Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Thoughts on the new SeaArk 2252 Sourdough?

  1. #1
    Member BluNosDav's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    450

    Question Thoughts on the new SeaArk 2252 Sourdough?

    Came across an ad in Alaska Fishing magazine and then went to the website;

    http://compeaus.com/boat-models-avai...t-at-compeaus/

    So, what do ya'll think about this new "narrow freighter" style design ???

    I've got a 20hp Honda prop and a 25/18hp Yamaha jet that could use a second purpose.

    Thanx, Dave.
    "Luckily, enforcement reads these forums, and likely will peruse this one...Especially after a link of it is forwarded to them....." - AlaskaHippie.

  2. #2
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,040

    Default

    I always like unique boats. Sure looks like a fun boat. I would buy one with a prop tunnel for your 20hp Honda. I used to own a SeaArk 1652 with a Tohatsu 50/35hp TLID. In prop form it was spectacular! One time I borrowed an Evinrude 25/18 jet and it barely made it on step while empty. The benefit of the long skinny boat is that they don't have any bow rise and don't need much HP to plane out. 20 years ago I got to do a forestry project out of Stevens Village on the Yukon and we had a riveted 2048 with a 30hp Johnson that went well. With your 20hp Honda you could do a lot and go far for next to nothing on fuel. I think a better match would be at least the Honda 25-30hp with a 40-50 or even the 60hp. I bet you could trade it in at a Honda dealer if your 20 just isn't enough. For comparison I also run a much heavier 22' Harbercraft landing craft with a Honda 90 and I get it fully loaded and I run in the salt, my current SeaArk 1860 MVJT has a Honda 90/65 and it is a pretty great jet skiff.

    Sobie2

  3. #3

    Default

    The sourdough is designed to have a 50hp prop on it

  4. #4

    Default

    Not to hijack this thread but what is a boat like this good for? It's looks like it would be nice for felled trees.

  5. #5

    Default

    It can haul a decent amount of weight, great fuel consumption, lightweight so 2 people can easily move it.
    Most people that live in the villages along the yukon run a similar setup.

  6. #6
    Member BluNosDav's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    450

    Default

    There's an old (Navy) saying, that everything on a boat (ship), should serve (at least) two purposes . . . . For me, that also applies to outboard motors.

    My 20hp Honda prop pushes my Leopard cat-a-raft across lakes, and my 25/18 Yami jet pushes my Alaska Jet Ranger up rivers. But, not often enough too earn their (full) keep. So, I'm always looking for another application. Was thinking about a freighter canoe, until I saw this skinny aluminum boat . . . . .

    Thanx, Dave.
    "Luckily, enforcement reads these forums, and likely will peruse this one...Especially after a link of it is forwarded to them....." - AlaskaHippie.

  7. #7
    Member BluNosDav's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    450

    Default

    Plans change . . . .
    My daughter drew a YM541 Any Bull Moose Youth tag in GMU-16B.
    If I strapped a Yamaha 60/40 jet to a Seaark 2256 Sourdough . . . .
    would that make a fuel efficient boat for running way up the Yentna?
    Thanx, Dave.
    "Luckily, enforcement reads these forums, and likely will peruse this one...Especially after a link of it is forwarded to them....." - AlaskaHippie.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    All-I-SAW, AK.
    Posts
    1,036

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BluNosDav View Post
    Plans change . . . .
    My daughter drew a YM541 Any Bull Moose Youth tag in GMU-16B.
    If I strapped a Yamaha 60/40 jet to a Seaark 2256 Sourdough . . . .
    would that make a fuel efficient boat for running way up the Yentna?
    Thanx, Dave.
    Fuel efficient? No...
    With that motor, unless you make 2 trips to get all of your gear and (1) moose back to the landing, then maybe. It'll be a slow go though.
    If you're going with a jet, I personally, would go with an 90/65 as an absolute minimum for a hunt like that....

  9. #9
    Member BluNosDav's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    450

    Default

    Thanx Swamp!

    The Sourdough is rated for motors of up to 70hp. A 90/65hp jet is considered a 90hp for rating purposes.
    Dealers are usually required to follow these HP "limitations", when outfitting a new boat.
    Owners sometimes exceed these "recommendations" and operate their boat at their own risk.

