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Thread: How Big Does a Lake Need to be to Have Fish in It?

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    Default How Big Does a Lake Need to be to Have Fish in It?

    in the interior, and relatively close to other running bodies of water, what is the smallest lake you've seen fish in. i am looking to ice fish in a lake that is about 1 and a half miles long

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    Member theultrarider's Avatar
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    Is it landlocked, or is there an inlet and outlet? If you've got flowing water in and out, odds are it will hold fish. That is plenty big.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theultrarider View Post
    Is it landlocked, or is there an inlet and outlet? If you've got flowing water in and out, odds are it will hold fish. That is plenty big.
    it looks landlocked, there probably is a drainage route though that remains mostly dry but overflows at some times

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    how deep counts a lot. they need O2 in the water, an if it turns to ice there is no O2 there [ freeze out ] will count a lot ,
    what type of fish are you looking for ? FOOD counts a lot for the size [ food to grow on ] SID
    good luck explore you will never gain if you don't explore

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    That's quite large - certainly big enough for fish.

    I've found fish in ponds no larger than my dining room table. Granted, they were a fraction of an inch in size, but still - fish inhabit some pretty crazy inhospitable places. A mile and a half lake? That's certainly enough habitat for a healthy population of fish.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    That's quite large - certainly big enough for fish.

    I've found fish in ponds no larger than my dining room table. Granted, they were a fraction of an inch in size, but still - fish inhabit some pretty crazy inhospitable places. A mile and a half lake? That's certainly enough habitat for a healthy population of fish.
    Brian is spot on. Depends on the fish too. If you are talking about the Alaska blackfish, well then they can live in a puddle in your backyard. Pike also have a higher tolerance for low oxygen and warmer waters than most fish in AK. If you are talking about a trout or grayling, then you will most definitely need a lake with lots of oxygen, and cool enough temperatures somewhere in the lake (less than 50 degrees F give or take), and enough food. Shallow lakes often winterkill because they run out of oxygen in the winter time. Fish and Game stocks a lot of the lakes that winterkill though so you even if it is a shallow lake it may have some stocked fish in it. Like others mentioned, in order to have adequate oxygen for trout and grayling, you typically have to have an inlet/outlet and/or a spring. Plants can provide a little bit of oxygen but usually not enough for trout for the summer and winter months. All lakes go through a spring and fall turnover where the lake mixes and replenishes the system with fresh oxygen, but summer and winter months will deplete the lake of oxygen. The reason why an outlet is important is the lake has to have a way to remove the excess carbon dioxide produced by the fish also. Too much carbon dioxide will produce carbonic acid and lower the ph.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    Brian is spot on. Depends on the fish too. If you are talking about the Alaska blackfish, well then they can live in a puddle in your backyard. Pike also have a higher tolerance for low oxygen and warmer waters than most fish in AK. If you are talking about a trout or grayling, then you will most definitely need a lake with lots of oxygen, and cool enough temperatures somewhere in the lake (less than 50 degrees F give or take), and enough food. Shallow lakes often winterkill because they run out of oxygen in the winter time. Fish and Game stocks a lot of the lakes that winterkill though so you even if it is a shallow lake it may have some stocked fish in it. Like others mentioned, in order to have adequate oxygen for trout and grayling, you typically have to have an inlet/outlet and/or a spring. Plants can provide a little bit of oxygen but usually not enough for trout for the summer and winter months. All lakes go through a spring and fall turnover where the lake mixes and replenishes the system with fresh oxygen, but summer and winter months will deplete the lake of oxygen. The reason why an outlet is important is the lake has to have a way to remove the excess carbon dioxide produced by the fish also. Too much carbon dioxide will produce carbonic acid and lower the ph.
    you see this is the kind of post i like, full of all sorts of science and useful information

    i am mainly looking for food for my dogs when out in the wilderness, and food for my own survival if need be.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sovietjet View Post

    i am mainly looking for food for my dogs when out in the wilderness, and food for my own survival if need be.
    Most sport-caught fish cannot be used as food for dogs. Read the regulations carefully on this one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Most sport-caught fish cannot be used as food for dogs. Read the regulations carefully on this one.
    lmao

    which eastern cancer on earth american tried to come up with that one?

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