your detector with the help of some seasoned pros.
    Steve Hershbaugh (spelling?)
    Used to do a nugget detector class each year at AMDS.
    Not sure if he still does since he sold out to his employees and semi retired.
    There used to be a gold show at crow creek every other year.
    They had a coin hunt.
    Me and my buddy once each won a 1 ounce silver coin in the hunt.
    For coins school yards and parks can produce modern coins. Fun for your daughter.
    Go when they're not crowded and leave no trace.
    Old homesteads can be good places to look (with permission of the landowner) never know what you might find from old tools to coins and silver spoons.
    I found my friends dads corner markers on his remote property he bought that were covered in years of grass and weeds.(aluminum mushrooms types)
    Lots of uses for a metal detector.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  11. #11
    Member EMoss#83's Avatar
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    Fun to start off in the kids playgrounds with pebbles, for coins and cheap jewelry and easy to dig. and your rate of return is better. Must be patient and enjoy it ,you will dig lots of trash items.
    "f/64 and be there"

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