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Thread: It still shoots!

  1. #1

    Smile It still shoots!

    About 4 years ago I came across a pretty good deal on a Pre-64 Mod 70 Featherweight 30-06. The bore looked good and the old rust blue is still over 95 %. I saw it's potential and bought it. I needed one as I had just given my "Stainless Classic" Mod 70 in 30-06 to my daughter.

    I had the muzzle re crowned, an Old English Pachmayer red recoil pad installed and a full barrel channel, recoil lug, rear tang bedding job that left the barrel free floated about 2 inches from the receiver. A trigger job resulted in the best breaking hunting trigger I have ever pressed. The bottom metal was replaced with a one piece Williams Obendorf style and the 2 action screws were timed.

    I then took it to a local guy and he reshaped the stock, installed an ebony forearm tip and pistol grip cap along with some Super Grade swivels. He then re cut the checkering and tediously hand rubbed a mixture of teak and Tung oil finish into the stock that has a very subtle reddish tint.

    It wears a Leupold VIII 1.7 x 6 32 mm matte scope and I had the Leupold Custom Shop install their Post/Duplex reticle in it and put it in Warne quick detach rings with their 2 piece bases.

    A 1" wide brown Montana Leather Rifle Sling was perfect for this rifle.

    So after 4 years and a bunch of money and planning I said a prayer and headed to the range. I brought 2 loads with me, the first was good and the second one with another grain of powder was very good. I had Winchester cases, WLR standard primers and a case full of H4350sc with the 168 gain TSBT seated .050 of the lands as Barnes recommends for a starting depth.

    The best load produced a 3 shot group that was right at 3/4" center to center. Not bad for a rifle made in 1958. I will be back to the range soon and fire a 5 shot group at 100 yards to verify the load. After that I will zero the scope for 200 yards and shoot it at 300 and 400 yards. That is as far as I trust my self with a good rest on a moose or caribou if they are broad side and patiently waiting for me to shoot.

    If Brockman's Rifles ever gets going again with their pop up peep sight built into a rear Talley base I will go that route and remove the scope when the urge hits me.

    If my son in law stops by I will try to post a couple of pics. I am low tech.

    Sitting around the moose camp fire with walnut and rust blued steel on an old Mod. 70 ought six is really living!

  2. #2

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    Very good description 338 mag! Nothing like sitting in the woods with a piece of nostalgia in your hands. If the hunt gets boring you can always sit there and admire your gun. I have looked at pre 64 model 70's for years and have only bought a couple but they were for the shop and caught me at a time when my jingle was low so I had to watch other customers walk out the door with them.

    I am pretty much set for the rifles that I need and my needs get less as I age but the one gun that still stops me dead in my tracks at gun shops and gun shows is a pre 64 model 70 featherweight. It was, is and always will be "The Rifleman's Rifle" and it pretty much sets the high water mark for rifle standards.......at least in my book!

    When I retired from 30 years of technical work....splicing fiber optics and installing DSLAMs so rural folk could enjoy this new thing called the internet. I walked away and said no more technical crap for me. My son got mad at me the other day and said" You can take an old air chuck and make a gas bushing for a Mini-14 that will make the brass land in a coffee cup but you can't even run your own cell phone.......and that's the way I like it. So I understand the low tech comment. However when your son-in-law does show....put him to work loading some eye candy for us because I would really like to see some pictures of that gem.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    ...when your son-in-law does show....put him to work loading some eye candy for us because I would really like to see some pictures of that gem.
    Amen! But keep an eye on him.

    Our son-in-law is headed this way next month for a mix of salmon, halibut and deer. His one request is that I have my Savage 99 284 all sighted in and waiting. I suspect he has visions of taking it back home with him. Actually a pretty good thought, cuzz he's getting it in the end anyway. No sense making him wait on the pride of ownership and enjoyment of using.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  4. #4

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    I located a Pre-64 Mod. 70 Featherweight in .243 Win. and will be going to Anchorage soon to look at it. I think it needs some attention, but the bore is supposed to be good.

    Some day I will find the right Winchester to use as a downer rifle and have some thing with a 6.5 bore made up. I have a Pre-64 in .264 Win. Mag. that has a 26" barrel, that I think is stainless and is over 90%, but I just can't warm up to the rifle. I don't see my self lugging the heavy thing around and prefer other cartridges. It has sit in the safe and unused for 15 years.

  5. #5
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I too had a pre 64 westerner in 264 that had no heart. It now lives with a friend who uses it a a beanfield rifle and loves it
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  6. #6

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    Bought a Westerner NIB back when they were over the counter. Yeah, long ago. That was wide open mule deer country mostly hunted horseback. Loved that thing with a Seirra 140gr soft point and a case pertnear full of the original surplus 4831. Tack driver and deer killer waaaay out there. Moved to NoCal, got hungry and got all tangled up in the dense tangles with the long barrel, so traded it for a virtually unfired first-year Featherweight in 308 and some cash. Did the deed for several years with the 308 until painting a house in trade for a pair of 99's, one in 308 and one in 300 Savage, then hunted with those for a while.

    Getting ready to make my move up here in 1975, I got all kinds of advice that neither the 308 nor the 300, or for that matter almost everything else I owned, was "suitable" for Alaska. So I peddled it all, and took a pretty good hit here and there, especially on that Featherweight. Boy, was I ever stupid to listen to all that good advice from folks who read lots but never once set foot in Alaska! Here it is 40 years later and I'm still replacing some of those guns. There's a vacant spot in the rack for another pre-64 Featherweight 308, but I just haven't found the right one at the right price yet.

    I repeat. It's STUPID to let other folks with no first hand Alaska experience tell you what's right up here.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  7. #7
    Member 2dawgs's Avatar
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    Wow, that sounds like a dandy. Post pics when you can.

  8. #8
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Sounds like a sweet set up 338! I will be waiting on pics as well. Only pre-64 70 I ever owned was a 264mag, I shot half a box of factory rounds through it and here in IL it did not make sense to have so it was traded off... I always wanted a 3006 or 308 though... Like EKC its getting harder to justify adding safe queens at this point, my son likes to hunt but he is not really into guns to feel the nostalgia.... Got 7 YR old grandson though that has potential...!
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  9. #9
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    Sounds like you did it right! I can't stand it when someone "rebuilds" a rifle and makes it some monstrosity killing the essence of it. I may have done that with an old Rem 700 BDL .308 my father gave me but I was in college (lesson learned). Can't wait for the photos!

    Sobie2

  10. #10

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    Yup. Gotta respect the "spirit" of a rifle. I shudder to think how many pre-64's turned into "donor" rifles for a custom someone felt was better. Ick.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  11. #11
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    Default It still shoots!

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Yup. Gotta respect the "spirit" of a rifle. I shudder to think how many pre-64's turned into "donor" rifles for a custom someone felt was better. Ick.
    Agree, unless some gun jones got ahold of it and butchered it up to begin with. Then it's fair game as a donor. :-)

  12. #12

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    Got 7 YR old grandson though that has potential...![/QUOTE]
    There ya go! Nothing stirs the coals in regards to all things shooting like a grandkid that shows intrest. They need to know that newer does not mean better in regards to guns. I failed to convey that to my son. Shiny and black only applies to motorcycles. Figured wood and blued steel for guns.😉

  13. #13

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    I have been shouldering and dry firing the old rifle and it comes on target fast and has good balance. The plan is to use it this year as I have not used a 30-06 in a long time because I always grabbed my .338 Win. Mag. Only a few more days till we head north for caribou and moose.

    I think those 168 grain Barnes TSBT bullets will be good performers on caribou and moose or any interior grizzly, as long as I put them in the right spot.

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