    I'm more concerned with the actual weight of the motors, that hang on the transom, so, let's compare that:
    A Yamaha 90/65 jet weighs 391 pounds, while their 60/40 jet weighs only 259 pounds.
    That's a 132 pound difference, which is equivalent to 22 gallons of gasoline.
    Which combo would go further, a boat with a 90/65 jet motor and say 50 gallons of fuel,
    or the same boat with a 60/40 jet and 72 gallons of fuel?

    Unless you don't think that a 60/40 jet would even get a loaded Sourdough up onto plane?

    The Yamaha 70hp motor is about the same weight as their 60hp motor (it just doesn't come from the factory as a jet package).
    But, if I was willing to buy the parts separately, I could build a 70/50hp jet motor that would still weigh about 130 less than a
    90/65 jet motor, and carry an extra 22 gallons of gas.

    Would that be the best of both worlds?

    Thanx, Dave.
    "Luckily, enforcement reads these forums, and likely will peruse this one...Especially after a link of it is forwarded to them....." - AlaskaHippie.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    All-I-SAW, AK.
    Posts
    1,036

    Default

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but HP ratings are for propeller driven crafts. If you never put a prop on there and just go with a jet, a 90 "could" work.
    Engine weight would be the only factor. An Etec 90hp (not the H.O.) is only 320#... The H.O. is 390#...
    But if your looking at 70hp, here's this.. And any of these can get a jet...

    Model Name: DF70 Honda 75 Mercury 75 Yamaha 75 Etec 75
    Manufacturer: Suzuki Honda Mercury Yamaha Evinrude
    Weight (Lbs): L (341) L (359) L (399) 369 336

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    All-I-SAW, AK.
    Posts
    1,036

    Default

    PER the US Coast Guard website:

    MAXIMUM HORSEPOWER The maximum horsepower
    information listed on the capacity label is a guide for
    selecting an engine for a boat. Its not a violation of Federal
    Regulation to install or use a larger engine. Boaters should
    check state regulations for restrictions. They should also
    take a look at their insurance policy regarding horsepower.

    Compeus even states "re-hull your power" if wanting to go bigger..
    I had Deweys change out a 115/80 Johnson jet to a 150/105 VMax a few years back. The template for the boat said: max 120hp..
    Just throttle back and save fuel...

  12. #12
    Member BluNosDav's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    450

    Default

    Swamp,

    I don't think that we are in disagreement. Maybe I'm just more concerned about weight. The Sourdough was designed to be a fairly lightweight boat, and the Yamaha 90/65 is one of the heaviest motors in it's class, while the 70-prop converted to a 50-jet would be one of the lightest. Not sure the extra 15hp at the nozzle is worth it, unless it's absolutely necessary for adequate performance? The other brand motors that you listed are slightly lighter, but, those weights are for the prop models, adding a jet foot will add more poundage to each.

    Like I said, dealers "usually" follow the HP stickers. One here in Anchorage has flat out refused to rig any of their boats with larger motors. Glad to hear that yours in Fairbanks is more flexible. Might be an insurance issue? And again, owners can re-power as they see fit.

    The reasons that I'm interested in the Sourdough is to have a boat light enough to get it un-stuck single-handed, and fuel efficiency. At some point, having a bigger motor that requires more fuel, starts to defeat that lightweight goal.

    Thanx for all of your research and suggestions.
    "Luckily, enforcement reads these forums, and likely will peruse this one...Especially after a link of it is forwarded to them....." - AlaskaHippie.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    All-I-SAW, AK.
    Posts
    1,036

    Thumbs up

    Light boats, light engines, haul big loads, jet or prop, are all great topics of conversation.
    These Sourdough boats were/are the pride and joy of the Yukon. That river has 90+% of its usable/runnable water as being "prop worthy", up to freeze up.
    It's deeper.. That's where that Sourdough style of boat shines best, is with a prop...
    The big SU and the Yentna are also prop worthy during certain times of the year, no doubts. But mid/late September is or can be, a whole different story. Unless we get a good rain around that timeframe, it'll drop to a point where you can walk across the big SU. I've done it.. I guess my point is, you'll be alot more restricted with a prop in this arena.
    I live in Wasilla and have been running these rivers for almost 30yrs now. Wide bottomed jon boats with a jet seem to do the best..
    Me personally, for running our rivers, I'd try to get as much jet as I could get on that boat...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •